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Comment: Re:Not really happy (Score 1) 171

by ergo98 (#49081035) Attached to: HTTP/2 Finalized

The whole "HTTP/2 stink" thing seems to be a bit of a meme, but it's remarkable how the people who state it vaguely wave their hands around and make unsupported claims.

1. HTTP/2 is *fantastic* for higher latency connections. If you're a small site and you can't afford to have geolocated servers around the globe, HTTP/2 offers a much better experience for those high latency connections. I've been using SPDY for a couple of years to service clients in Singapore from a server in the US (which for a variety of legislative and technical reasons I can't replicate there). It is absolutely better.

2. HTTP Pipelining is when you know that someone is just doing the "I oppose" thing and searching around for objections. HTTP pipelining is not supported by default in a *single* major browser because it has critical, deadly faults that render it useless. When people bring it up to oppose HTTP/2, their position is rendered irrelevant.

3. HTTP/2 removes the need to do script and resource coalescing. It removes the need to deal with difficult to manage image sprites. All of those are bullshit that are particularly onerous and expensive to little sites.

4. HTTP/2 makes SSL much cheaper to the experience. This is very good.

HTTP/2 is a *huge* benefit especially to the little guy. Google can do every manner of optimization, they can deploy across legions and armies of servers around the globe. This can be expensive and logistically difficult for little sites, especially if you want SSL. HTTP/2 levels the playing field to some degree.

Comment: Re:"risks serious damage to the system" (Score 1) 138

by ergo98 (#49070721) Attached to: NVidia Puts the Kibosh On Overclocking of GTX 900M Series

It isn't about "a chip". It's about a system that is designed for a specific thermal and electrical load. nvidia probably got flak from notebook makers who were facing dissatisfied customers.

You only have to look at a lot of the nonsense comments throughout, such as yours -- people just contriving how "easy" everything is, and how simple it is. Yeah, and I'll bet all of you design notebooks. No? Then shut up.

Comment: Re:A truly smart person ... (Score 1) 391

by PitaBred (#47656211) Attached to: Is "Scorpion" Really a Genius?

Sometimes. Confidence combined with deference and recognition of that which you don't know is a different sort of confidence than brazen overconfidence like this "Scorpion" guy. If you can admit what you don't know easily, I'm more likely to believe you when you say you actually do know something. But it takes confidence to know the difference.

Comment: Re: Much needed feature (Score 2) 89

by Trinn (#47289109) Attached to: Mozilla Is Working On a Firefox OS-powered Streaming Stick

I think the answer is obvious from the parent post. Without a dedicated receiver to route signals, hdmi all goes to one place, and many people prefer other speakers than their display has. I should also point out that the digital pcm streams in hdmi are easy to rip if hdcp is not active on the link, so your assumption is off. On the other hand I believe drm schemes only hurt the customer and the artist, only serving to enrich the content distribution cartels.

Comment: Re:Wind chill on a space suit? (Score 1) 110

by JabberWokky (#47242735) Attached to: There's No Wind Chill On Mars

It is likely that Arthur C. Clarke, the co-author of Space Odyssey, was the one who was right on the science for that bit of plot. Since he also did things like invent the idea for communication satellites and was a member of the British Interplanetary Society, it was likely on his capable shoulders that making the scene realistic fell. It would have been interesting to be a fly on the wall as that scene came together, with a great cinematic genius working with somebody explaining the harsh realities of microgravity, explosive decompression (and the velocity that causes Bowman to bounce around), and the very limited window of time in which the human body could get back into the airlock and survive. Then scripting, filming, and editing it together to convey that committed step leading to frantic, chaotic urgency.

The whole movie is a great example of collaboration. It sure wound up as one of the more memorable scenes in a movie packed with memorable scenes.

Comment: Re: What is the Dell CEO supposed to say? (Score 2) 173

by Trinn (#47235839) Attached to: Dell Exec Calls HP's New 'Machine' Architecture 'Laughable'

Its called mmio, mmap() specifically. Linux already has xip support on some platforms as well. This is all under the hood too, the libc could be redesigned, or insert your favorite language here. I agree that writing code optimized for it might be a bit different but its not that different than writing for an all-sram platform like say the old palm.

Comment: Re:Tegra? 4 Lbs? (Score 3, Interesting) 121

by JabberWokky (#47143931) Attached to: HP (Re-)Announces a 14" Android Laptop

I doubt it is just the patents. Add in the price point and the fact that this is a relatively minor product, so there are no fancy retooled factories and a minimum of custom components are going into this, as opposed to in a flagship product. Plus a dozen other little issues that fall under those or add to them. It's basically using cheap components for a cheap price point. The Air uses the absolute latest and best to get to the minimum weight and size, but at a high price point. Sony did that for years as well, and had a similarly high price point relative to the general market of the time.

It is quite a bit underwhelming compared to even higher end Android tablets like the $650 Galaxy Note 12, but the killer feature is probably intended to be what will likely be a $300 and change street price with the ease of Android (for those who already have an Android phone). It's comparable to their Pavillion 14" laptop: http://www.amazon.com//dp/B00B...

Comment: Re:KDE 3 (Score 4, Interesting) 94

by JabberWokky (#47000635) Attached to: KDE Ships First Beta of Next Generation Plasma Workspace

I love KDE4. I use it every day. I can, however, see one issue. My biggest fault with KDE4 was that DCOP in KDE3 was a joy to use from a script (bash script, etc). DBUS is a pain in the butt. It's not only much saltier (in terms of syntactical salt) but it also tends to change much more often. Calls that work in one version don't work after an update. DCOP was more simple, had a great interface, and -- most importantly -- the app interfaces tended to stay stable.

I'm really hoping that the Qt5 and QML combo makes up for this, allowing easy scripting and simple use of internals. I used to say that KDE was like the *nix command line, only GUI: a bunch of small apps that exposed a ton of tiny options that you could link together. KDE4 clearly continued that philosophy with DBUS, but I think it was far less successful in that aspect.

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