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Comment: Re:Not hacking this term is thrown so loosely (Score 1) 378

So we need a new term that refers to the, non-malicious sensible demonstration of system vulnerabilities. Hacking is a violent term and dredges up connotations of evil, or at least intense coughing. How about 'Slacking' - 'Door Pointing' - or 'Hewlett-Turoning' (give the kids some fame!)

Comment: Don't accept bogus data, the temperature is rising (Score 1) 466

by ThePackager (#43210003) Attached to: Why Earth Hour Is a Waste of Time and Energy
Take your politically colored blinders off, Rose produced nothing but propaganda for the anti-science movement. His "official" graph is a fabrication, (see http://www.windows2universe.org/earth/climate/climate_today.html and http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/graphs_v3/ and Rose cites no authorities. Referring back to the main thread - the hour of 'lights out' would be much better spent if everyone sought out ways and actually acted on them consistently to reduce their energy demand. Like cleaning out and turning off that 2nd refrigerator - turning the heat down, unplugging your device charges when you aren't using them, just use less energy, or we're all screwed. Especially future generations.

Comment: We live in a radioactively contaminated world (Score 1) 615

The United States conducted around 1,054 nuclear tests The Soviet Union conducted 715 nuclear tests The United Kingdom has conducted 45 tests France conducted 210 nuclear tests The People's Republic of China conducted 45 tests The official number of Indian nuclear tests is 6 Pakistan conducted 6 official tests, and around 24 nuclear cold tests There may have been several other alleged tests. The increase in background radiation due to these tests peaked in 1963 at about 0.15 mSv per year worldwide, or about 7% of average background dose from all sources.

Comment: High Speed Rail! (Score 1) 421

by ThePackager (#41977565) Attached to: Airlines Face Acute Pilot Shortage
Let's invest in a US transportation infrastructure that * Uses less fuel ( air travel has become more efficient - but so could rail if we made lighter trains * Get's you closer to your destination with less traffic - train stations are usually downtown - airports aren't * No 'pilot problem' * No air traffic controller mayhem * Lots more room to move around on board * Makes lots of JOBS!

Comment: Re:Yeah, right. (Score 2) 253

by ThePackager (#41825749) Attached to: EFF And Others Push For Open Wifi APs Everywhere
I see that the fear reflex is a barrier - but think it through! Ease of access puts fewer roadblocks in terms of nodal connections and the potential exists to even eventually apply a truly different concept to what we understand to be the 'structure' of the Internet. The carriers were given huge regulatory breaks in 1996 to implement high bandwidth but found they could make more money with a choke hold on throughput. The 1996 Act was supposed to foster competition, but instead mergers occurred. the largest four Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers owned less than half of all the lines in the country while five years later the largest four local telephone companies own about 85% of all the lines in the country. In addition instead of market driven entrepreneurship, the effect on the market seen was a reduction in the number of major media companies from around 50 in 1983 to 10 in 1996] and 6 in 2005. The essence of that law's goal is possible with Open WiFi. It may require an redress of the 1996 Act. People like the /. community need to become involved with education of the public on this issue.

Comment: Re:Models are always right! (Score 5, Interesting) 760

by ThePackager (#37981128) Attached to: World Emissions of Carbon Dioxide Outpace Worst-Case Scenario
Fear the data, denier: * every year since 1992 has been warmer than 1992; * the ten hottest years on record occurred in the last 15; * every year since 1976 has been warmer than 1976; * the 20 hottest years on record occurred in the last 25; * every year since 1956 has been warmer than 1956; and * every year since 1917 has been warmer than 1917. The two most reputable globally and seasonally averaged temperature trend analyses are the NASA GISS direct surface temperature analysis and the CRU direct surface temperature analysis. Both trends are definitely and significantly up.

+ - Is the creative class engine sputtering?->

Submitted by
Geoffrey.landis
Geoffrey.landis writes "The "creative class" was supposed to be the new engine of the United States economy, but--according to Scott Timberg, writing in Salon-- that engine is sputtering. While a very few technologists have become very wealthy, for most creative workers, the rise of amateurs and enthusiasts means that few are actually making a living. The new economy is good for the elite who own the servers, but, for most, "the dream of a laptop-powered 'knowledge class' is dead," he says."
Link to Original Source
Software

+ - BitTorrent goes freemium: uTorrent Plus-> 2

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "BitTorrent has just announced a freemium version of uTorrent: uTorrent Plus. It has all of the same features, plus a few very tasty extras: built-in virus scanning (and treatment), an integrated media player, automatic transcoding for devices (smartphones, tablets, consoles), and a version of uTorrent Remote that lets you manage your torrents from anywhere and download the completed files. For now uTorrent Plus is an invite-only beta test, but when it launches it will cost $25 per year."
Link to Original Source
Open Source

+ - A 3D Life - MakerBot gets $10 million in funding (-> 1

Submitted by
ptorrone
ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine sat down with Bre Pettis, founder of the open-source 3D printer, the MakerBot and asked about their recent round of $10 million in funding. What does it mean to have venture capital behind an open source product, what is the future of 3D printing and how many MakerBots are there "in the wild" — all these questions answered and more!
 "

Link to Original Source
IT

+ - does being 'loyal' pay as a developer? 11

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Does loyalty pay as a developer?

As a senior developer for a small IT company based in the UK that is about to release their flagship project, I know that if I was to leave the company now it would cause them some very big problems.

Mostly because I’m currently training the other two ‘junior’ developers , trying to bring them up to speed with our products. Unfortunately however they are still a long way from grasping the technologies used – not to mention the ‘interesting’ job the outsourced developers managed to make of the code (but I’ll leave that for another post)

Usually I would never have considered leaving at such a crucial time, I’ve been at the company for several years and consider many of my colleagues, including higher management, friends.
However I have been approached by another company that is much bigger, and they have offered me a pay rise of £7k to do the same job, plus their office is practically outside my front door (as opposed to my current 45 minute commute each way)

This would make a massive difference to my life, and naturally the other half wants me to snatch their hands off!
But I can’t help but feel that to leave now would be betraying my friends and colleagues, some friends have told me that I’m just being ‘soft’ – however I think I’m being loyal.

Some of you fellow slash-dotters must have had similar experiences over the years, any advice?
thanks"

Lots of folks confuse bad management with destiny. -- Frank Hubbard

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