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+ - Ask Slashdot: Why Do Vendors Stop Selling Old Vers-> 1

Submitted by
temcat
temcat writes "Latest does not necessarily mean greatest, and the world of software is no exception to that. I am sure everybody on Slashdot can cite their favorite example of how the previous version of X was better than the new one. But why do vendors usually stop selling old versions of their software as soon as the latest version comes out? At least they could provide downgrade rights — in any case, they cannot lose on the total revenue. I can imagine three problems here:

- Some implied obligation to support the product. Does such a thing really exist in most places? Surely a vendor can refuse to support old versions in the EULA?

- Increased overhead due to having more SKUs. Is the cost increase that significant, especially for big corporations with wide product portfolios?

- New version release is implemented as a project; if this version does not sell, the project will not pay off, and management heads will roll. I see where the managerial interest lies, but what about shareholders? By not discouraging this tactic, they deprive themselves of vital market feedback about the quality of the new product.

What did I miss? Share your insights."

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+ - 90% of Dice "tech jobs" are fake

Submitted by hoapres
hoapres (2506312) writes "This has been posted over at the Dice discussion board.

90% of Dice job ads are fake.

The majority of the fake ads are due to "broadcasting". A "broadcast" is when multiple agencies are competing for the same job. If 10 agencies advertise on Dice for the same job then Dice counts this as 10 jobs.

http://community.dice.com/t5/Tech-Market-Conditions/Dice-at-it-again-using-the-bogus-job-count-to-claim-tech/m-p/235374

Dice goes around and peddles the bogus job count claiming 84,XXX tech jobs when most likely less than 9,000 jobs actually exist."

Comment: Re:Who is paying for my electricity, anyways? (Score 4, Interesting) 609

by TheOriginalRevdoc (#26363801) Attached to: New Energy Efficiency Rules For TVs Sold In California
You're not paying for the external cost of generating the electricity, which is the problem. Those external costs include mercury and CO2 emissions from coal-fired plants. I suppose if those costs were tacked on to your power bill you'd have a case.

Comment: Re:Extremely unprofitable (Score 2, Insightful) 897

by TheOriginalRevdoc (#26244533) Attached to: Can the Auto Industry Retool Itself To Build Rails?

This isn't Europe, and you can't necessarily repeat the same things that work in Europe and expect them to work here also.

That's not correct. Parts of the US - especially in the north-east - are very much like Europe, and both heavy rail and light rail are viable in those areas. That's also where the bulk of the population lives.

You live in a very big and diverse country. Just because something won't work in rural Arizona or Nebraska doesn't mean it won't work anywhere else.

Comment: Re:Right, because PayPal's better... (Score 2, Informative) 181

by TheOriginalRevdoc (#23772257) Attached to: eBay's Plan to Force PayPal Rejected Down Under
This was outlawed here in Australia a few years ago, so merchants are now free to charge a fee for credit card purchases (which some would call offering a discount for cash).

The main reason for doing this was to make the costs of buying by credit card transparent. Under the old system, credit card providers charged a fee to the merchant, but the fee was hidden from the consumer. The merchants had to absorb this cost by raising prices slightly across the board. That meant that the banks were effectively applying a small sales tax to nearly all retail sales. Estimates varied, but it was generally thought to be around 1% to 2%. It doesn't sound like much, but across every sale in the country, it's a huge amount.

Most big retailers continue to do this, but smaller retailers either have a mimimum amount for credit card purchases, or tack on a fee of around 3%.

Real computer scientists don't comment their code. The identifiers are so long they can't afford the disk space.

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