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Submission + - Brewing an ancient beer provides archaeologists info about migration (forbes.com)

TheAlexKnapp writes: Different groundwater supplies in different geographic regions often have different oxygen isotope ratios. Archaeologists have been using this fact to help track migration patterns in ancient cultures by examining oxygen isotope ratios found in human bones. But there may be a catch to this — namely, humans don't only drink water. They often drank alcohol instead. Anthropology students at Wagner college brewed chicha de maíz, an ancient Peruivan corn beer, and discovered that its oxygen isotope ratios are different from the water it was brewed with. Since ancient Peruvians drank a LOT of chicha, archaeologists need to properly consider this consumption when they're trying to reconstruct migrations..

Submission + - The ethical issues surrounding OSU's lab-grown brains (forbes.com)

TheAlexKnapp writes: Last month, researchers at Ohio State University announced they'd created a "a nearly complete human brain in a dish that equals the brain maturity of a 5-week-old fetus." In the press release, the University hailed this as an "ethical" way to test drugs for neurological disorders. Philosopher Janet Stemwedel, who notes that she works in "the field where we’ve been thinking about brains in vats for a very long time" highlights some of the ethical issues around this new technology. "We should acknowledge," she says. "that the ethical use of lab-grown human brains is nothing like a no-brainer."

Submission + - Chemical evidence shows the Nazis weren't at all close to having the bomb (forbes.com)

TheAlexKnapp writes: The Nazis winning World War II by getting the bomb first is a staple of alt-history and it's the reason why James T. Kirk lost the love of his life, Edith Keeler. Einstein also noted possible German efforts to build one in his letter to FDR urging the U.S. develop an atomic weapon. But it turns out there really wasn't a race to build a bomb at all. Materials from Germany's atomic weapons program have been studied by an international team of researchers, who determined that Germany never achieved a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction — something that Fermi and his colleagues had accomplished in 1942 — which was a key step to actually building an atomic weapon. This chemical evidence supports other historical accounts that the German atomic program never achieved this result.

Submission + - Why The Black Hole Information Paradox Is Such A Problem (forbes.com)

TheAlexKnapp writes: Really nice explanation of the Information Paradox for those who are unfamiliar with it. Lays out the basic gist — that right now if you take two black holes, one made from the collapse of one type of star, and the second from the collapse of a different type, you can't tell which is which. Rightly points out that Hawking's big announcement was really just a small step heading towards a possible solution, and highlights that the paradox highlights the incompleteness of our understanding of some types of Physics.

Comment The Author speaks (and cringes a bit) (Score 5, Informative) 133

All - author of the piece speaking here. Yes, I'm aware of the D-Wave controversies, and talked with Scott Aaronson in a later piece at the time of the announcement. I'm cringing a little bit as I re-read this post because I know a heck of a lot more about quantum computing now than I did then. My take on D-Wave's computer now is that it's probably not a 'true' quantum computer in the sense that it involves any quantum speedup or entanglement. That said, I think that their annealing process is interesting in and of itself. I see their quantum computing tag as being akin to calling something '4G' in the wireless world. For those more interested in quantum computing, I updated the post to include some of the Q&A's I did about D-Wave at the time, as well as some of the quantum computing research I've covered since then, including some conversations with quantum computing researchers.

The opossum is a very sophisticated animal. It doesn't even get up until 5 or 6 PM.