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Comment: Not quite the end yet (Score 2, Informative) 1173

by The Evil Evil Muppet (#15520767) Attached to: The End of Native Code?
At this point, there is still a lot of development happening in "native" languages. Additionally, there are projects in motion to turn bytecode from environments like Java and Python into native code. One of the reasons a lot of people are seeing this seemingly massive movement is because of the technologies these "non-native" solutions leverage. Take both Java and .Net - the support libraries are huge and designed to (more or less) work together. All of that said, I'm a bit sick of either having to put up with the limitations of some of the languages that end up as native code or distributing some runtime environment with my app that immediately gives my users an impression of my product. For that reason, I've started to use D - http://blogs.itoperations.com.au/chris/software/la nguages/language-choice-is-a-compromise/. If you can't be bothered reading my convoluted blog (there's more coming on the subject, along with a project release in coming weeks), go on over to the language's home - http://www.digitialmars.com/d/index.html. It has the vast majority of C++'s features (and more), Java/C#-style syntax and ease whilst compiling to native code.

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