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Comment: Re:Getters and setters (Score 1) 543

by T-Ranger (#44301237) Attached to: Visual Studio vs. Eclipse: a Programmer's Comparison
Presuming you can trivially create the getters/setters, the advantage is that once created, any future customizations to accessing/setting data on that object doesn't require any refactoring of code that does those things. While its possible to refactor simple blah->property17 to blah->getProperty17() in _your own code_, its not at all possible to do for external users.

Might as well setup the access methods early. And with autogenerated methods, no reason not to.

Comment: Re:Leave the units alone (Score 1) 909

by T-Ranger (#42444949) Attached to: USMA: Going the Extra Kilometer For Metrication
If you called it a "bob" then people would think of bob-wide walls. The convention is simply wrong. A 2x4 isn't within any realistic tolerance of 2"x4". They are all cut to a reasonable tolerance of 1.5"x3.5". So, wrong by 25%! It isn't like half the "2x4"s that one buys are larger then the described size.

Its marketing. Technology to cut wood [in a factory setting] got cleaner and more accurate over time. Lumbar lines could have gotten more accurate and closer to the actual advertised size, but at every opportunity to refine the standard, the actual size was reduced.

And "two inches less a sixteenth" in metric is easy. 74.6125 mm. Or if your example is really "how to say 1 minor tick less then the major ticks on this measuring device", "4 less 1" is 3.9.

Comment: Re:Can we get a real Linux filesystem, please? (Score 1) 210

by T-Ranger (#42301747) Attached to: Denial-of-Service Attack Found In Btrfs File-System
If you ... your employer ... are prepared to spend money, then why not spend money? I mean, and this is a serious question, why not go with something like a EMC VNX or VNXe? Byte for byte of real physical storage SANs are pretty expensive, I grant, but the features can oft make up for that.

Comment: Re:No work life balance at Google (Score 1) 215

by T-Ranger (#40457493) Attached to: Google Vs. Microsoft: a Tale of Two Interviews
That is a pretty small sample size - and easily explained away. Was he a student before being a Googler? You always have more time as a student. Did he previously have a fairly normal 9-5 gig, fixed salary, no profit sharing or options? Maybe he wants to work harder for a company he has some long term financial investment in. Was his previous job something very mechanical, pumping out stupid, never to be read TPS reports? At Google, maybe he is doing something which is constantly hours away from being visible by millions of people. Maybe he is planning on working his ass of for 5 years, and retiring.

Comment: SSH (Score 1) 243

by T-Ranger (#37011032) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Does SSL Validation Matter?
There is a model of how to have an encrypted system replace its clear-text equivalent. SSH.

Math nerds are just making everything too complicated. Yes, there may be some technical perfection which we can strive for, in version 3.0 Version 1 is just totally fucked, it is both unsuccessful at being perfect, both technically and politically, and is just too fucking hard. Make 2.0 work, and work everywhere. When faced with a technical question, see what SSH does.

http://ask.slashdot.org/story/11/08/06/1841210/Ask-Slashdot-Does-SSL-Validation-Matter#We can solve 90% of the problem basically overnight, and put those bloodsucking extortionists out of business. Do what SSH does.

Comment: Re:Sweet Lord No (Score 1) 1173

by T-Ranger (#36660202) Attached to: Roundabout Revolution Sweeping US
In addition to changing the circle itself, over the past 5 years they have also added a 3rd lane to both Chebucto (reversible) and the Bay Rd.

Traffic volumes have increased. I think that goes without saying. Maybe down in the past couple of years with gas prices and slightly better transit, but the 2000s are higher then the '80s.

It is always backed up at rush hour now, and it was before, too. But so is North St getting onto the bridge, and the Joe Howe interchange getting to the other bridge or the Bedford highway, and the 102/Joe Howe lights getting onto the 102. Fortunately, as much as we like to bitch, rush hour doesn't even last an hour. Try getting off Manhattan, at 4:30....

Meh, anyway. The guys with the iron rings hire high school students to count cars. All the statistics say that roundabouts are better in general, and specifically in Armdale too.

Indecently, they are adding/converting to roundabouts a lot in NS. The new interchange on the 102 for Bedford west has no less than 3 roundabouts within 500m. I don't know what has happened with the rotary at Picto, the one at the causway hasn't changed, but given its grade changes, it has had special rules and been barely recognizable as a circle for ever.

Comment: Re:Sweet Lord No (Score 1) 1173

by T-Ranger (#36654876) Attached to: Roundabout Revolution Sweeping US
It used to be a rotary, with lights. Now it is a roundabout, without lights. And it is unquestionably better now.

When a "rotary" the main circle had two concentric lanes. And traffic entering the circle had the right of way. Traffic in the circle having the right of way is so mindbogglingly stupid it isn't worth further discussion. Anyway: concentric lanes means that to use the inside lane, you need to cross traffic twice: once to get in, and once to leave. When at all busy, the outside lane cars really have no chance at all to see signals, so changing to the outside lane, and especially crossing lanes to leave was borderline impossible.

With a "roundabout", the lanes are nested spirals. And you choose your exit when you enter, the lanes are clearly marked with overhead signs. You only cross traffic once, entering. Which means usually from a stopped position (unless there is no traffic, and then it doesn't matter). So the one question of dangerous movement you make when stopped. Leaving the circle happens automatically, as the spiral lanes leave the circle.

The rotary did have lights, but these were necessary given that design. The lightless roundabout is slightly more efferent then the signaled rotary it replaced. All the engineers and city planners were on the record that lights could return, if necessary.

Oh, did I forget to mention that the rotary was not fully operational all the time? I did.... During rush hours some of the entrance/exit options were blocked off by a commissionaire. Unless you were a taxi or a bus, you couldn't exit onto Quinpool during the afternoon rush.

As is, better than before. Safer, easier, more functional. Without the cost of lights and commissionaires (which, I grant, are pretty minimal).

Murphy's Law, that brash proletarian restatement of Godel's Theorem. -- Thomas Pynchon, "Gravity's Rainbow"

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