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Comment: UK and US snooping (Score 1) 256

by Stoopiduk (#45608879) Attached to: NSA Tracking Cellphone Locations Worldwide

So many times I've read US comments on Slashdot regarding privacy and how awful it is in the UK because of our camera coverage.

Ha! You were getting stiffed the whole time too! You weren't even getting the remote chance of video evidence to protect the innocent, just a blanket government surveillance of your online activity to protect against a largely government-engineered threat.

Now that we're both screwed, can we quiet-down on the finger pointing across ponds, and start pointing elsewhere?

Comment: Re:A big boat eh? (Score 2) 166

by Stoopiduk (#45606899) Attached to: World's Largest Ship Floated For the First Time

Yup, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has a growing list of environmental regulations that apply to every ship in the world.

Most people will be surprised how good oil companies are when it comes to employing decent, environmental sound ships for their projects. Generally the majors don't have their own fleets now, so charter in tonnage, and have very high standards and a ridiculous number of inspections for the vessels they employ.

Admittedly, this is largely because they have caused some huge catastrophes in the past.

Comment: Re:Worlds biggest shipyards (Score 1) 166

by Stoopiduk (#45606849) Attached to: World's Largest Ship Floated For the First Time

Tankers represent 2% of Samsung's current backlog according to their IR report.

If we take super tanker to mean VLCC, that's anything over 200,000dwt (ULCCs are around 320,000 dwt, so I'm being generous). If they were churning out 100, that would be 20,000,000 dwt per annum.

According to Braemar Seascope, global tanker deliveries for all tankers over 27,000 dwt peaked at just under 55,000,000 dwt in 2011, with around 32,000,000 dwt in deliveries expected this year, not accounting for slippage. Samsung are not producing 100 super tankers a year.

Deletions from the fleet are under 10,000,000 dwt per annum. Overcapacity is already bad, I'm glad we don't live in the world that documentary was covering.

Comment: Re:Worlds biggest shipyards (Score 2) 166

by Stoopiduk (#45606719) Attached to: World's Largest Ship Floated For the First Time

That's not how shipbuilding works. The cheapest labour is not a way to success. Chinese yards are generally not as successful as the Korean and Singaporean yards that pay better, are more efficient and more advanced.

Ship owners can ill-afford to have shoddily-built ships anymore, especially in the tanker sector if they're looking to work with the oil majors.

Comment: Re:Yah... stupid much? (Score 2) 166

by Stoopiduk (#45606647) Attached to: World's Largest Ship Floated For the First Time

Commenter specifically said the area around it, not the whole ocean.

You don't bed down subsea apparatus, anchor the largest floating structure in the world, start offloading shuttle tankers full of LNG and transport supplies and crew for such a installtion without affecting the surrounding ecology in some way.

I for one welcome the curiosity of the original post over your off-topic twitter-bashing and (hopefully) deliberate misinterpretation of the commenter's point.

Comment: Re:amazing indeed (Score 1) 166

by Stoopiduk (#45606077) Attached to: World's Largest Ship Floated For the First Time

Interesting question - the mooring points are likely to have a direct impact wherever they're attached to the seabed, as will all of the subsea equipment and the engineering work to secure them in place.

The platform itself will, I imagine, have a minimal impact aside from noise and vibration. There have been whispers of regulating ship noise and vibration for the protection of the marine environment at IMO for some time, but nothing has come forward yet or is likely to in the next couple of years.

There will be increased marine traffic from shuttle tankers and crew/support vessels, but oil majors are largely pretty careful about the vessels they employ, especially for a project with as high profile as this.

Once it's in place, I doubt we'll ever hear too much about prelude, unless it goes horribly, horribly wrong.

Comment: Re:Dream on. (Score 1) 292

by Stoopiduk (#43515711) Attached to: Omnidirectional Treadmill: The Ultimate FPS Input Device?

Sounds like motion sickness/seasickness. The way I had it explained to me was that it was a mechanism to deal with poisons. Your senses give conflicting information on balance and what you're seeing, or the input is just plain alien, so your body reacts by assuming you've been poisoned and it hits the eject button.

    Not preaching this, happy to be told otherwise. Luckily if it is similar to seasickness, three constant days of it should see you straightened out.

    Better find a handy place to hotkey all of my abilities ready for Azeroth. Perhaps I could hardwire them into a suck bucket? Moisture sensor at the bottom linked to feign death might be a start.

Comment: Re:Let Me Explain (Score 1) 550

by Stoopiduk (#42647275) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Do I Get My Spouse To Start Gaming With Me?

My other half has very little interest in games beyond puzzle games on her mobile or FB, but my four year old son has a great time watching me play Minecraft. I never envisaged being forced to play video games by my child, but I'm sure as hell not complaining. He enjoys watching me create buildings and machines and I make a point of using the game to help with his reading and some problem solving.

He independently plays games on his tablet, and we often take turns on games like Angry birds and Cut the Rope. I don't think he's quite capable of grasping wasd and mouse yet, but I can't wait until he does!

TL;DR - Why not try seeing if your kids like video games?

Hardware

+ - Ask Slashdot: Internet Access for the Elderly

Submitted by
Stoopiduk
Stoopiduk writes "My grandmother is in her late seventies and almost housebound. She's lucky enough to have frequent visits from family, but spends most of her time alone watching DVDs. As her mobility continues to decrease, simple tasks like her weekly trip to the supermarket become more difficult. She's expressed an interest in getting a laptop for online shopping and keeping in touch with family, but worries how she might cope as she has painful arthritis in her wrists and fingers. How should I go about getting her online? Is a laptop the right answer or a tablet? How do you teach someone with no knowledge of the internet how to stay safe online? Have any of you ever helped someone in a similar situation? Are there any major benefits to being online for the elderly that I've overlooked?"

1 Billion dollars of budget deficit = 1 Gramm-Rudman

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