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+ - German Wikipedia Has Problems With Paid Editing -- And Threats Of Violence 2

Submitted by metasonix
metasonix (650947) writes "As German journalist Marvin Oppong learned recently, there are a number of people who work to make articles about certain corporations and trade groups on German Wikipedia "look better". And when Oppong published his discoveries, one reaction was an openly violent threat, aimed at him, posted on de-WP's "Kurier" noticeboard. Just as with English Wikipedia, it is apparently a "terrible crime" to criticize German Wikipedia, even when Jimbo Wales's "bright line" rule on paid editing is being violated. Unlike English WP, the Germans will threaten to "curbstone" people for saying it."

+ - Major Wikipedia donors caught editing their own articles 7

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "As reported before on Slashdot, one of the most terrible sins on Wikipedia is to edit articles for pay, or otherwise violate the "neutral point of view" policy, per their co-founder Jimmy Wales. And yet, the Wikipedia-criticism website Wikipediocracy has recently performed a study showing that a large percentage of the Wikimedia Foundation's largest cash donors have violated that policy. Repeatedly, and wantonly. In short, they wrote articles about themselves or their companies, then gave the WMF big donations — and were not confronted about violating the NPOV policy. It reeks of outright favoritism. The first installment of an upcoming multi-part series discusses the co-creator of Cards Against Humanity, and his blatant editing of the Wikipedia article about his card game, followed by a $70,000 donation to the WMF. An honest donation, or hush money?"

Comment: COI is inevitable (Score 1) 7

by Stanistani (#46453193) Attached to: Major Wikipedia donors caught editing their own articles
Most anyone interested enough to navigate the hostile waters of Wikipedia has an interest in a subject, either through employment, advocacy, or just plain liking or disliking the topic of an article. The ‘Bright Line’ rule is doomed, as paid editing and advocacy is already rampant in Wikipedia. It’s time to manage this, not demonize it. I’m looking forward to subsequent chapters in this COI saga.

+ - Why do people add to Wikipedia? Sometimes it's pure self-indulgence.-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Uncounted thousands of people have added content to "the encyclopedia anyone can edit". And this has been celebrated as a success of the "open web". However, Wikipedia also has a number of very serious flaws, from paid editors to corporate promotion to self-centered "autobiographies". Not to mention bizarre biases, resulting from political battles and obsessive attention to minor subjects such as highways, storms and videogaming. Or the Wikimedia Foundation's apparent push in favor of more traffic, not content quality. A new Wikipediocracy article summarizes some of the worst abuses. These disputes are rarely discussed outside Wikipedia circles, and are only the tip of the iceberg."
Link to Original Source
Wikipedia

+ - Wikimedia UK's chair banned...from Wikipedia-> 3

Submitted by
Larry Sanger
Larry Sanger writes "The Chair of Wikimedia UK, a £1 million charity independent of the Wikimedia Foundation, was banned 11 days ago, for allegedly posting bondage porn of himself and otherwise violating Wikipedia policies. So he was removed as head of WMUK, right? Er, no. On July 26, their Board declared their "united" support of Van Haeften. So the chair of Wikipedia's UK £1 million charity is not permitted to edit Wikipedia. The Chair of the UK's Wikipedia charity is not permitted to edit Wikipedia. So this immediately became a big scandal, right? Er, no. Wikipedia routinely gets a pass for its many foibles. The first mainstream story to appear about it came out just this morning in the Telegraph. More background here."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Toothbrush (Score 1) 3

by Stanistani (#40176527) Attached to: What should we do about Wikipedia's porn problem?
Without the image filter (something all other major sites have) if you search on Wikipedia or Wikimedia Commons for normal, everyday items such as' necklace', 'toothbrush' or, in French, 'homework' (devoir) you get as your top or second hit, porn. Children are encouraged to use these resources. Teens are often admin on these sites, cataloging and categorizing the porn. Yech.
Wikipedia

+ - What should we do about Wikipedia's porn problem?-> 3

Submitted by
Larry Sanger
Larry Sanger writes "In 2011, the Wikimedia Board committed to installing a "controversial content" filter even weaker than Google's SafeSearch, as proposed by the "2010 Wikimedia Study of Controversial Content." Since then, after growing opposition by some Wikipedians, some board members have made it clear that they do not expect this filter to be finished and installed. Nevertheless, as TFA makes clear, Wikipedia continues to host an enormous amount of extremely gross porn and other material most parents don't want their kids stumbling across. And this content is some of the website's most-accessed. Nevertheless, children remain some of Wikipedia's heaviest users. Jimmy Wales has recently reiterated his support for such a filter, but no work is being done on it, and the Foundation has not yet issued any statement about whether they intend to continue work on it."
Link to Original Source
Earth

+ - Chinese Dragon Explores .67 Leagues Under the Sea

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "Earlier this summer when three Chinese scientists descended to a depth of more than 0.6 leagues under the sea in a craft the size of a small truck and planted their nation’s flag on the dark seabed at 3,759 meters, they signaled Beijing's intention to take the lead in exploring remote and inaccessible parts of the ocean floor which are rich in oil, minerals and other resources that the Chinese would like to mine. "They're in it for a penny and a pound," says Dr. Don Walsh, a pioneer of deep-ocean diving. "It's a very deliberate program." The global seabed is littered with what experts say is trillions of dollars' worth of mineral nodules as well as many objects of intelligence value: undersea cables carrying diplomatic communications, lost nuclear arms, sunken submarines and hundreds of warheads left over from missile tests. The small craft that made the trip — named Jiaolong, after a mythical sea dragon — is meant to go as deep as 7,000 meters, or 4.35 miles, edging out the current global leader but China is moving cautiously, its dives going deeper in increments. "They're being very cautious," Walsh adds. "They respect what they don't know and are working hard to learn."""

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