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Comment: Re:Street view... (Score 1) 140

by Sobrique (#47654367) Attached to: Google's Satellites Could Soon See Your Face From Space
Especially now a UAV capable of carrying some quite high quality camera hardware is actually pretty cheap. I've been admiring the 8 rotor which can take a decent SLR on a gimbal. It's not exactly cheap by 'home user' standards, but it's a comparable price to the camera it's carrying. Compare to the price of a satellite and launch though... there's really no contest.

Comment: Re:As long as certain rules are kept (Score 1) 383

by Sobrique (#47646513) Attached to: DARPA Wants To Kill the Password
Most biometrics do stop working when you die. Retinal prints change if there's no blood flow - the 'eyeball-on-a-pencil' just doesn't work. Other methods ... well, generally you can detect a pulse, and the change in pattern from the blood pressure is more secure anyway. (Even before you decide you don't want to let zombies^Wresidual human resources in.)

Comment: PKI SSL (Score 2) 383

by Sobrique (#47646447) Attached to: DARPA Wants To Kill the Password
We're used to using SSL from client to server. But it works both ways around. You can use client side SSL certificates to authenticate. Client side SSL certificates that you can lock down with a decent passphrase, SSLVerifyClient

Not as hard to implement as some of the pipe dreams out there. Of course, it does require a degree of tech savvy on the part of users - and more importantly, enforcing it's use, to avoid laziness bypassing.

Then your challenge becomes certificate transport - you'll need a way to carry around your cert, or somehow get hold of it when you need it, which is easier said than done. The real advantage of passwords is their portability. Biometrics have a similar advantage, but as already noted - are a bit harder to revoke/change.

Comment: Re:Automate them (Score 1) 228

by Sobrique (#47629211) Attached to: What Do You Do When Your Mind-Numbing IT Job Should Be Automated?
I've espoused the doctrine of proactive laziness since I started sysadminnning. I figure I'm doing my very best work when there's nothing that I need to be doing, and I can be spending my time fiddling with the next thing.
That means applying appropriate automation and scripting. (Don't overdo it - not all scripts need to be gold plated).
Decent documentation. (Which is easier: explaining or fixing a problem, or saying 'RTFM' and waving a hand dismissively - if TFM is up to scratch, they won't come back and bother you)
Tackle tasks that'll become a pain, before they're a pain.
The combination of these means I've had a fairly easy and productive live in 'systems admin', because I've never had a need to diddle with spreadsheets to look like I'm working.

Comment: Re:Automate them (Score 2) 228

by Sobrique (#47629195) Attached to: What Do You Do When Your Mind-Numbing IT Job Should Be Automated?
Lots of people 'play spreadsheets' all day, which is working really inefficiently. Some companies prefer this, because they operate on billable hours in the first place. You being efficient costs them money. Some companies know better, and will value your skills. You should go and work for those. Getting laid off sucks a bit, but it's far from the worst thing that'll ever happen to you.

Comment: Re:And who the fuck will maintain it? (Score 1) 228

by Sobrique (#47629171) Attached to: What Do You Do When Your Mind-Numbing IT Job Should Be Automated?
Scripts are generally more accessible, but that's about it when it comes to comparison with other languages. That means you get some pretty bad scripts, but ... well, there's no real reason to not use decent coding practice. The core one being 'get everyone involved a working knowledge of the language'.

The 11 is for people with the pride of a 10 and the pocketbook of an 8. -- R.B. Greenberg [referring to PDPs?]

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