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Comment Neither - for what *I* need (Score 1) 121

I've just been investigating this very question. I'm develop a tertiary course in "software engineering process". Small teams will need to work together to build *something*. For a variety of reasons, we think that building an embedded system would be a good thing for them to have exposure to, so I'm trying to find a suitable platform to develop on. The current Raspberry Pi and Beaglebone Black both have their strengths and weaknesses, but both would do for the job. But they both cost at least 50 AUD, which is affordable but not equivalent to zero for planning purposes. By contrast, both the C.H.I.P. and the Pi zero are so cheap that the cost can be ignored. However, both platforms require you to break out the soldering iron if you want to attach things to the GPIO ports. By the time you have something you can hook things up to without soldering, you're back up to the cost of a standard Pi anyway.

Comment Not the first full recovery from space (Score 1) 121

SpaceShip One touched space and all elements were recovered and flew to space again.

BO's demonstration is more publicity than practical rocketry. It doesn't look like the aerodynamic elements of BO's current rocket are suitable for recovery after orbital injection, just after a straight up-down space tourism flight with no potential for orbit, just like SpaceShip One (and Two). They can't put an object in space and have it stay in orbit. They can just take dudes up for a short and expensive view and a little time in zero gee.

It's going to be real history when SpaceX recovers the first stage after an orbital injection, in that it will completely change the economics of getting to space and staying there.

Comment Re:Institutional Knowledge (Score 1) 169

I've been pondering that subject lately. If what you say is true, then shouldn't the company with the experienced employees and the institutional knowledge have a competitive advantage in their markets? I would have thought that advantage would have manifested fairly early as the quality of the shoddy competitors declines, but I haven't seen such a trend. I'd also expect the advantage to widen as the companies composed of nothing but temps loses institutional knowledge over time. Again, not seeing it.

Continuing on with my hypothesis, shouldn't the experienced employees be able to easily form a new company and drive the outsourcing ones out of the industry? I'm starting to see a few hints of that through anecdotal evidence, but not enough to draw conclusions yet.

Comment Which Is To Say (Score 1) 110

A third if their time coming up with new corporate password rules, a third of their time architecting the Citrix solution that is going to propel the company into the brave future of 1998 and a third of their time requiring their employees to get training on whatever the bandwagon buzzword of the month is (This quarter it's Rally/Agile/Scrum.) You know, honestly, the company would be a lot better off if a freak software error caused that guy to fall down an elevator shaft.

Comment Re:Another in a long series of marketing mistakes (Score 1) 137

You'd need a popular product to pull off obtaining second-clientage from governments, and you'd need not to reveal that your device had legal intercept.

This is just a poorly-directed company continuing to shoot itself in the foot. It's not made its product desirable for government, or for anyone else.

Comment Small print (Score 4, Informative) 33

Amazon Studios will grow and evolve over time. As it does, we'll need to adapt the terms of this Agreement. Unless we otherwise note at the time of posting, changes to this Agreement will be effective immediately upon posting. You accept changes by using Amazon Studios after we have posted changes or, if we provide you a means of indicating your acceptance online, by clicking to confirm acceptance.

In order to prevent legal claims that could be disruptive to Amazon Studios participants and impede the ability of Amazon scripts, movies, shows and videos to be developed and released, you agree to irrevocably and forever waive any legal claim you may have under any theory of law in any territory, including, without limitation, copyright infringement or breach of implied in fact contract (idea submission), that your rights were infringed due to any similarity between your Content and any other content that is or may become available on Amazon, unless there is substantial similarity of protectable expression under United States copyright law between your Content and the other content and the other content includes a verbatim copy of a material portion of your script or other written material, if your Content is a script or other written material, or a re-use of a material portion of footage from your movie, show or other video if your Content is a movie, show, or other video. Note that the Account Agreement includes additional waivers of claims related to Content that apply to the Amazon Parties, as defined in Section 11.4 below.

9. Compensation. You will have no right to compensation in connection with the exploitation of rights you grant under this Agreement.

I'm not sure WHAT they could possibly change to rape screenwriters harder, in this, but by God if they think of something, you've already agreed to it! :D

And so another field of human endeavor is Uber-fied

All programmers are playwrights and all computers are lousy actors.