Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Scumbags (Score 2, Informative) 644

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#27489921) Attached to: Konami Announces a Game Based On a 2004 Battle In Fallujah

In the next 4 to 6 years when you finally go to college I strongly suggest you take some (Inter)National Security courses and some history courses.

For one thing aside from the moral issues attacking civilian targets during WWII was never a particularly effective tactic. The reason Britain wasn't crushed by the Nazi's is that once they had air superiority the Nazi's switched to civilian targets. This allowed Britain to rebuild it's devastated military and simply fanned the flames of nationalistic pride.

When the tide turned and the allies started bombing civilian targets the same was true. Germany was able to hold out a lot longer because the reduction of pressure on it's military infrastructure.

If you are looking for a war won by the USA after WWII look no farther then the Gulf War. It accomplished everything necessary to safe guard the US's interests. Going any farther would have been against the US's interest and landed us in the mess we are in now. Keeping Iraq intact was also important because it's primary enemy was actually Iran.

Comment: Re:other potential things (Score 1) 433

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#27485533) Attached to: Nine Words From Science Which Originated In Science Fiction

I don't believe all sci-fi happens in the future. I believe there are a few stories that explore the origin of life on earth for instance or time travel into the past. An example off the top of my head is Dr. Who. Which I think qualifies as sci-fi, at least somewhat. Though I agree Star Wars flows strongly with fantasy and the prequels flow strongly with drivel.

Video might have killed the radio star, but Lucas killed part of my childhood.

Comment: Re:Friendly BSD Projects Vs. Hostile GPL Pricks (Score 1) 176

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#27000019) Attached to: Android Gathers Steam Among Open Source Developers

My armchair understanding of the GPL issue is that a certain company would like to break some of the GPLed apps.

If the code within an app breaks it's own license how can they enforce it on others.

Or protect if from external attack?

Though I should mention I don't deal with em, I just use em(their apps I mean.).

Comment: Re:Accounts need 2 access no's: In & Out #'s (Score 1) 67

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#26948825) Attached to: Uncle Sam's Travel Site Grounded By Breach

Perhaps I'm simply not understanding what you are proposing.

#1 Use this number to make a purchase

#2 Use this number to make a payment

If someone steals #1 they can make purchases in my/your name right?

Example: You go to local-mart and make a purchase using number #1. (Yes, I just said number, number.) Cashier copies number #1, goes to online-mart, and makes some purchases. I don't see how having 2 or 3 numbers would keep someone from abusing one of them? (Of course the last step is the cashier going to jail.)

Perhaps I am missing something?

Comment: Re:Accounts need 2 access no's: In & Out #'s (Score 2, Interesting) 67

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#26948771) Attached to: Uncle Sam's Travel Site Grounded By Breach

You may be right about which one is secure. (Answer: neither.)

But, if you use American Express they will really help you with purchase problems/charge back. (Had em rape a camera vendor once.) And other credit cards will help to varying degrees. And if you are renting a car you usually get free insurance. Then there are frequent flyer miles you get with purchases.

Do checking accounts offer any of these? If so I would really like to know.

And in the end I carry a piece of thin plastic vs a rather thick bundle of paper.

With a few credit/bank cards, about $20-$60 in cash, IDs, I use a mini-wallet and have space to spare.
Mine is similar to this one:
http://www.hotref.com/Wenger-Leather-Card-Wallet-p-3643.html

My whole wallet ends up being 1/2 to 1/3 what others carry.

Comment: Re:Accounts need 2 access no's: In & Out #'s (Score 1) 67

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#26948105) Attached to: Uncle Sam's Travel Site Grounded By Breach

Your system solves nothing.

In this case, if they where using your system, they would get the account number needed to write checks OUT. Since this IS a booking service. The thieves can now get cash out of your account. Are you really that worried about thieves depositing money INTO your account?

#3 Seems like some kind of check bounce protection. They already do the same thing with Credit Cards without needed an extra number. But banks don't want to change anything since they get free money from any bounced checks and check protection "services".

Anyways, I use checks so rarely that when I have to use one it takes me embarrassingly long to remember how to do it. I pay everything with my credit card. A credit card has more security, better features, more fraud protection, and builds my credit. So, why use a check?

Comment: Re:Of course they are making money (Score 1) 315

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#26914531) Attached to: Microsoft Says No Profit In Vista-XP Downgrades

The anger with Office 2007 came from all the MS Office users who needed more functionality then New/Save/Spell check/Print. If you used any of the intermediate functionality good luck finding it and making it work.

Oh, and Mac OS 10 didn't break compatibility with OS 9 (I used Mac OS 9 apps on Mac OS 10 for years. Backwards compatibility was only broken when Apple switched to an Intel based hardware platform.

At first I hated Mac OS 10, but once they fixed it up a little I found it much faster to navigate then Mac OS 9.

I've been using mostly Windows XP and then Vista for the last 6 years, however On the rare occasions I use a Mac I find Mac OS 10 faster and easier to navigate it than XP/Vista. Though I do wish Mac OS 10 would allow you to copy/paste files.(It still doesn't, right?)

Comment: Re:one catch (Score 1) 874

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#26914441) Attached to: Don't Like EULAs? Get Your Cat To Agree To Them

Why do they have to sign it? If an EULA is valid without being signed, then this would be too.

Why the double standard?

(I'm not a lawyer and I don't even play one on TV.)

I as far as I know, a contract doesn't HAVE to be signed to be enforceable. Signing a contract is more like closing a dead bolt. All you need to do is to be able to prove all parties agree to the contract. A good example would be a recording of a verbal contract. Nothing is written not even the contract and of course no signature. If all the requirements for a contract are met then the contract would be enforceable.

One would need to be careful since each State has different legal requirements for accepting recorded evidence. For instance in NY State all parties involved must be informed that they are being recorded.

In the case of EULAs you clicked the "Agree" button so you agree to the contract. The proof you agreed is you couldn't install the software without agreeing to the contract.

For your own EULA to work you would want to have a company employee click "agree" on your own EULA. Though you could always try the automated response route. I good luck with that. ;P

Comment: Re:NO DRM! Can you hear us now? (Score 1) 244

by SmokeyTheBalrog (#25973599) Attached to: EMA Suggests Point-Of-Sale Game Activation To Fight Piracy
Talking about an optimist falling from the skyscraper reminds of the pessimist falling from a skyscraper.

Every few floors he tells himself, "I'm cold, it's windy, and the view is worse"

And *that* reminds of the one about the realist falling from a skyscraper

Every few floors he says, "AAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh"

So... did you ever wonder, do garbagemen take showers before they go to work?

Working...