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Comment Re:Work with cloned mice (Score 1) 203 203

You only need to know how individual neurons work in order to produce artificial ones, and a process to replace existing ones with artificial ones. You certainly don't need to understand how the mind works in order to gradually transfer consciousness from a biological brain to an artificial one.

You're basically right, though practically... in order to transfer the program on a computer while it's running, when it has not been built with the ability to transfer, (no copy command!) you'd need to know (as a bare minimum,) the physical structure of the computer, or brain in this case. You'd need to make a neuron-by-neuron copy, since one of the ways in which the brain is unlike a conventional, digital electronic computer,...

No.

Your assumption is not correct, and the rest of your post, being based in an incorrect assumption, is also wrong. The brain doesn't need to "have been built" with the ability to transfer or copy itself, and we don't need a perfect, "neuron-by-neuron" copy. Brain cells die and are born every day by the thousands and we do just fine.

We don't need to know and understand the whole physical structure of the brain, and we certainly don't need to understand the mind. We only need to understand and be able to replicate the components the brain is made of: neurons. If you can replicate a neuron, and manage to develop a process to replace existing ones (granted, with all their axons and connections), then you can gradually completely replace a natural brain with an artificial one, without impact to the mind it supports.

Comment Re:Work with cloned mice (Score 1) 203 203

I agree with you to an extent -- consciousness is processing sensory information and stored memories -- but what is unconsciousness? It's more than being "off"/dead, but it's less than being conscious. I'd love to be able to sleep only when I wanted (and always when I wanted, for that matter), but we don't really know much about what sleep is, and yet most living creatures spend a significant amount of time doing it.

I don't know the processes of the conscious/unconscious mind. I could try and guess, but without a background in neurology that would be pointless.

In any case, that doesn't matter for the purpose of gradually replacing a natural brain with an artificial one.

Comment Re:Work with cloned mice (Score 1) 203 203

He wasn't talking about awareness or sentience, those are what you are talking about. He was talking about consciousness (the experiencing of existence/environment). For instance; an AI built on current cpus etc could potentially be aware or even sentient but it could never be conscious,

You're confusing terms. Awareness implies consciousness. I guess you meant something different. Can you please explain again?

... it could never actually experience existence such as the color blue, because there is nothing in a cpu designed to produce physical consciousness.

There is nothing in you with the purpose of generating consciousness either. It just emerges from the interaction of billions of neurons.

Perhaps once the physical components and required conditions for consciousness are fully known and verified we could create a system where a digital mind is connected to the consciousness device and a feedback loop created to simulate us. But until then no.

I disagree. And your proposed solution (single-step mind transfer to an external device) will mean death for the original mind anyway.

Comment Re:Work with cloned mice (Score 2) 203 203

Obviously science has not progressed far enough to know how to model the human brain in a computer, or else we would probably be doing it already. So I guess I concede that we can't transfer the human brain yet, but I never said we could. But it is silly to believe we won't figure this out eventually. I would be surprised if it takes us 50 years.

I was only responding to the idea that if you transfer your brain to another medium, the old you dies. This is potentially true, but very unlikely. People can lose large portions of their brain without dying, and if those portions were replaced with synthetic computing devices I don't think anyone would think the old them has died.

That "replaced bit-by-bit" shit doesn't even fly at car auctions. There's no chance in hell close-minded idiots like me would accept a fully-replaced human as the original.

FTFY

Comment Re:Work with cloned mice (Score 2) 203 203

Which part of the brain holds your conscious self?
There is no scientific explanation for the phenomenon of consciousness - no theory about how it arises, not even a definition of what qualifies.

Consciousness is an emergent property of having a bunch of neurons together. Get enough neurons interacting and processing sensory data, and you get consciousness.

You cannot transfer consciousness without know what it is and how it works.

Bullshit. You only need to know how individual neurons work in order to produce artificial ones, and a process to replace existing ones with artificial ones. You certainly don't need to understand how the mind works in order to gradually transfer consciousness from a biological brain to an artificial one.

Comment Re:"Wer fremde Sprachen nicht kennt... (Score 2) 274 274

I completely agree. I'm fluent in four languages: Spanish, Catalan, English and Japanese, the first two native, plus I can understand (but not speak) Italian, Portuguese and French because they aren't that different from Spanish and Catalan.

I can see how at least in my case, learning how some constructs work in one language has helped me understand things about another.

It's also true that the language used to express yourself in a given situation affects the way you think about it, because of what you can and can't express, and the limits each language imposes on how you can communicate.

Often, when I talk to my bi/trilingual friends we find ourselves changing languages mid-sentence and speaking in a mix of them, not because we don't know how to say something in English or Japanese, but because sometimes it's either easier or more accurate to use one language over the other.

Comment LXDE, XFCE are "a little too light-weight" ? (Score 1) 403 403

my whole workflow is based on the quaintly named "classic desktop model" where screens and windows don't magically resize and change position (...) I'd switch to LXDE or XFCE, but they're a little too light-weight for my taste

What does "a little too light-weight" mean? Something like JWM or icewm?**

LXDE has a useful set of features and it won't waste your time with unwanted "special effects". If you really are frustrated by the barkers at the KDE-Gnome-Mate-Cinnamon desktop carnival, I suggest that you try Debian LXDE or even Lubuntu.

The configurable simplicity of LXDE is the main reason to use it. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_X_window_managers)

One of the main reasons why the Debian folks switched from Gnome to XFCE was that they couldn't fit Gnome on a CD anymore. The fact that the market is abandoning optical disks in favour of USB/SDHC booting doesn't mean that I want KDE/Gnome bloat.

**Disclaimer: I use icewm on my Raspberry Pi(s). The icewm DE light, simple, and easy to understand. Oh yeah, and the R.Pi won't run much else very well anyway. (o;

Comment Recommend that you keep reading /. (Score -1, Flamebait) 165 165

"Due to being in a relationship with a comics geek"

This must mean that you are a girl who enjoys basement lodging. Therefore, your post is false and was either submitted by a program that won the Turing Test or by a CIA operative.

It's 2014 and Slashdot is full of Golden-Age Comics.

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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