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Comment: Were the other Batman games this buggy on release? (Score 2) 221 221

This story wants to be a rallying cry for the sentiment to not pre-order games, but this was, what, the fourth game in the Batman: Arkham series, right? And it looks like it's on UE3 like the others, and it was done by the same studio that did two of the previous three games.

Pre-ordering can be dangerous, sure, but I think people were reasonable to perhaps assume that this game wouldn't have huge issues, and even if one or more of the previous games had issues surely whatever it was (cape physics?) could have been worked out by now.

I know things change between games and a $60 purchase is not cheap but telling people they're stupid for pre-ordering the fourth game in a series with most of the same elements in place is like telling people who are at the opening night of a movie that's a sequel to another movie they liked that they're being stupid for not waiting for reviews. Sure, the new movie might suck but is it unreasonable to think it probably won't?

Comment: Re:Yes, but it will be a while. (Score 1) 337 337

So much of the system libraries on both OS X and iOS are written in Objective-C and they aren't going anywhere.

Maybe at the application level, but not for system libraries.

So for a long time people at Apple will keep using the giant codebase they're familiar with but app developers, Apple and otherwise, will use Swift going forward. For the Universe minus Apple's OS developers, the statement is true.

Comment: Re:QNX was a stupid decision (Score 1) 113 113

Huh?

Around '96 Apple was internally working on a new OS that was a failure and bought NeXT started by this guy you may have heard of named Steve Jobs.

He's referring to the fact that Apple had, at one point, considered buying Be, Inc. and using BeOS as the foundation for what would become OS X. However, Jean-Louis Gassée wanted too much money, made some shitty comments in the press about sticking it to Apple, and Apple decided to buy NeXT instead.

Comment: Re:Good idea, bad implementation (Score 4, Informative) 239 239

Valve and Zenimax should have given at least the big-name modders some heads-up, so they could think and have time to rationally decide whether to start selling, and for how much, and to work out any licensing issues in multi-person teams.

I guess you missed it but they did exactly that.

Creator of removed paid Skyrim mod gives his side of the story

Basically Valve contacted him and several other high profile mod authors over a month and a half ago to participate in the rollout. In this particular case, the Art of the Catch mod (adds fishing to Skyrim, I think, I haven't tried it) needed some files from another mod to run, or it had a dependency, or both. Valve told him their legal team thought it would be OK but that the author should consult a lawyer on his own. He didn't, and many butts got hurt over the result.

But your assertion, that they did this with no notice to anyone, least of all the high profile modders, is wrong. They did exactly that.

Comment: Re:Comcast and Time Warner, a match made in . . . (Score 2) 112 112

Time Warner, a copyright focused company would have brought to the relationship.

It's worth pointing out that Time Warner Cable is, confusingly, not owned by Time Warner Inc. It used to be, of course, and for some reason it still has the name (likely some sort of obligation with an expiration date) but since 2009 it's been an independent company.

It's resulted in some asinine incidents, like how TWC for a while could not use HBO Go even though Time Warner proper owns HBO.

Comment: Re:Apple may outlive Acer - But will they make PCs (Score 1) 417 417

You make some good points but there's one thing I think is going on and is worth pointing out.

Apple is in an interesting spot at the moment in that, due to the sheer popularity of just about everything they make, they're selling more Macs now than ever before. People are switching to Macs more now than ever did during that "I'm a Mac" campaign. It's anecdotal evidence, sure, but my wife switched to OS X from Windows and didn't lose any momentum.

The issue Apple faces is that they've always had this small but devoted group of people to sell to. They could get away with software being done the way it was and at the quality level it was because they knew their core contingent would lap it up. And they did. But it likely left them with software that was difficult to maintain and lacking in features which would be difficult to add to the existing code.

Take Microsoft, for instance. By all accounts, the source code for the Office products is a fucking nightmare for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is the need to maintain compatibility with all of the documents already out there (and we know they don't always get that right either). The story goes that a several years ago they tried to rewrite everything from scratch while maintaining compatibility with existing documents. It was called Project Pyramid or Triangle or something. It was a disaster and after years of work and millions of dollars it was canceled. Fortunately they had continued to work on the regular Office suite so they still had something to ship (no Netscape level mistake made) but they simply had too much code in use by too many people to merit changing it. Look what happened when they tried to redo large portions of Windows - Vista was the result and it was a disaster that's kept a lot of the world on XP to this day.

Apple has their iWork suite and they realized with as many people getting Macs these days, and with Microsoft for a long time refusing to upgrade Office for Mac, if they were ever going to redo the code base now would be the time. Now, before millions more people use it and maybe make it part of their workflow. Same as Final Cut Pro. Thing is they don't know which features are really being used and which ones aren't so they come out with basic versions missing those features and when people complain that Thing X is missing, they put it back in.

It's true that the killing of Apeture is becaue they're not interested in the pseudo-pro photogtapher scene but I think that their other recent maneuvers with software are because if they want code that is long term maintainable, now would be the time to do it, before tons of other people use it and then they're stuck.

As for the DJ's and the cables, I would think anyone who wants to use a Mac professionally would know to get something other than the new MB. Its likely neither the most durable or portable Mac (11" MBA probably has it beat on portability) but its worth noting that if you have AppleCare (yes, an added expense) they'll replace broken cables for free just by bringing them to the store. Not an option if there's not an Apple store in the area but as a counter point to the "they make the cables crap so you have to buy new ones" argument, they'll replace your worn out cables for free under AppleCare.

Comment: Re:It's about time (Score 1) 86 86

decent price? 16 bucks for a re-re-release on a system where you can emulate the original or probably the re-release too.

Just because it's old doesn't mean it's worthless. They spent a lot of time and money making a 3D version of the game for the DS, which they released for $30 and sold a ton of. The iOS version has better graphics and a higher resolution and they charged $16, just over half of what the DS version cost. And you're still complaining.

baldurs gate enhanced edition ios is 9.99$.

Baldur's Gate is $9.99 on iOS because it's on sale. Its normal price is $19.99. Baldur's Gate II is normally $24.99. I know because I bought both at those prices. Also, they sort of suck on touch devices. And even if I'm wrong and they're both $9.99 because the price has permanently dropped it just proves my point that cheap people like yourself drove the price down to such a level that the only reason the games are profitable is because they're 17 years old and only the porting costs need to be covered. But you can fucking forget about new games of that depth coming out.

But thanks for proving my point about how mobile gaming drives prices down to the point where the only good RPG's are going to be ports of ancient games. Enjoy your F2P hell you've created.

Comment: Re:It's about time (Score 5, Insightful) 86 86

The days of selling "kiddie" handhelds with QVGA screens and $40 games are numbered.

God I hope not. Mobile gaming is nice and all but it's a race to the bottom. Every game has to be $0.99 or free, and IAP tied to gameplay (just 5 more moves for $0.99!). This is why there's nothing of any depth in mobile gaming. No one is going to sink millions into an RPG on an iPhone. Square has tried to charge decent prices for their games (like $15.99 for FF3) and no one buys them.

A lot of 3DS games are really good and it's because you can charge $40/pop for them and make a profit. Heck, the stupid AR games that come built into the 3DS are better games than 90% of the stuff on the iPhone.

I agree with your premise that dippy little games on Mobile with Mario will get the kids interested in Nintendo and hopefully pick up a Nintendo system but man I really hope that portable consoles and $40/game pricetags don't go away because otherwise everything is going to be a F2P mess.

People who think portable gaming on the 3DS is in any way analogous to modern Mobile games has no idea what they're talking about. Hopefully the market is large enough to carry both.

Comment: Re:Valve did it in 2007 (Score 1) 468 468

Another fool blathering on about "rights".

Says the coward.

Look, I don't give a fuck what you, some sleazy corporate lawyer, or some crooked, bought-off government thinks my "rights" should be, or what rights they think should be privileges.

So... no laws for you then, I guess?

I'll do what I see as right, and that's that.

And the rest of us should just hope you're some upstanding citizen, I suppose?

If some shitbag corp exec makes a decision that legally but unethically screws me, I'll look for a quick way to screw them right back.

Ah, vigilante I see. You're a regular digital Robin Hood.

This system is broken, and going through what's considered proper channels is extremely time-consuming, expensive, and rigged against you.

Are we still talking about region lockouts? Because it sounds like you're trying to take on City Hall or something.

This means you have to take things into your own hands if you want even a minute amount of justice.

Justice? Look just don't buy a CD key from a shady site and you'll be fine.

Seriously, you're acting like some white knight when really you're some jerkoff on Slashdot who wanted Far Cry 4 for $3 or something.

But let me guess, when that shady site then uses your credit card to buy CD keys in bulk from Origin for resale to other suckers you'll want that "system" to protect you and fix things, right?

You're pathetic.

Comment: Valve did it in 2007 (Score 2) 468 468

Valve did this same thing in 2007 with keys to The Orange Box bought from Thailand, which were considerably cheaper. They were very up front about it, they showed the Thai box packaging which clearly stated in English that this was not to be used outside of Thailand, etc.

There was a bit of blowback, and some hemming and hawing like we're seeing here, but ultimately it wasn't a big deal. Whether or not you agree with it, most people knew they were basically cheating by buying a cheap key from a shady foreign website, and they got busted for it (although they weren't out much money because, you know, cheap)

Honestly, when you're buying software you have to agree to the terms or else you don't buy it and you don't get to have it. Yes, if you think this is a dick move from Ubisoft then you're perfectly within your rights to avoid buying their products anymore. But don't think that they're the only ones who do this. Or have the right/ability to do this. And don't think this gives you some sort of right to pirate their games. Or that they had better give you what you want or else you'll pirate their games. You're wrong.

Comment: Re: Any actual examples? (Score 1) 598 598

There are numerous examples of people writing apps that do something you're not supposed to do in code but it happens to work, or that use something that's depreciated but hasn't been removed from the OS. When the OS upgrades and the code that was written incorrectly stops working, or when the new OS drops the depreciated functionality, the app breaks. It happens. It comes with the territory of having a computer in your pocket. Your old flip phone never had these issues but it was also never upgraded and couldn't do fuckall compared to a smart phone.

I personally had a perfectly fine iOS app I was working on that completely motherfucking broke, layout-wise, in iOS 8's SDK. In studying how to fix it I realized I had been doing a whole bunch of shit wrong and once I got those things fixed it worked great.

Apps breaking and the original author abandoning them is an issue but thems the breaks on a rapidly changing platform.

Comment: Re:Here's a question... (Score 1) 421 421

"My friend believes in evolution and I need to convince him that the world was created by God in a week. What arguments can I use to convince them to see the Light?"

Not the same exact thing but can you see why trying to back up your confirmation bias can be asinine?

Comment: Re:Swift (Score 1) 211 211

I imagine it will be approximately the same, or less, as the uptake for Obj-C when iPhones became a thing, which is "not terribly impressive".

Suddenly becoming one of the fastest growing programming languages in use and making several top ten lists isn't terribly impressive? Ok...

And now you're telling me that Swift -- which is essentially a tweaked Obj-C -- is "the biggest new language in a long time"? You can't even USE the language to program on anything other than OS X and iOS!

So, one of the most popular platforms on the planet (Apple is going to sell 71 million iPhones this quarter alone) isn't significant? Also when you say that it's a "tweaked Obj-C" that shows you have no idea what you're talking about.

I'm not seeing it, man. If a single popular smartphone and 10% desktop OS market share were enough for a language to piggyback off of to mainstream adoption, Objective C would be mainstream for cross-platform development. And it's not.

I like how you cite a number for OS X but not for iOS.

One last thing? Apple's only the "world's biggest company" because it overcharges for all its shit products, and stupid people don't see what a bad deal they're getting. In importance to the programming community, they're well below Google and Microsoft. Don't believe me? Take a look at C#'s popularity versus Obj-C.

Wow, where to begin. First you try and poison the well by saying that yes, Apple is the world's biggest company but only because they charge money. For their "shit products" no less. However, iOS is sitting at 44% market share which is #2 only to Android at 47%. But Android is only at 47% because it's on everything from high end Samsung devices to the crappy devices you can get at the checkout line at your local grocery store. Your disdain is for a company whose OS is only #2 to an OS that literally built its empire on "shit products".

But that's not the best part. The best part is that your example of a well done programming language is C#. I love C#. I've made my living in C# for close to a decade. It's a fantastic language. It is also, like Swift, a proprietary language designed by one company for their own proprietary OS. That's your yardstick. Yes, there is an always-behind implementation by the open source community but it's also a language that's over ten years old, as opposed to Swift which is literally six months old come Monday.

Again, this is a new, modern programming language introduced by the biggest company on earth for one of the biggest platforms on the planet and the uptake on it is unprecedented. C# didn't experience uptake this quickly because Microsoft had to explain what .NET was. Java didn't grow this fast because people thought it was used to make flashing thingies on websites. Swift has the advantage of a mature Internet age (the official guide is an eBook, not even a printed book, which Apple can patch as need be) and it's being unleashed onto a developer community starving for a better language.

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