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Comment: Computers computers computers... (Score 1) 182

by RoverDaddy (#48015623) Attached to: My toy collection is ...
I'm sitting right now in a room with about a dozen 'obvious' computers. Let's see: 3 PCs, one laptop, one Mac Mini, 2 Raspberry Pis, 3 Android tablets, one iPhone, one iPad. Yep that's 12. And of course there's also the wireless router and cable modem. And I'll go ahead and count my LCD TV since it's clearly a computer as well (especially when it locks up). Oh, and I shouldn't forget the Wii and PS2 even though I don't use those very often.

Clearly computers -are- my toys.

Comment: Re:Stacked RAM isn't anything new. (Score 1) 110

I have a memory card from an original IBM PC from 1982, which has stacked memory chips. In fact, each pair of chips has ALL of their pins wired to the same contacts on the PCB. Although I have been unwilling to take apart the board to verify, this leads me to believe that the chip on top and the chip underneath are different. I'm guessing one of them has an inverter on an address line, so it will respond to even addresses, while the other responds to odd addresses.

Comment: Re: I think I've seen this plan (Score 1) 330

by RoverDaddy (#46322531) Attached to: Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon
Really? The moon orbits the earth. Is it eclipsed by the earth 50% of the time? Of course not. You're only thinking about satellites in -low- earth orbit, which are shaded by the earth basically during half of each orbit. Put the satellites in very high orbits (geosynchronous itself is pretty high), and they are exposed to sunlight far more than 50% of the time. Heck, put a satellite in a polar orbit and for much of the year it can be exposed to the sun -throughout- its orbit.

Comment: Re: I think I've seen this plan (Score 1) 330

by RoverDaddy (#46320623) Attached to: Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon
That still means at any given time 1/2 the panels aren't doing anything useful. It also means on every lunar day the panels go through massive temperature transitions from incredibly hot to incredibly cold.

Instead, you could place a ring of panels in high orbit around the earth and have -all- of them working nearly all the time. I guess there might be a tradeoff due to the need for microwave transmitters on every generating satellite (since wiring together sets of panels many kilometers apart in earth orbit is probably not feasible).

...when fits of creativity run strong, more than one programmer or writer has been known to abandon the desktop for the more spacious floor. - Fred Brooks, Jr.

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