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Comment: Re:Make sense (Score 1) 530

by Rob Nance (#40386595) Attached to: Microsoft To PC and Tablet Makers: You're Not Our Future
I love that the first post is exactly what I would have posted, amen brother. This is what you do when times change RIM, you adapt. Microsoft realizes that unified architecture and a consistent experience is what consumers want, and what makes Apple devices so stable and easy to develop for. Very impressed with Microsoft's move here.

Comment: And the Catholic church continues it's lost ways (Score 1) 286

by Rob Nance (#39809791) Attached to: Opus Dei To Hunt Down Vatican Whistle-Blowers
The Catholic church has been lost for a long time, and this is just a sign it's never going to change. They changed the commandments to suit them for goodness sake! Changed the day of worship to suit them. Hid the bible from their followers because they didn't think their congregation could properly interpret the word of God (and also see the truth). Now in a long list of other atrocities, they banish someone for showing what's going on rather than commending them for helping identify a problem. Sorry if this comes across as an attack, but the Catholic church is scary. I think a lot of the people who are Catholic just don't know any better, and I feel for them.

Comment: Re:Best of Luck (Score 1) 500

by Rob Nance (#39787551) Attached to: Planetary Resources Confirms Plan To Mine Asteroids

Yeah, throwing money down a hole for the lulz. Just like space travel always was!

Seriously, are you so short-sighted that you cannot see how useful mining asteroids for water, air, and eventually precious minerals is? I'll give you a hint: absolutely, 100% vital to the continued development of the human race. This has nothing to do with doing something "for the lulz." It is all about advancing the state of the human race. Not for profit, but because humanity can and should expand. Asteroid mining is one step forwards in our expansion towards other planets, and if we intend to not go extinct, we need to do that. We may not need to now. We may not need to in a hundred years, but we will in a thousand, or a million, and we are only going to get there if we start at some point. Might as well do it now.

To quote from the article: "[Planetary Resources] want to make sure there are available resources in place to ensure a permanent future in space." Our future, eventually, is in space. Whether from global warming, resource exhaustion, or nuclear war, Earth will eventually not be enough. When that day comes, we will be glad some billionaires chose to spend their money on space expansion, instead of building/buying shiny new toys, or hookers and blow.

Not to mention that no matter how far off, we have a finite amount of resources, nobody can dispute that. Even if something won't run out for 100 years, how will we make advances and learn how to mine in space if we don't start now? It's the whole mindset of people that think we can just ignore something for a 100 years and then magically have the technology in 100 years. You can't from A to C without going through B. We wouldn't have any of the amazing things we have today if it was for people who accepted "It can't be done" or people that couldn't see past the short term and see the long term goal.

Comment: News flash, people in the office are lazy too (Score 1) 230

by Rob Nance (#39263907) Attached to: Building a Case For Telecommuting
It's probably easier to skate by in an office environment and go unnoticed than telecommuting. To say 10% of telecommuters aren't working means that chances are, 10% of your office workers aren't working. Lazy is lazy, people don't just magically become productive when you force them into an office. I'd venture to say because of improved morale, you're probably getting more work out of telecommuters than office zombies.

Comment: Great to see (Score 1) 230

by Rob Nance (#39263747) Attached to: Building a Case For Telecommuting
It's great to see so many people extolling the virtues of working from home. I got very ill back in December, and was kind of forced to be allowed to work from home and now it's kind of an open option for me. I usually do it one or two days a week, and I get a lot done those days. I also usually put in more hours, because it's easy to just pop on the TV around quitting time, and work less efficiently, but keep on working since I have my laptop out and I'm already logged into things. Saving the miles on my car, the gas, the commute time, etc is all awesome. Losing an hour or more of my day to commuting is such a waste for me and the company I work for.

Comment: Re:What about the stress of hazardous flight? (Score 1) 201

by Rob Nance (#37952170) Attached to: Simulated Mars Mission 'Returns' After 520 Days
I think the night landing thing is because of a lack of control over the situation. Fighter pilots are cocky, and they need to be, they can't be second guessing themselves. They need to be confident in their abilities, just like a race car driver, otherwise the self doubt will get you killed. So because of that, you raise good point. The astronauts would have little control over the risks in space flight, and thus would be under added stress from that alone, not to mention other things that have been mentioned like if you had a health problem, etc. I can relate to the lack of control thing from personal experience. I quit riding sportbikes not because of a doubt in my abilities, but because of unknown variables like other drivers, debris on roads, poor roads, etc. Once you start worrying about that stuff, you lose your edge and willingness to commit.
Games

+ - Video Games Improve Amblyopia Conditions in Older ->

Submitted by AndrewGOO9
AndrewGOO9 (1251062) writes "Announced at the American Academy of Ophthalmology 2011 Annual Meeting, a new study which was conducted in India may hold the key to correcting amblyopia, commonly called "lazy eye", in older kids. By adhearing to the prescribed course of treatment, which included playing electronic games coinciding with standard amblyopia treatments, significant results in treating the condition can be achieved. At the conclusion of the study, Dr. Somen Ghosh was able to report on the various procedures, which allowed roughly a third of the 10 to 18 year olds participating in the study to achieve vast gains towards correcting their vision. Over the course of a year, about 30 of the 100 participants had made great improvements towards their vision while 60 percent claimed some improvment. More gain was reported in participation groups 3 and 4 of the four treatment regimens. Group 3 participated in video game practice daily, while Group 4 was prescribed the supplement citicoline, which is associated with improved brain function. Ultimately, most of the improvements were noted to be more likely in kids under the age of 14 as opposed to those who were 14 years old and beyond."
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Stupid Hacker Tricks: Exploits Gone Bad->

Submitted by
snydeq
snydeq writes "Taunting tweets, provocative pics, iPad-spam chats — InfoWorld's JR Raphael sheds light on the stupid slip-ups that led to five recent high-profile hacker arrests. 'Clever as they often are, hackers can turn boneheaded pretty quickly and slip up in silly ways, leaving authorities a virtual road map pointing right to their doorsteps.'"
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