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Comment Re:Game controllers (Score 1) 281

It's probably more important to ask about vendor support for Linux, not Linux support for vendors. It's likely that a random gamepad or gizmo won't work, because the vendors aren't yet taking it very seriously. The solution here is not to buy a random gamepad or gizmo; do your research first. It may eventually happen, but we have to demand it.

Comment Re:Decent performance? (Score 1) 281

Part of the problem is a bias from the user; if Linux performance sucks for a game, it's Linux' fault; if the Windows performance sucks, it's the vendor's fault. In reality, it'll almost always be the vendor's issue, either because the video card manufacturer's drivers suck or because the game did not properly optimize.

In either case, it's a matter of time and will to make it happen. Hopefully it does. I counsel patience and pressuring the appropriate vendors when you have the opportunity.

Comment Re:Why? For the PR i guess? (Score 1) 281

Small percentages can hide large numbers. 1% of (say) a hundred million users is a market a million in size. Once you've saturated your sales on the Windows side of things and your sales start to slow to a crawl, maybe you're selling a trickle, you can get a healthy bump from selling to that smaller portion of the market a year down the line.

Comment Re:Those I play (Score 2) 281

I haven't had any problems with WoW for the best part of a decade in WINE, if you need a data point. I don't even remember whatever hacks I needed to get it working. Except that I run it in its own desktop session to simplify fullscreen mode. Similarly Diablo and Starcraft. I ran HotS a few times, seemed to work well enough. No idea about Hearthstone.

Comment Re:Tell the old dogs (Score 1) 394

The numbers change pretty fast once you leave the desktop market, obviously. Home routers, phones, tablets, servers. It's a varied ecosystem, capable of adapting and being adapted to new niches with minimal overhead. So I don't sweat the desktop market much, personally. It has succeeded for my desktop, and I'm happy with it there.

1.7% is still a lot of desktops in absolute terms.

Comment Re: Idiocy. (Score 1) 394

I've run into situations with people with your requirements. I'd give you administrative access, make a note of it in our wiki, and give you the brief schpiel about how if you break it, the most likely outcome is your machine getting re-imaged from bare metal, so keep backups. No sweat. Administrative access isn't a huge deal IFF the person can give the shibboleet, so to speak.

Comment Re: Idiocy. (Score 1) 394

What's your current ratio of staff to desktops? We have four people for about 600 machines, and we don't allow our staff admin access.

It's been my experience that the people with administrative access are more work, generally, since they get themselves into trouble more easily, even if they know what they're doing. Also, having staff waste time solving IT issues themselves is generally going to take more staff time, overall, than having a few dedicated people solving those issues on a broader scale; ie, one person taking 30 minutes to update and test Java is better than 1000 people spending 3 minutes each doing it, even if nothing goes wrong. In theory the IT person has a shot at being able to intercept potential issues with a critical app before it goes live.

Comment I work there and haven't heard about this (Score 1) 327

I do desktop support for one of the larger departments on the SFU campus, and this is the first I've heard of it. It is in no way universal to SFU; I'm pretty sure I would have heard about any large-scale test deployments of this nature.

I have pitched this idea a couple times, though. If someone else on campus has approved it, that's a huge boost to getting it done in my department.

"I'm not afraid of dying, I just don't want to be there when it happens." -- Woody Allen