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Comment: Re:Predictions of Bill Gates in 1995 (Score 3, Interesting) 577

by Radi-0-head (#36365002) Attached to: Could Apple Kill Off Mac OS X?
He did not make much mention of the Internet in the first revision of his book, however, in this Time Magazine article from 1995:

Gates is as fearful as he is feared, and these days he worries most about the Internet, Usenet and the World Wide Web, which threaten his software monopoly by shifting the nexus of control from stand-alone computers to the network that connects them. The Internet, by design, has no central operating system that Microsoft or anybody else can patent and license. And its libertarian culture is devoted to open—that is to say, nonproprietary—standards, none of which were set by Microsoft. Gates moved quickly this year to embrace the Net, although it sometimes seemed he was trying to wrap Microsoft's long arms around it.

Time Magazine - 12/22/1995

Comment: Predictions of Bill Gates in 1995 (Score 4, Insightful) 577

by Radi-0-head (#36363352) Attached to: Could Apple Kill Off Mac OS X?

In Bill Gates' book from 1995, "The Road Ahead", he discusses how computing switched from "mainframe"-type applications where the bulk of the storage and processing was done by a centralized system, and how that was falling out of favor for a more distributed desktop PC environment. He further predicted this model would eventually revert back to the "mainframe" (now known as "cloud").

Steve Jobs must have read this book.

Comment: Active jamming is illegal in the US (Score 3, Informative) 785

by Radi-0-head (#28900691) Attached to: School System Considers Jamming Students' Phones

First off - yes, this is very illegal which is why you don't see the use of active jamming equipment in the US. If they want to instead build a Faraday cage around the entire campus, this would be the "legal" - though prohibitively expensive - way of getting around the issue.

If in fact they attempt this, and staff or a student have a bona-fide medical emergency and are unable to summon emergency services, this district will then be tasked for paying for a home nurse to wipe the drool off of said victim's face for the rest of their lives.

You would think those who work in education would, you know, educate themselves on the relevant laws and ramifications of actions... nahhh, this is the US public school system we're talking about here.

Put your best foot forward. Or just call in and say you're sick.

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