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Comment Re:OS X (Score 4, Insightful) 405 405

Now if only OS X would was allowed to work on my 3 year old system which is more than powerful enough for it based on hacked installs, and if only all the software wasn't updated so it won't work on the last OS. Thanks Apple!

Meanwhile I can install Windows 10 on a 10 year old system and play a 16 year old game just fine. Boo Microsoft for being horrible people that don't give away your amazing product for free and don't have a penguin or a fruit as a logo.

What three-year-old Mac doesn't support the latest version of OS X? OS X 10.10 "Yosemite" officially supports Macs dating as far back as 2007 (or 2008 or 2009, depending on the system), and I believe El Capitan will support the same.

Comment Re:There are always options. (Score 1) 627 627

Make the entire folder read-only. Done.

And exactly what folder would that be in Windows? I'm guessing they download to some sort of temporary folder, then install to places largely in %windir%, particularly %windir%/system32 (and the WoW64 equivalent). But good luck with that--and even if that's right and doesn't break regular usage, updates are going to install elevated anyway and can do whatever they want, including turning off a read only flag.

But this begs the question: what kind of anal retentive asshole would not want to receive Windows security updates? Why is this even an issue? If I upgrade to Windows 10, I want every security update the second it comes out. Sooner, if possible.

Security updates, sure. But Microsoft has traditionally divided Windows Updates into two categories: required and optional. The former is primarily security updates, while the second may include minor bug fixes (traditionally ones that were targeted for presumably better testing inside a later service pack but made available sooner for those affected) or updates to optional components, like new versions (non-security updates) of the .NET Framework, new drivers, and whatnot. I'll take the first but would rather have the opportunity to test the second myself and roll back if needed.

Comment But is v2 useful for Chat? (Score 2) 63 63

Facebook's API description says about v2: "In v2.0, the friends API endpoint returns the list of a person's friends who are also using your app. In v1.0, the response included all of a person's friends." This doesn't sound like it will be a useful replacement for their XMPP chat interface unless everybody is using the same third-party app, or maybe I'm missing something.

Comment Re:Not really true (anymore) (Score 1) 199 199

Unless Title Guy edited the title in the past ten minutes, I don't see how "Mozilla Temporarily Disables Flash" is "misleading phrasing that will make people think they blocked any past, current, or hypothetical future version".

Slashdot edited the headline--thanks for giving me the benefit of the doubt. :) The old one was something like "Mozilla disables all versions of Flash in Firefox."

Wait, or maybe they didn't edit the headline, IDK (though I think they did)--but the story still implies the same (perhaps that's what I remember), that they're disabling "all versions," which is no longer true in any case.

Comment Re:Not really true (anymore) (Score 1) 199 199

Unless Title Guy edited the title in the past ten minutes, I don't see how "Mozilla Temporarily Disables Flash" is "misleading phrasing that will make people think they blocked any past, current, or hypothetical future version".

Slashdot edited the headline--thanks for giving me the benefit of the doubt. :) The old one was something like "Mozilla disables all versions of Flash in Firefox."

Comment Not really true (anymore) (Score 5, Informative) 199 199

Mozilla did block the then-latest version of Flash Player, 18.0.0.203, last night. Adobe released version 18.0.0.209 early today, which fixes this vulnerability and which Mozilla is not blocking. They didn't really block "all versions," they just blocked versions less than or equal to known vulnerable versions, which at that time happened to also include the then-latest version. Let's stop using misleading phrasing that will make people think they blocked any past, current, or hypothetical future version of the plugin.

Comment Only "rented" books--headline/summary misleading (Score 4, Informative) 172 172

As is usual, the headline and summary are sensationalized at the expense of truth: Amazon isn't doing this for all Kindle books. They're doing it only for self-published Kindle books (i.e., not ones from actual publishing houses, which comprise the majority of books most people actually read), and even then it's not for books that are actually purchased: it's for books read as part of the Kindle Owners' Lending Library and Kindle Unlimited programs, which basically allow you to rent/check out participating books for "free" if you are in one of those programs (the former requires an Kindle reader or tablet from Amazon plus a Prime subscription, and the latter requires a monthly fee). Books people actually buy are unaffected, as are the vast majority of books in general even if they're rented. This is still an interesting model, but it's not as extreme as I thought from the Slashdot posting. I guess it would kind of be like Pandora negotiating a significantly lower royalty on songs that are skipped within the first few seconds.

Comment Re:There is a bypass. (Score 1) 57 57

Just go to http://google.com/ncr to bypass it.

How, exactly, does a "no country redirect" (i.e., "ncr") help in this situation? That's just intended for you to be taken to the "regular" (US English) Google.com homepage in case it's incorrectly detecting your location or you otherwise don't want to be redirected to a country-specific site. I'm pretty sure there's nothing else special about it.

Comment Re:"clinging to dialup" (Score 1) 153 153

It's not just grandmas. I work for a high-end web dev company in Seattle, and almost a third of my coworkers still have @aol.com addresses. I do too because dial-up is the only option where I live. Plus, it's nice to have had the same email address for nearly twenty years.

You (and they) know you can keep your aol.com e-mail address if you cancel your paid dial-up service, right? I understand you apparently have other reasons to keep it, but...

Comment Re:who cares? Me. (Score 2) 154 154

Responsible software should have a released branch that has only bug fixes, and then other versions for new features. Otherwise, how the fark can one use your software for certified products? How can someone do a risk analysis on something as a platform, when it might change daily? Feature changes should not be casually thrown in. Yes, mozilla stupidly did this - but most software does not, and should not. [...].

Maybe "did," but they don't anymore and haven't since 2012, which is shortly after they switched to the stupid Chrome-esque release model. They have an "ESR" (extended support release) branch intended for the enterprise but usable by anyone who only wants important fixes without big changes for a relatively long period of time--though in the world of Web browsers right now, I guess that only means a year.

Comment Re:"old sata drives"? (Score 1) 162 162

I'm not sure why this is news. Sticking any device on the PCIe bus is going to allow for a lot more speed than using the SATA bus...

Did you read the summary? It's reporting that new PCIe SSDs are not faster than "old" SATA SSDs as measured by real-world app- and game-loading times (not benchmarks, in which of course PCIe outperforms, as they do mention). By "not faster," I mean "equal," which is what the headline means (somewhat odd usage of the phrase "as fast as" when you already expect the first thing to be faster, so maybe that's where the confusion comes from).

Thus spake the master programmer: "Time for you to leave." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"

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