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Comment Re:Holy Cow (Score 1) 248

[...] Can't anybody build anything that will last more than a few weeks? Am I that old to believe long tern stability is a good thing?

Good thing Mozilla does just that, eh? They pick one of about every seven major-version Firefox release to make an ESR (extended support release) version, and they have been doing this since 2012. The ESR release is supported for one full year, plus another couple months or so (specifically, the time it takes to release the next major version of Firefox after that on which the last point release of the ESR version is based--they add critical fixes from major versions to ESR versions during the year of support but avoid major feature or UI changes).

This is intended for organizations that deploy Firefox and need some stability (e.g., to test something before deployment and ensure support longer than 6-8 weeks), but you can use it at home, too, if you want.

Comment Re:What is the best choice for Open Source lights? (Score 1) 358

Nobody's done this? Heh...

GE has. It's called Wink and it's got the most stunning range of interoperability on the market. ZB HA, ZB LL, Z-Wave, Lutron's protocol.
Insteon's working on theirs.

Everything I've seen says that Wink still requires the Philips Hue hub (just like SmartThings still requires it)--see, for example, http://www.wink.com/help/products/philips-hue-lighting-starter-kit/. It certainly should be possible, however, and since GE's own Link bulbs clearly support ZB LL, this was surprising to me.

Comment Re:What is the best choice for Open Source lights? (Score 4, Informative) 358

Philips Hue. I'm not kidding. The ZigBee Light Link protocol that it uses is an open standard. The API that the Bridge uses to communicate via HTTP is also open, published by Philips. A few third parties have even made LightLink-compatible bulbs. They did not reverse-engineer anything. This summary is a little misleading in several ways: first, any third-party devices already joined will stay that way (unless you reset your bridge to defaults with the new firmware on it); second, there actually are problems with some bulbs that were exposed with the new firmware; and third, it's not that they aren't allowing third-party devices but rather that they just want them to be "Friends of Hue" certified first--though in fairness, even though that program has been around for a couple years I don't think anyone besides Philips has created products for it.

Someone could create an open-source ZigBee LightLink "bridge" compatible with Hue that lets you join whatever bulbs you want. It's just that nobody's done this, possibly because Philips' own product has historically been so good. I suspect some third party may create a compatible "bridge" soon, maybe SmartThings since their hub already has a ZigBee-capable radio, if they ever decide its' a good idea, but who knows. You'd probably also lose the Web-based functionality the Philips bridge enables, like scene syncing across devices, control when you're away from your home network (without needing to VPN in), and the ability to also use the website to control your lights.

Comment Re:OS X (Score 4, Insightful) 405

Now if only OS X would was allowed to work on my 3 year old system which is more than powerful enough for it based on hacked installs, and if only all the software wasn't updated so it won't work on the last OS. Thanks Apple!

Meanwhile I can install Windows 10 on a 10 year old system and play a 16 year old game just fine. Boo Microsoft for being horrible people that don't give away your amazing product for free and don't have a penguin or a fruit as a logo.

What three-year-old Mac doesn't support the latest version of OS X? OS X 10.10 "Yosemite" officially supports Macs dating as far back as 2007 (or 2008 or 2009, depending on the system), and I believe El Capitan will support the same.

Comment Re:There are always options. (Score 1) 628

Make the entire folder read-only. Done.

And exactly what folder would that be in Windows? I'm guessing they download to some sort of temporary folder, then install to places largely in %windir%, particularly %windir%/system32 (and the WoW64 equivalent). But good luck with that--and even if that's right and doesn't break regular usage, updates are going to install elevated anyway and can do whatever they want, including turning off a read only flag.

But this begs the question: what kind of anal retentive asshole would not want to receive Windows security updates? Why is this even an issue? If I upgrade to Windows 10, I want every security update the second it comes out. Sooner, if possible.

Security updates, sure. But Microsoft has traditionally divided Windows Updates into two categories: required and optional. The former is primarily security updates, while the second may include minor bug fixes (traditionally ones that were targeted for presumably better testing inside a later service pack but made available sooner for those affected) or updates to optional components, like new versions (non-security updates) of the .NET Framework, new drivers, and whatnot. I'll take the first but would rather have the opportunity to test the second myself and roll back if needed.

Comment But is v2 useful for Chat? (Score 2) 63

Facebook's API description says about v2: "In v2.0, the friends API endpoint returns the list of a person's friends who are also using your app. In v1.0, the response included all of a person's friends." This doesn't sound like it will be a useful replacement for their XMPP chat interface unless everybody is using the same third-party app, or maybe I'm missing something.

Comment Re:Not really true (anymore) (Score 1) 199

Unless Title Guy edited the title in the past ten minutes, I don't see how "Mozilla Temporarily Disables Flash" is "misleading phrasing that will make people think they blocked any past, current, or hypothetical future version".

Slashdot edited the headline--thanks for giving me the benefit of the doubt. :) The old one was something like "Mozilla disables all versions of Flash in Firefox."

Wait, or maybe they didn't edit the headline, IDK (though I think they did)--but the story still implies the same (perhaps that's what I remember), that they're disabling "all versions," which is no longer true in any case.

Comment Re:Not really true (anymore) (Score 1) 199

Unless Title Guy edited the title in the past ten minutes, I don't see how "Mozilla Temporarily Disables Flash" is "misleading phrasing that will make people think they blocked any past, current, or hypothetical future version".

Slashdot edited the headline--thanks for giving me the benefit of the doubt. :) The old one was something like "Mozilla disables all versions of Flash in Firefox."

Comment Not really true (anymore) (Score 5, Informative) 199

Mozilla did block the then-latest version of Flash Player, 18.0.0.203, last night. Adobe released version 18.0.0.209 early today, which fixes this vulnerability and which Mozilla is not blocking. They didn't really block "all versions," they just blocked versions less than or equal to known vulnerable versions, which at that time happened to also include the then-latest version. Let's stop using misleading phrasing that will make people think they blocked any past, current, or hypothetical future version of the plugin.

Comment Only "rented" books--headline/summary misleading (Score 4, Informative) 172

As is usual, the headline and summary are sensationalized at the expense of truth: Amazon isn't doing this for all Kindle books. They're doing it only for self-published Kindle books (i.e., not ones from actual publishing houses, which comprise the majority of books most people actually read), and even then it's not for books that are actually purchased: it's for books read as part of the Kindle Owners' Lending Library and Kindle Unlimited programs, which basically allow you to rent/check out participating books for "free" if you are in one of those programs (the former requires an Kindle reader or tablet from Amazon plus a Prime subscription, and the latter requires a monthly fee). Books people actually buy are unaffected, as are the vast majority of books in general even if they're rented. This is still an interesting model, but it's not as extreme as I thought from the Slashdot posting. I guess it would kind of be like Pandora negotiating a significantly lower royalty on songs that are skipped within the first few seconds.

Comment Re:There is a bypass. (Score 1) 57

Just go to http://google.com/ncr to bypass it.

How, exactly, does a "no country redirect" (i.e., "ncr") help in this situation? That's just intended for you to be taken to the "regular" (US English) Google.com homepage in case it's incorrectly detecting your location or you otherwise don't want to be redirected to a country-specific site. I'm pretty sure there's nothing else special about it.

Comment Re:"clinging to dialup" (Score 1) 153

It's not just grandmas. I work for a high-end web dev company in Seattle, and almost a third of my coworkers still have @aol.com addresses. I do too because dial-up is the only option where I live. Plus, it's nice to have had the same email address for nearly twenty years.

You (and they) know you can keep your aol.com e-mail address if you cancel your paid dial-up service, right? I understand you apparently have other reasons to keep it, but...

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