Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Proud to be gay??? (Score 3, Insightful) 764 764

Right, so the next time someone makes a joke starting with, "Hey, did you hear the one about the guy with 10-fingers?" Or the next time some demi-celebrity tweets, "@SoAndSo, That's so 10-toed." Or political figures build entire platforms on saying people with 10-fingers can't be legally married to other people with 10-fingers or adopt kids. Or a employer say, "Yeah, Mr. 10-fingers, we don't like people working here who have 10-fingers, so we're firing you." Or a landlord says, "I saw you bring that 10-fingered person into your apartment last night, so I'm evicting you." Or religious figures say things like, "Ebola is God's punishment for us allowing people with balls big as church bells to be accepted by society." When any of these things happen, you'll have a point. Until then, there's a reason homosexuals feel a need to draw attention to something that really shouldn't matter, but which very much does in this society.

So it's great that you don't care what his orientation is and you would treat him exactly like you would treat anyone else. Congratulations on being part of the solution. But then you're not the target audience so why do you even care enough to post about how much you don't care?

Comment Re:my thoughts (Score 1) 372 372

If Ebola infection post exposure were substantially higher than the suggested 30% rate, wouldn't we expect more infections than we're seeing? At the very least, someone who was exposed to Duncan prior to his medical isolation should have contracted it as it's hard to credit that he was in complete isolation from the moment he was symptomatic, through his original hospital visit, back to where he was staying, and then back to the hospital for diagnosis and admission. Again, at the very least, at some point the people he was staying with, who would have had the most intimate and longest contact with him, would have come into contact with his bodily fluids to some extent and at least one of them should have become infected. Further, 2 health providers of around 70 who where working with him have been diagnosed. These health workers most likely had a higher rate of contact with his bodily fluids while he was sloughing virus in high number. It seems the hospital provided questionable training on how to use protective gear correctly, so it would be reasonable to think other exposures due to inaccurate protection procedures would have occurred, even though we've so far only seen a 3% infection rate among the health care workers who were giving him care.

Comment Re:Im all for human rights... (Score 1) 1482 1482

That's a pretty broad definition of "forcing", to simply provide the opportunity. The response, though, is simple: If you don't feel that it is right to marry someone of the same sex, don't marry someone of the same sex. How are rights being compromised under the more lenient situation?

Comment Re:NIMBY NIMBY NIMBY!!! (Score 1) 317 317

How do you respond to the Duke University studies that found methane levels in drinking water at around 55 mg/L in parts of Texas near fracking sites and found levels of methane in Pennsylvania drinking water were elevated by up to 6 times at homes within 1 km of a fracking site?

Comment Re:No, it's both (Score 2) 275 275

I think Oregon tried to be much more ambitious than other state exchanges, which is what brought its complexity level more in-line with what HealthCare.gov. Oregon saw its portal as being a one-stop shop for anyone in any aspect of health insurance, meaning individuals, businesses both large and small, providers, insurers, anyone. Other states presumably had a much more narrowly defined approach to their state-run exchanges, so while they may not be comparable to HealthCare.gov (and working better in most cases), CoverOregon.com really is.

However, even if Oregon delivered a crap spec that was way too ambitious, if Oracle wasn't raising red flags earlier or, even worse, was still saying they could deliver when they had an incomplete or poorly-characterized spec of what to deliver, then wouldn't that clearly be on Oracle. It sounds like there was just a major communications breakdown between the state of Oregon and Oracle and Oracle didn't do its due diligence to reestablish communication in a timely manner.

Comment Re:Red state (Score 1) 470 470

So what? A budget resolution isn't an appropriations bill. If it fails to pass, the government doesn't go dark or stop working. Plenty of examples since 1974's Congressional Budget Act of joint budgets not being reconciled. Sometimes it's the Dems, sometimes it's the Republicans. In 1999, 2005 and 2007, when Republicans held majorities in both chambers of Congress, they still couldn't pass a joint budget resolution.

Comment Re:job based health care hurts haveing older peopl (Score 1) 617 617

Technically true, but it's a incomplete argument being used to prop up an incorrect implication as it doesn't take into account one of the largest consumers of healthcare: Dependents. While an older worker, meaning any worker over 50, may begin to use more healthcare themselves, they have far fewer dependents using that healthcare actively, specifically pregnancies, infants and young children. A worker who has their last child at 35 may begin using more health care at 50, but their 15 year old child would begin using far less. According to Peter Capelli of the Wharton Center for Human Resources, this shift in who is actually using the healthcare balances out any increased usage by older workers and, in fact, may sometimes actually save the company money. Couple this wash of healthcare cost usage with the fact that older workers generally outperform younger workers and any company using this incorrect notion to trim their books of older worker salaries for younger worker/H-1Bs short term profit games is setting themselves up for IP failure in a few short years.

Comment Re:job based health care hurts haveing older peopl (Score 2) 617 617

job based health care hurts having older people work for companies.

Technically true, but it's a incomplete argument being used to prop up an incorrect implication as it doesn't take into account one of the largest consumers of healthcare: Dependents.

While an older worker, meaning any worker over 50, may begin to use more healthcare themselves, they have far fewer dependents using that healthcare actively, specifically pregnancies, infants and young children. A worker who has their last child at 35 may begin using more health care at 50, but their 15 year old child would begin using far less. According to Peter Capelli of the Wharton Center for Human Resources, this shift in who is actually using the healthcare balances out any increased usage by older workers and, in fact, may sometimes actually save the company money.

Couple this wash of healthcare cost usage with the fact that older workers generally outperform younger workers and any company using this incorrect notion to trim their books of older worker salaries for younger worker/H-1Bs short term profit games is setting themselves up for IP failure in a few short years.

Comment Re:No Law Against Manufacture: PERIOD (Score 1) 632 632

Being able to fight a "tyrannical government" != everyone being able to print a gun on demand. Given your argument that there must be parity of weapon scale, do you support everyone being able to have a dirty bomb in their backyard as well? By your logic, to successfully mount a defense of the free state, we all must have the right to own everything from hand guns to tanks to jet fighters to nukes.

This is a pretty dangerous stance. If I have all these implements of destruction at my hand and feel that a "tyrannical" government is persecuting me, and there's no explicit litmus test other than I "feel threatened", should I not use them to strike at that government? How is this, then, any different from an act of domestic terrorism?

As interesting as this rabbit hole is, it is hardly the issue at hand. The issue is if I, in a capitalist society, have a right to determine the usage limitations of my own rental property pursuant with any legally recognized contract or lease agreement. Even if it was enshrined in the Second Amendment that people have the right to print guns or whatever, in a free society I have a right to say, "Not on my machinery, you don't," just as you, in a free society, have a right to say, "Fine, then, I'll find someone who will let me," and take your trade elsewhere. So to frame this as some sort of Second Amendment case is a stretch at best and, at worse, a direct attack on the freedoms the Second Amendment is supposed to help guard, namely a government run amok with regulation.

Comment Re:No Law Against Manufacture: PERIOD (Score 1) 632 632

You're reading a lot into that interpretation of the Second Amendment. It is questionable that the framers of the Bill of Rights had any notion of 3D-printing or the potential ability of any citizen at any time to be able to rent time on a 3D printer and create any type of firearm with relative ease (not yet, of course, but give it time)1. Thus it is a pretty big stretch to say that this is clearly infringement on a Federal level, where the primary concern is banning of militias.

Ideally, as it's not explicitly stated in the Constitution one way or the other, the power to regulate this probably should fall to the States.

Comment Re:Overreaction. (Score 2) 632 632

Actually, that's not strictly true. Depending upon the lease agreement you signed and whatever clauses the rental agency or owner put in there, you could potentially be kicked out for being gay or having gay sex and only a handful of states include sexual orientation in their fair housing statutes.

http://civilrights.findlaw.com/discrimination/fair-housing-laws-renters-protection-from-sexual-orientation.html

The point is, though, just like in your comparison, a lot of how legal this is depends on what was originally signed. Without having access to that signed agreement, everything else is speculation at best.

Comment Re:Well... (Score 1) 218 218

Recognized by who, though? While the lawsuit claims that this is a series, as many have pointed out it is not being labeled as such by Marr, Harper Collins or really anywhere else. Even if it is the first book in a series, it is individually named "Carnival of Souls" and there is now real evidence to be found that the series itself is being branded with that name. Regardless, his beef is with Harper Collins, not the various book blogs that reviewed the book.

A wiser approach would have been to go after HC first, get a judgment in his favor and then contact the book blogs and inform them of the judicial decision, asking them to either change or remove their reviews to be in compliance. Then, if they refused, send out the official C&Ds in preparation for legal action against those specific blogs that refused. Going the route he did, shotgunning out C&Ds, makes him look like he's just trolling for attention for his series (even if he's really not), rather than appropriately defending his trademark.

1 + 1 = 3, for large values of 1.

Working...