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Comment: Re:Amazon has really been a stealth company (Score 1) 79

by Princeofcups (#49546825) Attached to: Amazon's Profits Are Floating On a Cloud (Computing)

They started as a bookseller, then moved slowly into other merchandise

They started as a method to sell and distribute goods on the internet. Books were only their choice for a physical manifestation of the method. I guess you are too young to remember what people were speculating on back in the "boom."

Comment: Re:We need a law against overzealous prosecutors (Score -1) 206

Period

Hacking is relatively benign compared to the damage a prosecutor with an agenda can do. The latest round of these travesties is now going on in Wisconsin http://www.wsj.com/articles/ri... , It seems we get these popping up about once a year lately and it's been accelerating.

Nice way to use a real issue to push you political agenda. Wall Street Journal, the new Fox News for the criminally insane.

Comment: Re: Waiting for the killer app ... (Score 1) 389

by Princeofcups (#49517313) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

IPv6 would help both enormously. Lower latency on routing means faster responses.

Responses? Most of the internet traffic is streaming video, which gains speed by being cached, not having a direct connection to the server. Fess up. Most people here screaming that they need IPv6 are only interested in game ping times. Or else they really don't understand the difference between latency and "ping time."

Comment: Re:IPv6 and Rust: overhyped and unwanted! (Score 0) 389

by Princeofcups (#49517309) Attached to: Why the Journey To IPv6 Is Still the Road Less Traveled

And 99.9% of people don't care.

There are a lot of things 99.9% of people don't care about. If that's your justification...

Me personally, I'd love my end-to-end connectivity back.

People who think they need end-to-end connectivity for everything don't understand networking. It's not only not required, it is undesirable in most cases.

Comment: Re:Complexity is a feature, not a bug (Score 2) 626

Part of the problem is, these two things are working at cross purposes. Contrary to your instinct, making a language easy to learn will also probably harm the cause of fostering interest.

The problem is, from a sort of detached, scientific, logical point of view, it sounds like a great idea to have a language that is simple, easy to learn, containing definite rules, with no irregularity, and leaving little room for ambiguity. The problem is, people don't want language to work that way. It's not specifically that they want it to be hard to learn, but they want a language with nuance and ambiguity. We like puns and plays on words. People often enjoy and appreciate slang, or unusual word choice.

I am an American English speaker who has taken the first step to learning Japanese. One of the first things that confuses westerners about Japanese is the four alphabets, two phonetic (hiragana and katakana), one symbols borrowed from Chinese (kanji), as well as the English alphabet. Why not standardize the whole thing on English, and get rid of the rest? Well, then I discovered Kanji puns. There are different pronunciations and meanings for each Kanji, and they can be used in various ways to create double and triple meanings. The Japanese love to use Kanji puns. So, yeah, no one is looking for the optimally simple language. People want a language that the average people can communicate in, and the clever people can be funny and interesting in.

Comment: Re:Remove access ASAP (Score 3, Insightful) 279

Removing access immediately is important for 2 reasons. The first is obviously security. Then 2nd is figuring out what he does & making sure somebody else has that access & knowledge.

Beat me to it. When I saw "finishing up projects," that immediately raised a red flag. All projects should immediately be turned over to other staff, and the short termer can watch over their shoulders and answer any questions. It may make sense to let them keep email and IM during the time, and maybe even read-only to code to help look up issues. But that's about it.

For me it's not about security of the company. It's security of the person leaving, so that they can't get blamed for breaking something during that time. But the most important thing is knowledge transfer. Two weeks is a very short time to document all the little things that were picked up during their tenure.

My biggest complaint recently has been people leaving without proper knowledge transfer. Even after I emailed managers on that point, and was told to try to stop scheduling meetings with him. "He's too busy." Sigh. Now I'm left picking up the mess he left behind.

Comment: Re:Shitty Deal? (Score 2) 198

Yeah, MS spent a copious amount of dollars developing a clean, efficient, and practical framework. They're being generous by not only continuing to develop it with all sorts of modules and internal testing, but expand it to other platforms.

Generous? I don't think you are using that word correctly. If anything, MS is using this as a means of increasing market share. If that happens, they will come out with the next proprietary version to trap people into. Don't go thinking that MS ever does anything for the "common good."

Comment: Re:software dev vs programmer (Score 1) 139

by Princeofcups (#49376521) Attached to: IT Jobs With the Best (and Worst) ROI

Yeah it makes no sense. They have separate categories for Software Engineer, Programmer, and Software Developer. They are the same job, although often they have slightly different connotations in that in some organizations the word engineer has more prestige than programmer but it varies.

Pretty much useless... a distinction that makes no different at best. Even if some pedant comes along and says "a software engineer has XX degree and a programmer has YY degree" it is still meaningless because these types of distinctions are not generally agreed upon.

But that's why all three are listed. Companies that post may have different names for pretty much the same job, but the posters have to find a matching title. I don't see what the problem is.

Comment: Re:Totally agree with Bechdel (Score 0) 522

by Princeofcups (#49330743) Attached to: A Bechdel Test For Programmers?

It was a joke. Which is all this idiotic topic deserves. The Bechdel test makes some (although not much) sense for a movie, where the characters and dialog are the whole point. But for a software project? Why should I care about the gender of who wrote the software I am using?

That is the crux of the problem, that you do not care. To you this is unimportant, and should not matter. You are incapable of believing that it COULD matter. You dismiss it, instead of trying to understand how it could be important. And while the majority of the "geek community" is so positive that their worldview is so perfect and right and just that it is silly to think otherwise, nothing will change.

Start with the concept that it IS important. Try to imagine that. Then you may be able to get out of your tiny little shell of superiority, and lean about the rest of the world.

Comment: Narcissism and Sociopathy (Score 1) 140

by Princeofcups (#49286637) Attached to: Gates: Large Epidemics Need a More Agile Response

Narcissism and sociopathy are probably the most harmful diseases currently known to man, leading directly to wholesale slaughter, destruction of the environment, rampant poverty, etc. The sooner that we can put people like the referenced into a controlled medicated environment where they can no longer have such a negative affect on the world the better.

Comment: Re:Shouldn't that be sign? (Score 4, Informative) 93

Is the vulnerability described in the article applicable only to older versions of MacOS/X, or has the researcher found a way around that test?

Quoting the article: "It’s not a point-and-click exploit – the attacker will need to get on the same network as the target Mac, either through a breach or by sharing the same public Wi-Fi access point, and then inject a vulnerable but legitimate application and make some purely cosmetic changes to the appearance of the .dmg (virtual installer disk) file when mounted."

Sounds pretty theoretical at this point. I don't see the "reliable technique of Shared Library replacement" that the summary declares.

Comment: Fake Login Time (Score 1) 340

It's time to start hacking our phone to have two accounts, one that you use, and one that is pretty much blank. When they ask you to unlock, it shows them the blank one. No information there, sorry. Same thing with laptops. Make sure that you're logged into the guest account when you pass security.

If a 6600 used paper tape instead of core memory, it would use up tape at about 30 miles/second. -- Grishman, Assembly Language Programming

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