Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:working GPS and maps.... (Score 1) 322

by PhuFighter (#42892349) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Features Belong In a 'Smartwatch'?
I definitely agree with this - except for the fact that the typical hipster won't be in the woods. Although they'd likely get lost if in one. Having a magnetometer, compass, and tie-in to Apple Maps so that there's augmented reality would be a great feature. Imagine setting what you want to go to on your iphone, put it in your pocket, and can navigate to your destination. Along the way, have some notifications (e.g. email/fb/etc), etc. as needed. Perhaps a Google Now like features? come to think of it, having google now on a watch would be brilliant.

Comment: bye bye google (Score 1) 456

by PhuFighter (#40029373) Attached to: Online Loneliness At Google+
I'm still rather peeved at all of the changes to gmail. Since they announced that they wanted to force changes to the gmail UI, I stopped using g+, started to use duckduckgo, and blocked as many google scripts and sites as I possibly could. Once I find a gmail alternative, they can basically kiss me and my family good bye.

Comment: Re:33,500 rows? (Score 1) 168

by PhuFighter (#39065051) Attached to: Oracle Claims Dramatic MySQL Performance Improvements
25 columns, at 4 bytes per column, that's 100 bytes. I'm not sure how much overhead, but hopefully not much. 100 bytes at 2000 rows = 200,000 bytes. Across 32KB pages, that's 7 pages, allowing for 10% overhead. I assume that it's 40 Gb/sec IB, how many microseconds would that take to transfer? As for the join, i guess if there is more details about the schema (i think there's a link to it buried somewhere), simple joins should be pretty quick. I agree that a poorly implemented optimizer producing a bad plan could result in a nested-loop join wasting a lot of cycles, what this article tells me is that this database is pretty much on par with a quality RDBMS from years ago, and nowhere near as fast as NoSQL databases of today.

Comment: Re:Market fragmentation (Score 1) 341

by PhuFighter (#37433332) Attached to: The (Big) Problem With RIM

Yeah. This whole mindset with RIM is frustrating. I fail to understand why so many things are so secretive. E.g. the builds of their OS - Windows, iOS, etc. have betas available, but RIM keeps on keeping it a secret and having each carrier release it individually. And getting information on how to develop for the system is amazingly difficult. All of their hardware efforts are moot if they don't open up as a company, be able to take some criticism, and work with the development community to help them develop software.

Oh, providing a decent API helps too. Their secrecy has got to stop.

P.S. I don't think going Android is the way to go. If I want Android, I'd get HTC or Samsung. But I have my BB still because of the keyboard and the security still. Of course, I put the SIM card into the 'ol iphone occasionally.

Comment: Re:I hate the new bulbs. (Score 1) 557

by PhuFighter (#33713304) Attached to: Selling Incandescent Light Bulbs As Heating Devices

The article is false and misleading. If I clean up a leaking 55gallon drum of mercury wearing a proper hazmat suit I can be exposed to less mercury then a can of tuna, but does that make it safe to dispose of in a landfill? Just because personal exposure to a spill is low doesn't mean they are landfill safe!

I don't quite follow the argument here. How did you go from a CFL light bulb to a drum of mercury? Unless, of course, you're comparing quantities. a few glasses of water per day would be good. One glass a day would be far too little. But if you drank, say, 10 gallons in a sitting, that is obviously going to be toxic. As is drinking a few glasses of DDH2O ("pure" water).

Comment: Re:Is it just me? (Score 1) 557

by PhuFighter (#33713124) Attached to: Selling Incandescent Light Bulbs As Heating Devices

I want to know what I can look for on the packaging, to tell me that the lightbulb I'm buying has an acceptable warm-up time (5 seconds would be OK, I suppose)

Of course, this is opposed to the brightness of incandescent bulbs, right? Those old bulbs actually get dimmer with time. Obviously, you can't trust what you read on the box then, either.

Comment: Re:I hate the new bulbs. (Score 1) 557

by PhuFighter (#33712116) Attached to: Selling Incandescent Light Bulbs As Heating Devices

don't have a source here, but i thought i read somewhere that the average can of tuna has more mercury than what's in a modern CFL.

So that makes it ok to use products which we KNOW will be disposed of improperly and thus will go into the food chain and eventually tuna 10 years from now will have even more mercury in it.

So 10 years from now, you will be able to say the same thing: a can of tuna has more mercury than a CFL. So use more CFLs.

It doesn't mean that CFLs are safe, it just means that there is a lot of mercury in tuna!

I think it means that you have better things to worry about. Like tailpipe emmissions.

Comment: Re:I guess you either live somewhere that's warm (Score 1) 557

by PhuFighter (#33711894) Attached to: Selling Incandescent Light Bulbs As Heating Devices

Oops... I worked out the price in pence, then wrote that it was pounds. I thought it seemed a bit expensive. But you've worked out the cost for seven years.

24h*365 = 8760h 8760h*0.0005kW = 4.38kWh. £0.14/kWh * 4.38kWh = £0.61.

(The 9W CFL would be £11, the 40W incandescent £50.)

Seven years? Crap. ok. no more math for me! Back to writing design specs....

What hath Bob wrought?

Working...