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Comment: Re:Ukraine's borders were changed by use of force (Score 1) 230

by gmhowell (#46764195) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Honestly I don't get the stance of some ppl from the US against Russia.
Russia is the best friend and has been the most loyal, the strongest and the most valuable ally for the USA. Really. At times of apocalyptic events Russians and Americans stood together. It was before and it may be again when we have to save the Earth itself. Nobody can help the US but Russia when things get hot. Alienating Russians is what make things worse.

Those things are called movies. The space aliens didn't really invade Earth.

Idiot, he was referring to the documentary about the asteroid that they blew up with the nuke. You know, when Daredevil makes out with Arwen.

Comment: Re:Shareholders profits? (Score 1) 133

by gmhowell (#46764147) Attached to: How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

Replying to myself: I assumed they would cut expenses to feed the shareholders but I was wrong. TFA explains:

Amazon generated a whopping $74.45 billion in revenue for its financial year to 31 December 2013, but just $274 million in net income, a margin of roughly 0.3 percent. It sells Kindles at cost.

Compare this with Google, which saw net income of $12.9 billion on revenues of $59.8 billion for the year to 31 December 2013, a margin on 21.6 percent; or to Microsoft, which posted revenue of $77.9 billion for the year to 30 June, with a net income $21.9 billion, a margin of 28.1 percent

Question is: how do they manage to make shareholders accept that?

I'm guessing the investors expect Amazon to become and stay the Walmart of the internet (or perhaps the Sears and Roebuck from catalog days) and be be able to either ramp up margins or pay them at that level for a LONG time.

Comment: Re:Why is this crap on the internet (Score 1) 70

by gmhowell (#46762409) Attached to: Lack of US Cybersecurity Across the Electric Grid

It was actually wishful thinking rather than faith. I've seen the same things you describe. I've also seen where things like this are swept under the rug forever. Then, the root cause analysis comes back and people flip shit because nothing was done about it in the past. Well, nothing other than ignore the recomendations of us morlocks...

Comment: Re:Ex Post Facto Law (Score 1) 583

by gmhowell (#46761729) Attached to: IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt

And yet Article 1, Section 9 makes no distinction between civil and criminal. How did the 'precedent' (pronounced 'bullshit') get set that this only refers to criminal issues?

If what he said is true, then this is yet another (out of many) example of the courts 'creatively interpreting' (in other words, modifying it with invisible ink) the constitution.

Sure, it's a wikipedia link, but it's trivial to verify.

Comment: Re:Not even much money (Score 2) 363

by Shakrai (#46759595) Attached to: Intuit, Maker of Turbotax, Lobbies Against Simplified Tax Filings

If you are a die-hard, you can download [irs.gov] the forms and send them in for the price of a stamp or two (my state forms, seven pages of paper, cost $0.70 to mail.)

You don't even have to do that. There's Free Fillable Forms, which are exactly what the title suggests. Electronic copies of all the relevant paper forms that you fill out online and E-File. It doesn't have the logic of Turbotax but it performs basic math checks and saves you the hassle of printing and mailing the forms.

I can't understand why anyone would pay a third party to do their taxes. The logic flow isn't that complicated, even when you throw capital gains and itemized deductions into the mix. I've filed the long form 1040 by hand in years when I had to deal with capital gains and losses and was able to complete it in under two hours. Who are the people who pay Intuit or H&R Block to do their 1040ez filings?

Comment: Re:also (Score 1) 168

by Shakrai (#46756621) Attached to: First Phase of TrueCrypt Audit Turns Up No Backdoors

The metadata argument wears thin on me. If my phone number is two or three levels removed from a terrorist I really don't see why it's objectionable that the Government take a precursory look at my call logs. They'll quickly find that I'm a rather boring sort, whose connection with the terrorist was likely limited to ordering the same take out, and my privacy isn't significantly impacted by having someone review my call logs after obtaining a court order.

Traditional police investigative techniques would be at least as invasive, if not more so. Ever been interviewed by the police because you're one or two levels removed from a criminal suspect they're attempting to establish a case against?

Comment: Re:Sadly, sounds like I was right (Score 1) 201

by gmhowell (#46754395) Attached to: Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

Losing Eich is going to be the worst thing to ever happen to Mozilla, mark my words.

How is losing someone that thinks 20% of his employees are subhuman not a good thing? He hates his gay employees. He publicly admitted he is a Nazi that wants to steal their rights. He gave money to a cause that attacks them. Unless you are one of them, how can you defend his kind? Hopefully it won't be that many decades before society has progressed enough to put your kind behind bars to protect the rest of us from your intolerance.

20%? Got a citation for that, or just wishful thinking?

"If John Madden steps outside on February 2, looks down, and doesn't see his feet, we'll have 6 more weeks of Pro football." -- Chuck Newcombe

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