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Comment Correlated by construction? (Score 1) 345

The AQ test has questions about social interaction and obsessiveness, but you are also asked to what extent you agree with "I am fascinated by numbers". Of course you are going to find more people fascinated by numbers in STEM fields. I wonder what results you get if you weed out the questions that guarantee correlation.

Comment Re:I've been waiting for this! (Score 2) 257

This is easier for me to grasp in the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. There is a universe in which Alice is holding "0" and Bob is holding "1", and another universe in which Alice is holding "1" and Bob is holding "0". Those two universes separate the moment Alice (for example) looks at her bit. At that point she is certain that Bob got the opposite bit.

Comment Really using a computer requires coding (Score 1) 300

If you see coding as something you use to build GUIs, sure his fuel injection analogy might more or less apply. But you can also use coding to automate everyday tasks in almost any job, dramatically increasing your productivity. Depending on your working environment you can do this using bash, Python or even Excel macros. But you do need to unlock a certain way of thinking of what you are doing that is what these coding classes should aim for, in my opinion.

Comment Re:When Helping Hurts (Score 1) 268

What terrible advice. I found a summary of that book online ( and it looks like a bunch of christian crap. A quick sample:

"Bryant Myers, a leading Christian development thinker, argues that in order
to diagnose the disease of poverty correctly, we must consider the fundamental
nature of reality, starting with the Creator of that reality. Myers notes that the
Triune God is inherently a relational being, existing as three-in-one from
eternity. Being made in God’s image, human beings are inherently relational as
well. Note that human life is not all up for grabs! God designed humans to be a
certain thing and to operate in a certain way in all of these relationships."

Then it goes on to analyze poverty as the failure of relationships, starting with the relationship to god. I stopped reading after that.

Comment Positive or negative infinity? (Score 4, Informative) 157

For most complex numbers the sequence will most certainly not converge to positive or negative infinity, whatever those mean. When dealing with complex numbers it only makes sense to talk about a single infinity, which is the point at infinity of the projective complex line (a.k.a. "Riemann sphere").

Comment Re:It depends (Score 4, Informative) 486

[...] For instance, their paper says that concatenating a million one byte strings into a single million byte string takes 274 seconds. That should take much less than one second.

I didn't RTFA, but after reading this I am certainly not going to. This C++ piece of code takes around 0.01 seconds to run on my computer:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void build_string(std::string &s, std::string r) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i)
        s += r;

int main() {
    std::string s;
    build_string(s, "a");
    std::cout s.length() '\n';

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Should I let my kids become American citizens? 3

An anonymous reader writes: Dear fellow Slashdotters,

Can you help me decide whether to allow my small daughter and son to become American citizens?

I am American and my partner is Swedish. We have both lived in Belgium for many years and have no plans to leave. I became a Belgian citizen some years ago and kept my American citizenship. My partner has both her original Swedish and now Belgian citizenship. We are not married. Instead we have a registered partnership, which is common in northern Europe, confers most of the benefits of marriage, and raises no eyebrows. However, the American government does not recognize such partnerships so in their eyes I am still single.

Generally, children of American citizens abroad automatically become American citizens themselves at birth. But our kids fall under an exception. Male American citizens who live abroad and have children out of wedlock with a non-citizen mother do not automatically transmit citizenship to their children unless they sign an “affidavit of support” promising to support their children until the age of 18. If you don’t sign before the child reaches 18, the child is not considered an American citizen. This has been upheld by two Supreme Court rulings (Nguyen v. INS and Flores-Villar v. United States). For legal beagles, the relevant statutes are 8 U.S.C. 1401 and 1409.

The kids have Swedish and Belgian citizenship. We could go down to the American consulate and get American citizenship for them any time, but I keep putting off the decision and I am not sure I want to do it at all. Sentimentally I would like the kids to have American citizenship, but there is really only one practical pro to it:

* American citizenship would allow them to live, work, or study in America more easily, if they choose, when they get older.

The cons:

* They would be immediately enmeshed in the U.S. tax bureaucracy, which would require them to file U.S. tax returns for life even if they never set foot in the U.S. This, as I know from experience, is a huge bother, even when you don’t owe anything.
* Sometimes they would owe U.S. tax, though, for example for capital gains, unearned income, and in some countries self-employment income.
* My son would have to register for the draft.
* The decision, once made, is difficult to back out of: renouncing one’s U.S. citizenship costs $2300 and a lot of paperwork.
* They can easily travel to the US for family visits as Belgian/Swedish citizens.
* There are lots of good universities in Europe. And if they really wanted to study in the U.S., it’s not too hard to do as a European.

What do you think I should do? The clock is ticking, and I find it hard to choose between the evil of not being able to be American if they choose, and the evil of unjust, lifelong pursuit by the IRS.

Yours sincerely,
A loyal Slashdotter.

Here are two good relevant links:

Comment Re:Cause meet Effect. (Score 1) 47

Although ultimately you are right, there is a useful probabilistic approach to this besides considering the theoretical value of a position. Since chess is very far from being solved, you don't really know the theoretical value of very many positions. However, you can make models for the probability of the outcome from a position (a choice of an engine is such a model). A blunder is then a move that reduces the expected score for the player that made it, by some amount.

And as others have said, he should have used Stockfish.

Comment Re:Consciousness versus Intelligence (Score 1) 455

This position seems to be popular among people that don't know the first thing about AI. So let me explain the situation from a point of view familiar to AI practitioners: A rational agent is one that acts as if it were maximizing the expected value of some utility function. That, in a nutshell, is the core of making decisions under uncertainty, and the basic recipe for a large part of AI. As part of the design of a utility-centered AI system, you define the utility function, which is precisely how you would tell the machine what to want. None of this "boggles the mind". It is almost trivial, actually. The difficult parts are perception, how to model future events to evaluate the expected value of the utility function in different scenarios, etc.

Comment Re:Here comes a Karma hit.... (Score 1) 107

I was programming at her age (BASIC on some 8-bit computer), and I turned out OK. My parents weren't very happy that I spent many hours a day in front of the computer, but that's what allowed me to have a great job as an adult.

I would just let the girl do whatever she is interested in.

Comment Re:I'm not a scientist... (Score 4, Funny) 99

According to Anses, the process of assimilating a three-dimensional effect requires the eyes to look at images in two different places at the same time before the brain translates it as one image.

Isn't that how normal vision works anyway?

That's why France doesn't allow children under the age of six to open both eyes at the same time.

Diplomacy is the art of saying "nice doggy" until you can find a rock.