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Comment: Re:I work in Seattle (Score 1) 296

Sprawl is less efficient. People who live in dense cities consume much less than sprawl SFH suburbs - frequently 1/10th as much. We drive less (many of us use walking, bikes, or transit, or drive short distances) and use less energy.

Face it, we're better than you.

Yes, you urban types are better than we suburban and rural types. Good for you!

I'm happy to raise my kids in an environment where we have plenty of space and sunshine in our backyard to grow vegetables, and have lots of wildlife (birds, squirrels, rabbits and deer) roaming around. You can keep your view-blocking eyesore buildings.

And lest you think I am describing some backwoods place, my commute to work is 25 minutes into downtown San Jose. I will take that level of sprawl over some San Francisco or NYC or other high-density zoo.

Comment: Re:SSDs (Score 1) 162

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49576287) Attached to: New PCIe SSDs Load Games, Apps As Fast As Old SATA Drives

First it says that the new PCIe SSDs achieve "much higher" speeds and "destroy the competition" and then it says that they don't really load anything faster and average consumers will hardly know a difference?

What?

I'm sure someone already did this, but...

Car analogy -
1. You have a Corvette (the PCIe SSD) and a Prius (the SATA SSD).
2. Targeted benchmark is a racetrack, where the Corvette beats the crap out of the Prius.
3. Normal consumer usage is driving from your house to the corner store, where the Prius is just as fast as the Corvette.

So the PCIe SSD is technically faster than its SATA counterpart, but you might not notice any actual difference in performance across your normal computer workload.

Comment: Re:SSDs (Score 1) 162

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49576157) Attached to: New PCIe SSDs Load Games, Apps As Fast As Old SATA Drives

Dude you might want to look up "Intel SSD killswitch" as you do NOT want an Intel SSD, as instead of doing the logical solution if one finds failing sectors (which would be alert the user and turn it into a WORM drive so they can get their data off) Intel SSDs throw a killswitch and on next boot your drive and all your data is trashed as Intel's killswitch kills the drive....no matter how many good sectors you have left!

I did that search (with and without quotes) and found squat. Can you please provide a hint, such as Intel model number? A sweeping generalization as you have made hardly seems accurate, since Intel uses a number of different controllers/firmware in their SSDs. For example, the Intel SSDs that use SandForce controllers do not have any such behavior.

Comment: Re:lead to over-applying and under-applying (Score 1) 292

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49231191) Attached to: Do Tech Companies Ask For Way Too Much From Job Candidates?

I have found (while reading through resumes trying to find candidates) that the response of most applicants to this phenomenon is to just apply for jobs for which they aren't really qualified at all, because no one is completely qualified. Which leads to probably the exact situation employers are trying to avoid (having tons of unqualified people apply)

Indeed. I post a job requiring 10 years' C development and I get new college grads applying. Come on!

Comment: Re:It cuts both ways (Score 1) 292

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49231179) Attached to: Do Tech Companies Ask For Way Too Much From Job Candidates?

I'm not sure how to solve it. Recruiters aren't the answer -- they're often the offenders in this case, editing the candidate's resume. I think the only "solution" would be to guarantee at least a phone interview to everyone who applies, just as a basic BS filter. That doesn't scale, but if candidates can't trust job descriptions and employers can't trust candidates, what's the fix?

This. I finally realized, after several extremely BS'd resumes, that I need to phone screen candidates in order to not waste my team's time on interviewing such exaggeraters.

Also, most recruiters aren't the answer, as you said, but if you can find the *right* recruiter, it can really make your life easier. I finally found a decent recruiting agency, and they are feeding me much better candidates than any internal recruiters ever did.

Comment: Re:Required & Beneficial (Score 1) 292

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49231143) Attached to: Do Tech Companies Ask For Way Too Much From Job Candidates?

Hiring is a tricky business.

Agreed!

An appropriate degree from a decent school tells me a lot about you, along with your past work experience. The lack of a degree isn't a dealbreaker but you better be damn impressive everywhere else.

I disagree. I have interviewed people with and without degrees, or with degrees in a different field (physics instead of CS, etc.), and there seems to be very little correlation between a qualified candidate and one who attended a decent school with the appropriate degree.

As for past work experience, many people embellish their resumes with their team's achievements, such that you need the interview just to figure out what they actually have done in their career. Same goes for the "skills" portion of the resume. So, you know assembly language? "Yes, I took a class in college." So, you have experience in Python? Oh yes, I've written several text processing scripts. I wish candidates would annotate their listed skills, such as "3 years Python development" to at least distinguish themselves from people who have simply heard they should put Python on their resume.

Comment: Re:how ? (Score 1) 324

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49178179) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?

How is a logic analyzer going to help? During bootup, the microcontroller is going to read encrypted firmware code from the flash, so snooping that will be useless. The decryption process itself will take place in the RAM internal to the microcontroller, which isn't exposed on any external pins, so no snooping.

Comment: Re:how ? (Score 1) 324

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49161933) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?

If somebody REALLY wanted to rip off the firmware, they'd just unsolder the chip and buy a matching reader for about $50 from digikey.

I just posted this a few comments up, but applies here, as well:
For microcontrollers that have firmware stored in an external flash, any company that values their IP will encrypt their FW before writing it to flash and decrypt it during boot up.

Comment: Re:how ? (Score 1) 324

by OffTheWallSoccer (#49161847) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?

Very often the JTAG port is simply left open.

Most any project engineered by smart people will indeed have disabled JTAG for production units. To not do so is to invite security, IP and possibly liability issues.

The CPU is typically connected to external flash anyway. Worst case you have to unsolder the flash and read it that way.

Many microcontrollers have onboard flash, whose contents can be configured to not be readable by external means (i.e., address/data pins). For microcontrollers that have firmware stored in an external flash, any company that values their IP will encrypt their FW before writing it to flash and decrypt it during boot up.

A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that works.

Working...