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Comment: stupid right away (Score 1) 92

by NotInHere (#48463605) Attached to: Firefox Will Soon Offer One-Click Buttons For Your Search Engines

unless I use a screen-keyboard, I need to change my hands from the keyboard to the mouse and back again for this "one-click-experience". Thats stupid. My setup has "one keypress search" (ok actually two if you count whitespace), which is far more better. I use an already existing feature. My most important search sites get such shortcuts. My current prefixes are:

w : en.wikipedia.org
s: en.wiktionary.org
d: duckduckgo.com
a: web.archive.org (link down? just paste URL, pos1 and a + space)
g: google.com
y: youtube.com

Best thing is, it isn't cluttered up with all that ebay or other sites. Disadvantage of course is that I have to set it up on each computer I use firefox on.

Comment: Standards (Score 1) 323

by NotInHere (#48437545) Attached to: The EU Has a Plan To Break Up Google

A company should be abled to offer any services they want, but they should have to make sure they don't create lock-ins, eg through their own proprietary standards. If whattsapp users could communicate with skype chat users, we'd get rid of lots of problems. Its like with energy. There are lots of devices, but they all work with one energy grid, at least with the EU connector. And still, there are only a few large energy companies running most of the power plants. But when I have to buy new devices the moment I switch the energy company, I think twice before the switch.

+ - Leaked documents show EU council presidency wants to impair net neutrality

Submitted by NotInHere
NotInHere (3654617) writes "The advocacy group "European Digital Rights" (EDRi) reports from leaked documents that the presidency of the council of the EU Italy plans to remove vital parts from the telecommunications package that introduced net neutrality. The changes include removing the definition of "net neutrality" and replacing it with a "reference to the objective of net neutrality", which EDRi critizises impair enforceability. Also the proposed changes would allow ISPs to "block, slow down, alter, degrade or discriminate" traffic in order to meet "obligations under a contract with an end-user to deliver a service requiring a specific level of quality to that end-user". EDRi writes that "[w]ith all of the talk of the need for a single digital market in Europe, we would have new barriers and new monopolies."

The council of the EU is one of its two legislative chambers. The EU parliament can now object or propose further changes to prevent the modified telecommunications package from passing. Currently, Italy is presidency of the council of the EU."

+ - Android botnet evolves, could pose threat to corporate networks->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "An Android Trojan program that's behind one of the longest running multipurpose mobile botnets has been updated to become stealthier and more resilient. The botnet is mainly used for instant message spam and rogue ticket purchases, but it could be used to launch targeted attacks against corporate networks because the malware allows attackers to use the infected devices as proxies, according to security researchers."
Link to Original Source

+ - If Philae were nuclear powered, it'd still be alive today

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "After successfully landing on a comet with all 10 instruments intact, but failing to deploy its thrusters and harpoons to anchor onto the surface, Philae bounced, coming to rest in an area with woefully insufficient sunlight to keep it alive. After exhausting its primary battery, it went into hibernation, most likely never to wake again. We’ll always be left to wonder what might have been if it had functioned optimally, and given us years of data rather than just 60 hours worth. The thing is, it wouldn’t have needed to function optimally to give us years of data, if only it were better designed in one particular aspect: powered by Plutonium-238 instead of by solar panels."

+ - In major shift, Firefox to use Yahoo search by default in US->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Google's 10-year run as Firefox's default search engine is over. Yahoo wants more search traffic, and a deal with Mozilla will bring it.

In a major departure for both Mozilla and Yahoo, Firefox's default search engine is switching from Google to Yahoo in the United States.

"I'm thrilled to announce that we've entered into a five-year partnership with Mozilla to make Yahoo the default search experience on Firefox across mobile and desktop," Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer said in a blog post Wednesday. "This is the most significant partnership for Yahoo in five years."

The change will come to Firefox users in the US in December, and later Yahoo will bring that new "clean, modern and immersive search experience" to all Yahoo search users. In another part of the deal, Yahoo will support the Do Not Track technology for Firefox users, meaning that it will respect users' preferences not to be tracked for advertising purposes.

With millions of users who perform about 100 billion searches a year, Firefox is a major source of the search traffic that's Google's bread and butter. Some of those searches produce search ads, and Mozilla has been funded primarily from a portion of that revenue that Google shares. In 2012, the most recent year for which figures are available, that search revenue brought in the lion's share of Mozilla's $311 million in revenue."

Link to Original Source

+ - Medieval Times: Congress Suggests Moat to Protect White House->

Submitted by PolygamousRanchKid
PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) writes "Acting Secret Service director Joseph Clancy on Wednesday faced a number of tough questions from the House Judiciary Committee about the fence jumper who made it deep into the White House. But along with the tough questions, Clancy fielded a couple eyebrow raising suggestions on how to better protect the president’s home.

“Would a moat, water six feet around, be kind of attractive and effective?” Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., asked with trepidation.

What is likely to happen, though, is that the 7 foot 6-inch fence currently circling the White House gets heightened, Clancy said. Renderings of the new fence are expected in the next few months.

Until then, the Secret Service is relying on a low-tech solution.

“We have a bike rack there now, which we know is not going to prevent someone from jumping the fence, but it’s going to allow us to have a little more time to react,” Clancy said.

C'mon Slashdotters . . . surely we have wackier ideas than a moat . . . ?"

Link to Original Source

+ - Obama Posts Net Neutrality Petition

Submitted by Bob9113
Bob9113 (14996) writes "President Obama has posted a petition for net neutrality, targeted at the FCC. The page reads: Stand up for net neutrality President Obama is taking a stand to keep the internet open and free. Add your name to tell the FCC you support the President's plan to protect net neutrality."

+ - Nasty Code Execution Bug Found in Android

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "There is a vulnerability in Android versions below 5.0 that could allow an attacker to bypass ASLR and run arbitrary code on a target device under certain circumstances. The bug was fixed in Lollipop, the newest version of the mobile OS, released earlier this week.

The vulnerability lies in java.io.ObjectInputStream, which fails to check whether an object that is being deserialized is actually a serialized object. Security researcher Jann Horn discovered the vulnerability and reported it to Google earlier this year.

Horn said via email that the exploitability of the vulnerability is difficult to judge.

“An attacker would need to get a malicious app onto the device in order for this to work. The app would need no permissions,” he said. “However, I don’t have a full exploit for this issue, just the crash PoC, and I’m not entirely sure about how predictable the address layout of the system_server really is or how easy it is to write a large amount of data into system_server’s heap (in order to make less accurate guesses for the memory position work). It might be necessary to crash system_server once in order to make its memory layout more predictable for a short amount of time, in which case the user would be able to notice the attack, but I don’t think that’s likely.”"

Old programmers never die, they just hit account block limit.

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