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Comment Re:uhhh (Score 1) 545

IANAL, Even if that is true, the router is rented, so it belongs while he pays his connection. In my country and I think in most countries, a landlord can't enter in any of his rented houses without consent of the people who live there. By your way of thinking Verizon could enter your network even if you protected it, just because they own the router.

Verizon still owns the router. To use your apartment analogy, just because you rent an apartment, does that give you the right to change out the locks and not give the landlord a copy of the new key?


Submission New Mac OS X rootkit to be revealed at Black Hat-> 7

Trailrunner7 writes: "Both Windows and Unix have been hit with numerous rootkits in the last few years, but Macs have been immune. Until now. Mac hacker and author of "The Mac Hacker's Handbook" will unveil a new Mac kernel-mode rootkit that takes advantage of OS X's Mach OS heritage. The rootkit, called Machiavelli, gives the attacker complete control of a remote machine and is quite difficult to detect, according to an interview with Dai Zovi on"
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Submission Intel Redies GNU/Linux Friendly ACPI Replacement-> 3

twitter writes: "ACPI was designed to harm free software. Ten years later, ACPI still has problems but has Intel turned over a new leaf? H-Online has an interesting introduction to Simple Firmware Interface.

A few days ago, version 4.0 of the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) specification was released, weighing in at a hefty 727 pages ... there are still flaws in many implementations.

Intel is now developing the Simple Firmware Interface (SFI) especially for small and low spec devices like Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs) with Atom processors, and is particularly targeting the Linux operating system... SFI can be implemented in addition to, or as an alternative to ACPI, in the firmware either within a classic BIOS, (U)EFI, or with alternative firmware like OpenFirmware.

Version 0.6 has been released as a draft and there is a reference implementation for the 2.6.32 kernel."
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Submission Bozeman, MT speaks up, city at a loss->

indrora writes: "Yesterday, the city of Bozeman, Montana decided to put into effect the ridiculous bill that made applicants for city jobs to pony up their usernames and passwords on what equivocates to be any website or system they use. The residents baulked at it and began to deluge the city officials building with emails and phone calls in protest. This morning, they held a closed-door hearing to determine what to do. They have not however said anything about what the result was (granted, they will have to soon, because of the Open Meetings Act). The local news station held a vote; the results? Astonishingly un-astonishing:

As of 10 a.m. 6,454 people had voted in a poll on asking "What do you think of the City of Bozeman requiring job applicants to provide social network site login and password information?" So 6,347 people have voted "I'm against it — It's an invasion of privacy," 62 people have voted "I'm for it — It's important for the City to judge the applicant's character," and 45 people have said they don't care either way.

The same local news station has a consistent stream of updates that those interested can take a look at."
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Submission Money For Nothing and The Codecs For Free->

Davis Freeberg writes: In an in depth discussion on the codec industry, CoreCodec CEO and Matroska Foundation board member Dan Marlin shares his thoughts on the growing popularity of the MKV container, confusion in the marketplace between X.264/MKV and DivXHD and weighs in on a controversial decision by Microsoft to block third party filter support in future versions of Windows media player. His interview offers a behind the scenes look at an important piece of technology that is helping to power the P2P movement. It also raises the prickly question of whether or not Microsoft is abusing their OS monopoly, in order to rein in competition within the codec industry.
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