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+ - Famed Hacker Barnaby Jack Dies Days Before Black Hat Conference->

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "A shocking and sad day today in the security industry. Well known hacker Barnaby Jack has passed away, sending a shock through the security community. Jack, a famed white hat hacker, was scheduled to present at the Black Hat conference on Tuesday, and present research on vulnerabilities in implantable medical devices.

Shocked reactions hit the Twittersphere on Friday, as many in the industry conveyed their condolences, shock, and even disbelief, hoping new of the death was some sort of hoax.

"I just wake up and heard this, really sad, I can't believe this, no words," Cesar Cerrudo, CTO, IOActive Labs, said in an email to SecurityWeek.

Barnaby Jack is probably best known for his ATM hacking demonstrations, which he likes to refer as “Jackpotting”, and has performed at a few conferences, including a demonstration at Black Hat 2010 that got media attention around the world.

The San Francisco Medical Examiner's office told to Reuters that Jack had died in San Francisco on Thursday, but did not provide additional details."

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Comment: Re:Nope. (Score 1) 884

by Nibbler(C) (#28223337) Attached to: Could a Meteor Have Brought Down Air France 447?
Hmmm... Correct if I'm wrong but the speeds don't matter here, do they? ATM the meteor goes through the plane's flight level the plane is either there or not. It could actually be sitting on the ground and the odds are still the same. Nobody is aiming the meteors at the planes (I hope) so it's random ie. all about possibilities. Now, if we have schrÃdinger's cat inside the plane with no windows, then it's all quantum physics to me if the cat will get hit, or not. Either the plane is on the path of the meteor or it isn't, simple as that.

Comment: Occam's razor = weather in this case (Score 5, Informative) 884

by Nibbler(C) (#28223147) Attached to: Could a Meteor Have Brought Down Air France 447?
As exciting as meteor or motherships would be, I still think that simplest reason hold true in this case. An ex-Air Force weatherman, gives quite a low down on the weathersystem directly on AF447's path at the time the last messages came. http://www.weathergraphics.com/tim/af447/

Comment: Re:Why cant the plane twitter? (Score 1) 884

by Nibbler(C) (#28222997) Attached to: Could a Meteor Have Brought Down Air France 447?
I think it could also have something to do with fact the boxes are supposed to record as much as possible until the bitter end. So in the event of (almost) complete system failure it could still record cockpit conversations and pressurization changes etc, while having not studied the issue I still suspect that it's hardwired into the internal systems for a reaso. I definitely think the planes probably should send the information (location, airspeed, altitude, etc) in almost realtime versus every once in a while like tehy do now. I wonder if there are any security reasons for the delays in relaying the information.

Comment: Re:E85 (Score 1) 894

by Nibbler(C) (#28093881) Attached to: The Great Ethanol Scam
An important thing also is to compare the life-cycle carbon footprint for any given fuel, transport costs, fertilizers etc. I have a Flexi Fuel car that runs also on Bio-Ethanol. I decided to go with that since there is a (finnish) company that has created a bioethanol fuel that is produced from waste and industrial side streams. It's not that readily available yet (only 3 stations within 20 miles from my house), but the idea is so great and the car will also run on normal fuel. You can see here (St1, the company) the carbon footprint comparison to other fuels, Brazilian sugarcane included. At least this far north, the ability to create the fuel here and distribute it without shipping it across oceans is a pretty effective way of reducing emissions.

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