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Comment Effect sizes are microscopic (Score 3, Insightful) 132 132

The two "significant" effects, for cardiology and neurology, are increases of 0.07% and 0.06%, respectively. Not 7% and 6%, but 0.07% and 0.06%. These are the smallest effect sizes you will ever see published. Effect sizes of that tiny size can easily be explained by decisions on which data to use, how to analyze it, etc. Even if those effects were real, those effect sizes are too small to care about. Nothing to see here. Move along.

Submission + - There aren't a trillion different smells after all->

Neuronaut137 writes: Last year a paper in Science magazine reported that humans can distinguish a trillion different odors (http://www.bbc.com/news/health-26638085), a result that had already made it's way into neuroscience and psychology textbooks. Two new papers just published in eLife overturn that result, pointing to fatal flaws in experimental design and data analysis (http://gizmodo.com/humans-probably-cant-smell-one-trillion-different-smell-1716250845). Oh, well; thinking I had a superpower was fun while it lasted.
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Comment Re:wow only 77 (Score 1) 1053 1053

Yes, it does. Those statistics don't count illegal immigration, and despite that the U.S. immigrant population percentage is still higher than every European country other than Luxembourg and Switzerland (second list), and the immigrants in those two countries are typically wealthy to begin with. Since the comparison here was between the U.S. and Europe, the greater immigration rate does make a difference. I'm not making a point one way or another about the merits of immigration policy, but these are facts that need to be taken into account when evaluating health care outcomes. Has someone found any sort of comparison in health outcomes between insured, median-income, non-obese, non-smoking, non-alcoholic citizens of various countries? Until we have seen this data, how can we separate the gross statistics currently reported into the effects of: a) Access to health care. b) Quality of health care for those with access. c) Lifestyle choices.

Comment Igor (Score 1) 250 250

Igor Pro can be extended with C code (compiled into libraries called XOPs), or code written in its own internal language. The support from the developers for both the parts they've written and for the parts you might write, as well as the support from the user base, is the best I've ever seen, by a mile. The graphics and the GUIs are also cleaner and more professional looking than any other software I've seen.

Comment Re:Rail, no thanks (Score 2, Insightful) 897 897

You're also forgetting one additional thing:

Driving is focused labor, and riding transit isn't.

Unless you're an incredibly reckless misanthrope, you can't read a book or work on your laptop while making a 5 hour drive. Riding a train or bus you can. 5 hours of getting work done at the rate I bill is a considerable amount of money. Even if I was just reading for pleasure, that 5 hours is worth a lot more to me than the few tens of dollars I *might* save from driving. So unless the thrill of driving the open highway is something you'd pay many tens of dollars an hour for, riding transit makes more sense, all other thing being equal.

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