Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Technology will turn this all upside down (Score 1) 264

by Nelson (#47872021) Attached to: Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use

As a thought experiment, I've been pondering how we need to change our police and how we can with some of this technology. Wearables seem novel and like they could very easily be factored in as evidence in certain crime situations, it seems like it has to be after the fact though. More fundamentally, with cameras and the different recognitions and perhaps a few other sensors, I cannot imagine a case where we wouldn't be able to detect weapons in a crowd in a public space, maybe within the next 15 years.

Say for example you could, with a high degree of confidence, identify the absence of guns in a crowd or report that n people out of this crowd are most likely carrying weapons, you could instruct the police on how to engage them, whether or not they need to have lethal weapons or not. Likewise, maybe even as a service, you could be notified if there were too many weapons in your vicinity or something to that effect. That seems like a very interesting and increasingly possible service. Is concealed carry protected as a privacy? There will be some interesting problems, the militarized police will likely never want to relinquish their weapons, even if they knew there were engaging unarmed people, I have no idea what their excuse will be (other than weapons help them to present an image of power and authority) And I suspect that concealed carry folks will be upset of others around them know about it and react to it. There will be some interesting policy challenges and this stuff seems like it is almost certainly coming down the pipe.

Comment: Re:I don't get it. (Score 1) 195

by Nelson (#46188411) Attached to: IBM Looking To Sell Its Semiconductor Business

How is semiconductors not a core business for a company that still makes huge profits off mainframes and midranges?? Sure, keep design in house, but you'll lose the flexibility you have. Imagine your research division came up with an amazing new chip design they wanted to work on right away, but were told "Nope, it'll take 6 months to ramp up GlobalFoundries, TSMC, or whatever. Sorry."

Actually, if they can partner with a fabrication company and get the quality they need it will increase their margins. Fabs are expensive and just not worth it until you have massive volumes. Old IBM would buy up a stake (or more likely, keep a stake) their partner and it'll almost certainly be whomever buys their current fabrication ability.

Look at Apple, they don't have a fab... It's odd to me that this issue strikes such a cord, IBM has a checkered history at best in this department. More importantly, the game has shifted from raw cycles and MIPS to performance per watt and while they've done some good stuff in that area a contract fab that can chase the field can probably do better. There was a good block of time, a decade, where IBM owned POWER end to end and it was mediocre compared to the competition. Ideally they can focus more on their designs and make them even better. It's also very clear that they have a new product family they are focusing on, they've made some bold predictions about how big the Watson market will potentially be and if they can really productize that stuff and make it work as good as it worked on Jeopardy without a support staff then I simply don't see why everyone won't have a Watson in 15 years. They are going after that. I'm 14 years removed from IBM but that looks like it's potentially an exciting development.

It's just changing. Answer me this, realistically, what do any PC makes bring to the table any more? Apple brings it all, they are the odd one. HP? Dell? etc..? They take intel parts, they take other 3rdparty parts and integrate them, then they take software from MS and charge a premium on the whole thing. It's a commodity business. It can absolutely be done as well by China and India and other countries. Is there any special skill in assembling those parts? I don't mean this to offend anybody but all of the PC business is going to and should migrate to wherever the labor is the most plentiful and inexpensive. If anything, it seems shocking that all those companies haven't bailed out of that business years ago. Fabing chips in particular seems like a business already designed for that.

Comment: Maybe nuclear should figure out how to be safe (Score 1) 551

by Nelson (#46163583) Attached to: Should Nuclear and Renewable Energy Supporters Stop Fighting?

The nuclear industry seems a lot like the American automotive industry, and maybe for good reasons. They've had to fight political battles and prove themselves against fossil fuels in and early on people were not concerned with global warming.

I know there are prototype "meltdown proof" reactors but why aren't they the norm? Anything to do with output and cost? Fukushima's best plan now is to freeze the ground for I don't know how many years? It's going to cost half a billion dollars to build the system but it might need to stay in operation for decades... maybe longer? The costs at Chernobyl are still in the billions and it's not making energy any more, that's just to keep the already ruined land from getting worse.. These things are pre-optimized for nearer term profits for the operators and the longer term clean up costs in the rare (but not so rare it never happens) even of a disaster and the longer term waste storage costs just aren't factored in, not on the correct scale at least.

I know we have thorium an there are some compelling options that seem like there could be abundant, affordable energy for ages to come without contributing to global warming but the downsides are staggering and more importantly, we actually experience the downsides, they aren't impossibly rare. I don't think the problems are such that solutions cannot be engineered but it seems like they're more focused on other things than building the best nuclear solutions..

Comment: Re:Not as bad as the reviews made it seem (Score 1) 178

by Nelson (#46092009) Attached to: IBM's PC Junior Turns 30, Too

IBM and Intel rocked that model for another decade, if you look at the PS/2 line up, half of them were very nearly obsolete when they were released. Intel had it's SX chips..

What kind of reality distortion field do you think that team had? I don't mean this in an offensive way but the Mac was demonstrated and announced at nearly the same time, (with it's own "SX" style 16bit bus 32bit chip...) People talk about the Apple reality distortion field but I can't imagine what being on the PC Jr. team must have been like when the Mac dropped... "Oh, people don't really care about graphics and stuff..." or "well, this is a business machine, not a toy..." or what on earth did you tell yourself?

Comment: Re:When you have a bad driver ... (Score 1) 961

by Nelson (#45584903) Attached to: Is the Porsche Carrera GT Too Dangerous?

That Porsche may have 600 hp, but in the hand of an excellent driver, it would be still a very safe car.

Nothing against the Porsche, but it would never be a "very safe car" regardless of the driver, the better the driver, the less likely you are to find out how "safe" the car is but that doesn't make the car safer.

As I have gotten older, I've become less offended by the Fast and Furious movies, they're just fun movies, that's all. From the news, it sounds like everyone involved had fun and enjoyed each other, that makes it somewhat sad, they didn't seem to take what they were doing too seriously and they were just making fun movies and having a good time. I say this without intending to be an asshole but that car was a chainsaw without a safety guard, it's meant for expert drivers and tracks, this is exactly the outcome that makes that so. Being in some car movies and maybe some celebrity sports car races doesn't make you a professional racing car driver. I'm absolutely certain this wouldn't have been the outcome if they were obeying the traffic laws or in a lot of different (albeit less sexy) vehicles. Also, there are a lot of dead really really good racing drivers, guys who were among the best in the world and at the tops of their games when they made a mistake in a very unforgiving vehicle.

Comment: Re:What's good for others apparently is no good fo (Score 1) 355

by Nelson (#44686391) Attached to: Break Microsoft Up

Nobody is denying them the ability to push for a unified vision. The market just isn't buying it. This isn't a punishment people are imposing, they think it's the way to let the good assets really fly highly. And it also happens to be an easy way to kill the bad assets.

Does Xbox need to be part of MS to succeed? If so why? If not, could it really dominate Nintendo and Sony on its own?

How about bing? If they lived and died by their own revenues, would they get more hungry?

The idea a lot of people have is that MS simply does too much, not that they don't have a unified vision but they have that vision, a giant legacy and a lot of cruft.

Comment: Re:New features? (Score 1) 147

by Nelson (#44123423) Attached to: Review: Oracle Database 12c

HBase and Hadoop is a very interesting option for certain kinds of data. It becomes more and more interesting as you add more and more machines too...

I have no idea how the data is structured or how it is queried and worked with but HBase may be a very interesting option. Once you dork around with the configs a bit and get it booted up, it's insanely easy to scale it.

Comment: Re:Extremely expensive (Score 1) 735

by Nelson (#42288069) Attached to: Solar Panels For Every Home?

We live in Colorado (300+ days of blue sky and sun shine) and were greeted with a similar story. To cover our normal usage, we'd need a $26,000 system and with all the rebates and what have you, we'd still need to shell out $12,000. 6 to 8 years to pay for itself.

It's not crazy crazy expensive, I think it's in the range of something a homeowner can purchase. Maybe get an equity line of credit if needed. However it's on the high side. If it was in the 5000-8000 range? I think we'd have easily done it by now.

Comment: Re:Time to let it go... (Score 1) 317

by Nelson (#41669471) Attached to: Reiser4 File System Still In Development

You mean journaling and some other features migrated to ReiserFS...

It pushed some issues, also went about things the wrong way with the community.

Fundamentally, and this is an issue that caused community issues with Reiser pushed on it initially, a filesystem's integrity is paramount. People trust it to safely store data. Reliability tradeoffs for performance doesn't cut it; regardless of the benchmarks. The other thing, how committed is the community to taking care of it? Last thing you want is a couple terabytes of data on a disk that you cannot read. The geek boys that want to simply run benchmarks might get a kick out of it but it's devastating when you lose data to something you trusted..

Comment: Re:Old news (Score 1) 147

by Nelson (#41464117) Attached to: MIT Researchers Show Dash Font Choice Affects Distraction

Wasn't New Century Schoolbook demonstrated to be noticeably easier to read in large scale tests? ALl the subtle things, the serifs, the a-spacing and c-spacing. I could have sworn I saw a study on that from like the 70s.

The problem is, the easier to read NCS font is ugly to look at. There are intermediate options, but sans-serifed fonts with simple lines and curves have a better looking style. A car in particular is a difficult blend of style and function.

Comment: Re:How to write without political bias? (Score 1) 221

by Nelson (#40157639) Attached to: Statisticians Investigate Political Bias On Wikipedia

It's more than that. They do statistics to try to identify language patterns and then associate those language patterns with bias.

That might be a very reasonable approach, in fact it might be the best we have but I don't think the language patterns are that great at identifying bias so much as they identify the bias of constituents. Freakanomics radio had an show about this a while back. The closest you get is a couple derivatives away from the actual intent, you chart politicians and their level of 'loyalty' then you chart their speech patterns and think tanks they frequently quote and then you compare the usage of newspapers and other articles to those speech patterns. It's better than nothing but they also identified that papers with more bias tend their bias toward their customer base. Read: papers in conservative places tend to be more conservative or at least use speech patterns that are consistent with conservative speech patterns and the same is true for liberal places.

Seems like more liberal folks in more conservative places would adopt the conservative speech patterns but not the intent. The intent or actual viewpoint doesn't always match the choices of words, does it?

Comment: Re:no 5th? (Score 4, Insightful) 1047

by Nelson (#38803723) Attached to: US Judge Rules Defendant Can Be Forced To Decrypt Hard Drive

The difference? There are a couple but the first of which is that the lawyers and judges involved are not stupid, they may not be techsters but they are almost certainly not stupid and this encrypted data is but one piece of evidence and you f-ed up long before if you're in this position. Second, there is a judge that will judge.

If you pistol is stolen or lost, you have some obligation to report it as such. It's typically registered and in that case, they know you have it, know the make and model. If you conveniently discover that it is missing when a court requests it they can check to see if you reported it lost or stolen beyond that, there is a judge there to judge you and he'll judge your credibility as he sees it from your behavior up to that point. Basically, keep track of your weapons, particularly when you're getting ready to be involved in a trial. Are you the kind of person that loses a pistol and forgets to tell anyone?

The password isn't quite the same. They may have some idea if you regularly used the computer. Again, I'll reiterate a couple things, the other guys aren't stupid and you didn't get in this position simply because of an encrypted drive. Now if you've spent 3 years doing something considered crime and there is other testimony where you've suggested you don't remember something because it's on the computer you use daily and now you don't remember the password, I can tell you how I'd judge you. Or maybe it's on the computer you resisted handing over and kept in a safe, those factors might not be admissible in the case against you but they certainly come in to play when you attempt to "forget" the password. Do you regularly use computer and keep track of dozens of accounts and passwords but this one computer you had locked up in a safe at your mothers house that you tried to pretend didn't exist, you forgot how to log in?

What will a judge think from your story?

Our informal mission is to improve the love life of operators worldwide. -- Peter Behrendt, president of Exabyte

Working...