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Comment Re:Interesting argument (Score -1, Troll) 62 62

The communication is between humans and humans. A human at one end craft content and store in on a computer in a accessible format. The end user then crafts a request for that information and sends it via the internet and the stored communication from the content creator is then delivered to the end user.

So you are an author who sits in front of a word processor and writes a magazine article ("crafting content," in your language). That article is then printed in an "accessible format," called a magazine. The end user (reader) then "crafts a request" by sending in a magazine subscription request, and the content is then delivered to the end user. Sound about right? We should definitely regulate magazine publishers, making sure that they can't decide how many to print, how many pages to create, which advertisers they should contract with, how often they publish, or which letters to the editor the choose to print. Because we can't have all of that unfairness, especially if the publisher decides they'd rather make arrangements themselves to deliver their printed material to news stands or find other ways best suited to their advantage to get their publication in the hands of their audience.

their claim basically is that an answer machine hooked into a phone service means that it is no longer a telecommunications service

No, that's you making stuff up. The telecommunications service is the telephone service between you and the answering machine that happens to answer the call. The telephone service between the two end points is no different when you talk to an answering machine than when you talk to a person who answers the call instead. It's exactly the protocols, the same bandwidth, the same use of the resource during the exchange ... makes no difference, answering machine vs. human.

A network of computer networks passing routable packets around based on peering agreements between the operators of those separate (frequently privately owned) networks is NOT the same as making a phone call.

that email is not communications

I get it, now. You're being deliberately obtuse. You're trolling.

Their point is that having some servers pass around packets of information using a protocol like SMTP is exactly NOT like making a phone call. If you're saying that anything that is a form of communication is the same as a phone call, then please get back to hand-delivered daily newspapers, for example, and explain why that process shouldn't be subjected to the laws that impacting the publisher of a web site who wants to fatten up the network routes - even if it costs money - to make sure his audience gets a good, timely view of the content.

Their claim is so laughably stupid that the court should penalise them for making it.

As laughably stupid as not knowing how to spell "penalize?" Your half-baked vitriol on the subject is an example of exactly why this topic is a bad fit for most people, cognitively. Please don't do things like vote if it involves similarly complex subject matter. Thanks.

Comment Re:List of privacy violations (Score 1) 132 132

From what I could see, the features that actually invade privacy are optional. The collage was highly misleading, including such things as "Windows Update being mandatory" and "Malware protection only being able to turn off temporarily" as "privacy violations" when they're actually both just things that suck.

Comment Re: So much stupid (Score 1) 102 102

So you're saying that even with uber-militarized police nothing can be done about gangs?

Of course something can be done. But it's politically incorrect to do so. The most violent gangs are thick with illegal aliens from Central America. The leftier side of US politics really wants to be able to take legal Latino votes for granted. So they angle for policies that do everything possible to avoid ruffling feathers in that area ... including giving sanctuary to people who end up being enforcers for MS13, etc.

To deal with gangs like that, you have to actually arrest people and then once they're in prison, actually keep them there. We don't do nearly enough of that - the revolving door has those guys right back in action after short terms, and their habits of recruiting minors for a lot of their dirty work means little or no jail time for a big part of their operations. If they're deported, they just show right back up because we have a completely porous, unenforced border. That's only true because the federal government isn't bothering to do one of its main missions (controlling the border), and that is a 100% political problem. The existence and violent toxicity of powerful, organized, nation-wide gangs (like MS13) in the US is then left to local law enforcement to deal with.

So yes, when they move to deal with a place known to be protected by a bunch of MS13 soldiers, you better believe they want to show up with heavy equipment. Would you bring a nightstick to arrest a bunch of MS13 enforcers who consider killing police officers, cartel-style, to be a sport and a point of pride?

But none of that has to happen. Controlling the border and not tolerating tens of millions of illegals in a shadowy cash economy rife with internal, organized crime - it's a matter of political will. But because there are politicians who are too timid to talk plainly about it, and who would rather play identity politics in a craven hunt for votes, we have a system that perpetuates rather than addresses the problem. And the local cops get to risk their necks as a result. If I were in that line of work, yeah, I'd want an armored car when serving warrants, too.

Comment Re:Seems like a piece is missing (Score 1) 124 124

they can rule against them in an international tribunal

The Philippines' attempt to haul China to an international tribunal is a problem because it is invoking the very compulsory jurisdiction which China has disavowed since 2006. But even if the Philippine attempt to arbitrate fails, any marshaled argument can subsist, and that case may be fielded in other venues. If a military engagement were to ensue, the same case could be brought to the United Nations Security Council -- the principal repository of enforcement powers under the UN system. A state can be found to be in violation of a substantive legal norm even without a coercive or compulsory judgment in a given venue, provided, of course, that there is truth to the argument supporting a violation, and that it is acknowledged by an alternative venue.

While China is disavowing the UN Convention of the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) against the Philippines, it is expressly invoking UNCLOS provisions in its claims against Japan -- so it wants to have its cake and eat it, too. In 2009, China submitted a claim over the Senkaku Islands (which, like Scarborough Shoal and the Spratlys, are believed to be fuel rich) and turned to UNCLOS rules in defining and delineating its continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone, again within the meaning of UNCLOS. There is some international legal doctrine supporting the view that a state's acts in one place can be used as an admission and adversely bind that State in another set of circumstances.

a legal claim against china won't make the han imperialists move, but the ruling will stay dormant

then, after any sort of conflict in the future where china loses, china is going to lose these islands in the peace treaty

Comment Re:magic unicorn wipe public information law (Score 1) 295 295

It is a private agreement between the French and a corporate entity.

wow! really? did you read the fucking sentence right after the one you quoted genius?

I have no idea what you are talking about with "music sharing" since I never mentioned it once. I'm going to assume you are trolling at this point.

http://slashdot.org/comments.p...

What a laugh. They can certainly do so. All they need to do is ask Google and Google needs to agree to it in order for it to happen. DMCA requests to Google already expunge data from Google IN ALL COUNTRIES, not just the US.

any other help you need today moron?

at this point i have to conclude you're just trolling me

Comment Re:Convenient (Score 1) 109 109

i'm not a nice person. and this is not couple's therapy

if someone says something stupefyingly dumb (on a "news for nerds" website no less), they deserve to be pilloried

i understand the concept of educating the ignorant patiently. but then there is stupidity so amazing there is no hope

prideful ignorance exists in this world. it resists logic reason and patience. such stupidity needs to be attacked for the cancer it is (irony intended). blind and dumb people actually cause real damage in this world

Comment Re:magic unicorn wipe public information law (Score 1) 295 295

Um, no. I never said that. Read it again. And use caps.

i understand exactly what you said. and i additionally understand that your comment does not address the actual topic. i will use caps just as soon as you actually try to understand the fucking topic in front of you, and then commenting

furthermore, to actually follow you down your lame red herring topic change, just to completely show your idiocy (as if you confusing music sharing with "right to be forgotten" didn't do that effectively enough):

you don't think that all sorts of countries twist the arms of all sorts of multinationals for all sorts of lame reasons already? that's just corporate life. this isn't new or even noteworthy

the hard line, the important point, is that the sovereignty of a *country*'s laws is not subjugated to the fickle bullshit of another country's ignorant laws

of course governments often go into treaties and agree on limited exceptions to their sovereign laws. these situations are narrow and up for constant review. that's fine too

but i can guarantee you no US government is going to respect French requests to censor based on this useless "right to be forgotten" band aid, ever. the request will be laughed at and waved out of the room, as it should be

finally, if france does kick out google, the usa reciprocates against french companies operating in the usa for the fickle bullshit of a logically incoherent and invalid law. so france won't do it, or they will hear from their influential multinationals

any questions? any other remedial hand holding you need today on this topic?

Comment Re:magic unicorn wipe public information law (Score 1) 295 295

it is a moral issue

and france has the wrong understanding of the topic and the immoral position

additionally, if france does kick out google, the usa reciprocates against french companies operating in the usa for the fickle bullshit of a logically incoherent and invalid law

Comment celebrate science and vaccines as a great good! (Score 2) 109 109

news like this makes me so mad. because it demonstrates something wonderful we as a civilization have achieved time and again. something that should be applauded and celebrated and championed:

1. disease, unfair deaths

2. science, hard work by intelligent people

3. vaccine, innocent lives saved

it's obvious, straightforward, undeniable, a wonderful good

against that we have prideful ignorance, that continues to claim the lives of innocent children and others, simply because of their various paranoid conspiracy theories, lies, and petulant low iq

in a just world, those who don't vaccinate die from ebola

in the real world, those who do vaccinate protect those who do not, and when the herd immunity breaks down, because of the unvaccinated, the vulnerable innocent and the unlucky few who got a vaccine but it didn't take hold, also die

UNIX is many things to many people, but it's never been everything to anybody.

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