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Submission + - Historians Rediscover Einstein's Forgotten Model of the Universe

KentuckyFC writes: In 1931, after a 3- month visit to the US , Einstein penned a little known paper that attempted to show how his theory of general relativity could account for some of the latest scientific evidence. In particular, Einstein had met Edwin Hubble during his trip and so was aware of the latter's data indicating that the universe must be expanding. The resulting model is of a universe that expands and then contracts with a singularity at each end. In other words, Einstein was studying a universe that starts with a big bang and ends in a big crunch. What's extraordinary about the paper is that Einstein misspells Hubble's name throughout and makes a number of numerical errors in his calculations. That's probably because he wrote the paper in only 4 days, say the historians who have translated it into English for the time. This model was ultimately superseded by the Einstein-de Sitter model published the following year which improves on this in various ways and has since become the workhorse of modern cosmology.

Submission + - TurboTax sells access to your data (

rcharbon writes: I had the apparently naive expectation that I’d retain some small scrap of privacy by using the TurboTax desktop app instead of the web version. However, their failure to keep a certificate revocation list up to date revealed that Intuit installs third-party cookies from Neustar, an ad service that “provides audience insights that increase online advertising relevancy through the power of verified offline consumer data.”

Submission + - Researchers Apply Invisibility Cloak to Free-stand (

Zothecula writes: We've previously seen — or should that be "not seen" — invisibility cloaks in the laboratory that are able to render two-dimensional objects invisible to microwaves. Such feats relies on the use of metamaterials — man-made materials that exhibit optical properties not found in nature and have the ability to guide light around an object. Now researchers at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) claim to have brought invisibility cloaks that operate at visible light frequencies one step closer by cloaking a three-dimensional object standing in free space with the use of plasmonic metamaterials.

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