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Comment Heavily flawed experiment, reporting, or both (Score 0) 210

It sounds like what they did was take whisky that had not been aged yet, put it in a glass vial with piecies of the charred oak barrels and sent it up to the ISS. They then compared this to the whisky of the same batch which had been properly aged in oak barrels.

Obviously this is going to age differently, as it would age differently if the same vials were on Earth. I doubt that if treated with the same temp, darkness and lack of turbulence that it would be any different from the same vials aged on Earth.

However, there's a reason why we don't age whisky by simply storing it in tanks with charred chunks of oak.

Instead we keep them in oak barrels that are aged in varying temperatures that cause expansion and contraction, bringing the whisky in and out of the wood. The whisky is also aged for varying amounts of time to reach the perfect taste characteristics based on the conditions they experienced.

Certainly though, those that commissioned the "experiment" were far more interested in marketing than science.

Comment Re:Pebble Time (Score 1) 213

The Apple Watch certainly costs more, and if that's a priority then the Pebble would be the way to go, which can be said for most premium or higher end products.

The Apple Watch has better sensors, better integration, a better screen, UI, and UE. Siri works really well, as does the haptic feedback. Even the features Pebble "matches" the Apple Watch with, it's far from really matching. Try making a phone call with it without a connected headset. Try going on a hike and getting an *accurate* measurement of distance, heart rate (min/max/avg), and calories burned). The list goes on and on.

As for the battery life, I take my watch off every night and let it charge so the Pebble has no advantage there any more than the fact that it's Android compatible didn't give it an advantage.

Again though, if battery, Android compatibility, and cost were the criteria, the Pebble would be a better match, but other than that, the Apple Watch is better in every way.

Comment Re:Pebble Time (Score 0) 213

Because your feature comparison to the Apple Watch is totally ridiculous. If we have the money, we'd rather have something that does all of that and more (except for the Android compatibility, which we don't care about).

I had a Pebble, it was fantastic for me until the Apple Watch came along. I'm sure the Pebble and Pebble Time are still fantastic for others as well, but don't pretend you're getting the equivalent of an Apple Watch for less money.

Comment Re:As a matter of fact... (Score 3, Insightful) 408

"...Microsoft would make and BUNDLE their own implementation..."

Yep, that was a very real threat. I saw that happen to companies that didn't sell to Microsoft, and I was at companies that developed stuff with the thought of Microsoft taking us over in mind (that was usually a mistake).

Comment Storage not Memory (Score 2) 264

The title says Memory, but they're talking about Storage.

The answer is that a lot of people use less than 16GB of storage. The more interesting question is why the 32GB doesn't exist.

I think it's because people either don't use much storage at all, like my mom or girlfriend who just use the iPhone for email, Safari, Twitter, Words with Friends, Facebook, and streaming music. For them, 16GB is more than enough.

Once you start collecting music, photos, videos and such, 32GB is not nearly enough, so 64GB kicks in. While 32GB would be enough for those in between casual users and media collectors... say those that just take a lot of pictures, but nothing else, the numbers of these people are too small to support a 32GB offering in the line up and Apple is better off bumping these people up to 64GB.

Comment Re:Why buy a product that you're going to jailbrea (Score 2) 136


Because I'd rather have an iPhone than any other phone and an iPad than any other tablet. If they have to be jailed, then so be it. On the other hand, once I get my device, it's just that much better when it's jailbroken. I'm not rewarding bad behavior. Apple made their choice of how they wanted the platform to be, and most people are perfectly fine with that choice. My personal protest to the contrary wouldn't change one thing.

Comment Re:So in other words, it will be just like Firewir (Score 4, Insightful) 355

"Heck, wasn't the iSight the only webcam for Firewire? "

Nope, not even close. Not only were there dedicated FireWire based webcams, but almost every digital video camera had FireWire (and could be used as a webcam) until they went from tape to flash/HD.

People who see FireWire as some kind of failure must have been completely absent in the digital video industry for almost a decade.

Comment What shocked me was how stupid it was (Score 1) 164

Wow, it got just about everything wrong in analyzing my profile. Right off the bat it shows a picture of my girlfriend that it thinks is me. It shows pictures of people I have a high level of interacting with, one of whom is George Tekei who it says it doesn't recognize and I've only briefly met once at a political fundraiser. It also doesn't recognize Wendy Davis (running for governor of Texas) even though the picture they used isn't one I took, but an official campaign photo.

The commonly used words are out of context and were only used once each... Fire, Breast, Parties:

Photo from an Arcade Fire concert.
Photo from Breast Cancer fundraiser.
"I rarely go to parties unless they're for a political or charity event".

The "we can find you" shows a concert venue that is the 4th most common concert venue that I go to (only twice in the past year). This despite the fact that I have my home town listed and do check-ins at places there all the time.

My income is about 1/3 of what it actually is and wouldn't come close to paying for any of the vacations I posted about, or the property tax where I listed that I live, or for my boats and cars. This one surprised me the most, since I list where I got my graduate degree and the titles of my jobs and companies I work(ed) for.

The password attempts didn't even come close. My close friends and family could guess my "dummy" password really quickly (the password I use for sites I don't care about). My other passwords I wouldn't expect to be guessed at all since they're all different and randomly generated.

Now all of that said...

Ya, I see the point. There is data to be mined, and as foolishly as it is mined, it can be used even though the chances are high that it will be misused due to incorrect analysis.

I'm not sure what the answer is. Initially, I thought having a profile allows you to at least project what you want your profile to be as opposed to being off-grid, which I can't be in my profession. Now I'm realizing that increasingly, the issue may not be humans individually making assessments based on manually viewing your profile but by using very, very stupid tools.

Imagine this... an HR person looks for your profile and sees you're off-grid, ok toss that resume. They do a manual inspection and see you're high risk or acceptable. That's what we were dealing with, but now the HR person may get access to stupid tools and you could be labeled as risk for using keywords that were analyzed out of context.

(oops, according to this tool, saying this once makes you depressed)

Comment They were smart not to release it (Score 2) 272

I'm finding it funny that you kids never saw these. Around 2001 (not that long ago), there were a bunch of tablets being shown at CES that never caught on. Some were PCs as tablets. Some were more consumption like tablets, only with a lot less to consume.

They were slow, clunky, expensive. No YouTube, no videos (the storage was measured in MBs). They were heavy, had short battery lives and terrible screens.

The user experience of these things was really poor as well. Think WebTV.

This thing was nothing like an iPad. And it's not like as if you can really say, "like an iPad would've been in 2001". If you look at what most people use their iPads for, none of that would be possible/practical on the 2001 tablets. It's more like saying that Apple had a QuickTake digital camera, but it never really took off... amazing because today we all have digital cameras all over the place.

I applaud Nokia for developing a prototype to demo at CES, but it was a good thing they didn't take this to production.

Comment Re: WTF (Score 3, Insightful) 179

Everything you described is NOT default behavior. The default behavior is for iMessage not to be on. If you have an iPhone and don't turn on iMessage then texting works just as normal.

To be clear, you have to actively assign your phone number to iMessage, and then assign email addresses and devices to that account.

The whole point of iMessage is to disassociate your phone service as the controller of your SMS and have the control be given to iMessage. This is in part so that you CAN send and receive texts on things like your MacBook over WiFi with no cell connectivity and all transparently.

Sure, I can see how it may be confusing for people who stick their heads in the sand and wave their hands in the air when it comes to reading instructions, but changing the way the system works to accommodate the ignorant isn't the answer.

That's like blaming Google hosted email for hijacking a domain's email.

Why did your wife's iPad get the text message? Because she configured it to do just that. Same goes for your coworker's MacBook Air. As far as your niece goes, the phrase "after she wiped it" is false.

This comes from someone traveling in another country right now who just had to send several iMessages from my MacBook Air that would've cost $$$ in international texting had Apple not set things up the way they did.

One of the chief duties of the mathematician in acting as an advisor... is to discourage... from expecting too much from mathematics. -- N. Wiener