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Comment: I can't have it! (Score 1) 287

by Mirey (#35510018) Attached to: Advocacy Group For the Blind Slams Google Apps
So no one can!

I really don't understand this mentality. Because a small minority of the population can't use someone, we should restrict it from everyone. I'm not saying that people shouldn't make the effort, but sometimes it's just not required, or its too much extra effort. If I had to make a free app blind-friendly, that could be a lot of extra work, so it might end up not being created.

Screw it, we shouldn't even be allowed sight! Everyone should wear blindfolds, else its just unfair!

Comment: xbox kinect (Score 1) 110

by Mirey (#35502418) Attached to: EvoMouse Turns Your Digits Digital
couldn't the kinect do this?

I couldn't see a price, but this looks like it would fall under the "expensive gimmicky gadget" price range. At least with a kinect when you get bored of using it with a mouse, you can do something cool with it. I'm sure this would be either close to, or even more expensive than, the kinect.

Comment: Re:First Invent AI (Score 1) 467

by Mirey (#35502300) Attached to: Scott Adams Says Plenty Would Choose Life In Noprivacyville
That wouldn't be too difficult. Depending on the granularity of the data available. If you use a competitors brand, send them a free sample, if they use your product, try and push a higher priced one? The real question is, would it be worth it? A complex AI isn't needed, or even needed. You would need to look at each person individually. Get a computer to number crunch for you, and you're away! Contrary to what most people believe, with computers/AI, it doesn't have to be all or nothing. You are allowed to use them as a tool.

Comment: Re:Obvious issue in a no-privacy world (Score 1) 467

by Mirey (#35502226) Attached to: Scott Adams Says Plenty Would Choose Life In Noprivacyville
Not necessarily. You /could/ see what they looked like. If they weren't appealing to you, there is no reason to look it up. Of course, should you look up someone using that system, that person could find out you looked at them (ad infinitum) There is a lot of information out there, that, just because it is available, doesn't mean I want or even care to find out about it.

Comment: Re:Do you want a university or a trade school? (Score 1) 583

by Mirey (#35470008) Attached to: CS Profs Debate Role of Math In CS Education
Yeah. The phrase "trade school" shouldn't be seen as a bad thing. At the end of the day it comes down to egos. People want to be seen as smart. If someone went to a trade school, and another to university, people will think the university kid is smarter.

Though I do think that knowing theory and applying it is easier than knowing the applied use, having to generalise frmo that, and then reapplying that to something else. (So I'm for the maths in a CS degree).

Comment: Re:Do you want a university or a trade school? (Score 1) 583

by Mirey (#35469964) Attached to: CS Profs Debate Role of Math In CS Education
At first this was my first response, but he may have a point. The prof might be from a university that doesn't have it's priorities right when it comes to what modules are taught. A higher ranked (League tables are such BS btw) university, or rather, a better university might have more relevant modules.
I don't understand how people can be very good at judging how CS is taught at all Universities, even though they've have only been to 1 as an undergraduate*. My highschool was particularly bad, I didn't generalise that and say all highschools are bad.

Although, it does read like a snide remark.

*I kept it to undergraduates. If you go somewhere as a masters student or a Ph.D student, you probably would have no idea what the undergrad course is like.

Comment: Re:Simple Solution (Score 1) 583

by Mirey (#35469932) Attached to: CS Profs Debate Role of Math In CS Education
"Basically, computer science uses a lot of discrete math, and a lot of vector/matrix math. Universities don't have a lot of general education courses that teach discrete math or vector/matrix math"

It sounds like you're generalising from your university to all universities. In my first year we had 2 discrete maths modules and a general engineering one(basic statistics, calculus, analysis etc). After that, all modules that need something new get taught by the module that needs it. For example, in a data modeling module, we got taught about Bayesian statistics and all the other relevant mathematical concepts.

I'm not saying that every University gets it right, I'm just saying that generalising from your university to all universities is a bit silly.

Back on topic, teaching someone how to do something specific is silly, especially when the computing world moves so quickly. Maths lets you teach generalisations which you can easily apply to new situations.

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