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Comment: Same in Oz, this happened to me. (Score 1) 619

I had to resort to plastering the guy's block of units with the screen captured photo of the location, *and* deduce his employer's name, and send the address there with an explanation. Turns out the guy just 'found' it and was meaning to return it anyway. Uh-huh.

So anyway, when the cops take the report, tell them (when they ask) that the ipad contains information which may be of use to terrorists. Your porn stash might give aid and comfort, right? At that point, I imagine, they will be bashing the door down to get it back.

Finally, and most surprisingly ... Apple will happily continue to allow the thief to download new software (including, of course, reflashing the device) even if you inform them of the theft, and even if you accompany it with a police report of the theft ... why should Apple care, they're making money both sides of the deal, right? Apple 'support' 'explained' to me that it was technically impossible for them to refuse to allow a thief to make use of Apple's facilities to reflash the iPad into a valuable commodity. Apple 'support' admitted that there was a hard-wired serial number, that the iTunes crapware could read it, and that it could send it to the servers, but ... no ... technically impossible. It'd be a different story if someone were stealing something of theirs, I guess.

Apple Scum.

My next iPad will be a Samsung.

Comment: Re:Peh. (Score 1) 754

by Minix (#38200760) Attached to: Paper On Super Flu Strain May Be Banned From Publication

Someone infected with the 1918 flu strain has a significantly better chance of recovery under modern medical care than their 1918 counterpart.

Change that to "marginally better" and I might agree with you. There is still no effective treatment against a cytokine storm reaction, which is what primarily killed people in 1918.

Isn't there also the problem that you need uninfected people to administer the modern medical care. Sure, that's why RNs and MDs are among the first to be immunised, but still it wouldn't take much to bring down the health systems even in an advanced country.

Comment: Re:What you mean "we?" We don't count. (Score 1) 1040

by Minix (#38010194) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Unity/Gnome 3/Win8/iOS — Do We Really Hate All New GUIs?

"Some day, you will be able to carry a phone, and dock it to a keyboard, mouse and display and use it as a full desktop with all your apps and data. Or use it as a tablet, in a different dock." - M.Shuttlesworth.

This is the 'vision.' With a simple dock, and a healthy dose of kool-aid, you will be able to turn a mouse into a finger, and a big wide screen with no touch capability at all into a touch-sensitive screen. The only thing missing is the part where a mouse behaves even slightly like a finger, and a display behaves even slightly like a touch screen.

Then, instead of relaxing your forearm on a desk and making small precise hand gestures with a mouse, you will be able to either use the mouse to drag the cursor (which you can hardly see) across large distances to precisely hit a sensitive area which you can also hardly see. OR, you will be able to wave your arms around wildly while gesturing at this vertical surface with your fingers ... except of course your forearm and upper arm muscles will quickly tire from all the effort.

We tried this in the lab, and the results are in: hand-waving is the way of the FUTURE!

Comment: What you mean "we?" We don't count. (Score 1) 1040

by Minix (#38010118) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Unity/Gnome 3/Win8/iOS — Do We Really Hate All New GUIs?

From the previous Slashdot article about this debacle (the one where Shuttlesworth says "power users" are all wankers for not loving the Unity) one is directed to https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/882274/comments/36 and then http://design.canonical.com/2010/11/usability-testing-of-unity/ which states that the usability of Unity was tested on 15 people, where "Of the 15 participants recruited, 13 were Windows users, 1 was a Mac user, and 1 used both Windows and Mac. None of the participants was familiar with Ubuntu."

This is jumping the shark with *lasers*

Comment: Re:Not necessarily. (Score 1) 1040

by Minix (#38010104) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Unity/Gnome 3/Win8/iOS — Do We Really Hate All New GUIs?

Tested, you say? Read this and weep: http://design.canonical.com/2010/11/usability-testing-of-unity/

It states that the usability of Unity was tested on 15 people, where "Of the 15 participants recruited, 13 were Windows users, 1 was a Mac user, and 1 used both Windows and Mac. None of the participants was familiar with Ubuntu."

Comment: Re:Half standard (Score 1) 124

by Minix (#35814792) Attached to: Tcl Announces NaTcl: Native Client Tcl
Oh, one more!

* Tcl has Safe Interpreters - as someone else noted - you can selectively hide, block or emulate commands in a cascade privilege model, so you can have a sandbox within a sandbox, if you want to. You could write a safe interpreter which executed third party code in a completely untrusted environment. That was a big feature of the Tcl Plugin for FF too. Very advanced security model.

Comment: Re:Half standard (Score 1) 124

by Minix (#35814758) Attached to: Tcl Announces NaTcl: Native Client Tcl
| Can someone comment on ANY technical advantages that Tcl would have over Javascript

Good question. I'll have a bash at answering this, but of course it's just personal prejudice really, and it's all arguable:

* Tcl has unicode built in from the ground up - makes a difference if you're not an English speaker.
* Tcl is string based, all values are strings, it's very good at string manipulation.
* Tcl is event driven from the ground up - good at networking and interaction. Coroutines in the core.
* Tcl isn't locked into OO, although you can use the blessed OO when you want to.
* Tcl is elegant, has truly excellent introspection, it's extensible.
* Tcl has heaps of webby and networking stuff, libraries full of it.
* Tcl has Tk - and NaTcl will soon have NaTk - which gives you a really excellent GUI definition language.
* If I had to give a beginner a task and had a choice between JS and Tcl, I think I'd go for Tcl. So much of JS is beginner code, and perhaps the world would be a better place if it weren't.
* Tcl is fast to develop in, and (contrary to some opinions) quite good at large complex systems.

I could go on about it all day, but the bottom line is I know both JS and Tcl, I would prefer to use Tcl. YMMV, and you should use whichever language suits you.

Comment: Re:I don't understand the obsession with canvas (Score 1) 124

by Minix (#35808460) Attached to: Tcl Announces NaTcl: Native Client Tcl
Tcl has libraries to parse, manipulate, and generate SVG. http://wiki.tcl.tk/TclSVG We find Tcl easier than Javscript to write such utilities in. YMMV, of course. Being able to bring those facilities to bear for web applications is part of the motivation for NaTcl, so there's no implied choice or preference for Canvas over SVG, just that we haven't had time to adapt and write SVG generators ... now we have that opportunity.

Comment: Re:Is libTk on the way? (Score 1) 124

by Minix (#35807644) Attached to: Tcl Announces NaTcl: Native Client Tcl

Uh...the GUI builder is called HTML and the Tk library is called the DOM. Did you only ready the Tcl part of the headline?

Not quite. We have a Tk front-end which generates HTML and CSS sufficient to present a very nice GUI in browser-native look and feel. At the moment, it runs on the server. We will be porting it to NaTcl next. In my experience, it's much simpler and neater than DOM and HTML.

No amount of careful planning will ever replace dumb luck.

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