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Comment Re:I hope not. (Score 3, Informative) 113

It does, because teachers are expected to utilize methods that support common core

Could you please provide an example? I teach high school math and I have not felt pressured by the Common Core to use certain methods, so I'm genuinely curious. To me, it sounds like the real problem is with lousy administrators micromanaging teachers, not with the standards themselves.

Comment Re:I hope not. (Score 5, Informative) 113

Common Core isn't a curriculum, it's a set of standards. It does not have anything to do with homework, instruction methodology, grading rules, or anything like that. See for yourself. If your district is using shoddy curriculum like Engage NY, that is their fault.

I'm not saying that the CCSS are beyond criticism, but the criticism should be accurate.

Comment Why risk it? (Score 3, Insightful) 871

His advice ignores the benefits of leniency if you're guilty and you're almost positive you'll be caught anyway. For most of this discussion I've been focusing on the merits of talking to the police if you're innocent. But Officer Bruch also says that if people in the interrogation room answer questions and cooperate, then even if they're ultimately convicted, the police do testify to the judge that you were cooperative, and the judge can take that into account and reduce your prison sentence. That is at least theoretically another legitimate reason to violate Professor Duane's "Don't Talk To Cops" rule, if you're 99% sure that the police will find enough evidence to convict you anyway, you can hope for leniency by cooperating.

Would it not be more beneficial for your attorney to arrange some plea deal? As somebody who is not an expert on criminal law, I would keep my mouth shut until I talked to my attorney. I'd let the expert on criminal justice decide if it was worth confessing instead of hoping for the best.

Comment Re:This is a social gimmick (Score 1) 114

According to the summary and article, you only need three of five codes. I suppose of 3 of your friends are out-of-contact, then you're SOL for the time being, but I suppose that is better than having a weaker, easier-to-compromise system. When choosing your five friends, it might be wise to select people from different circles of friends to decrease the likelihood that multiple trusted contacts are out-of-reach at once.

"Survey says..." -- Richard Dawson, weenie, on "Family Feud"