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Comment: No they aren't (Score 1) 1009

by Matimus (#42097665) Attached to: Is Intel Planning To Kill Enthusiast PCs?
You can't take one particular configuration of one processor and assume that Intel is trying to kill the enthusiast PC. Guess what, the atom processors in phones are soldered down too, oh no, enthusiast PC dead. If you want to know if Intel is going to kill the enthusiast market just ask whether or not it makes them money.

Comment: Re:Must past this test (Score 1) 508

by Matimus (#41479095) Attached to: California Legalizes Self Driving Cars

It is legally defined as a privilege. States do restrict who drives and who doesn't. You have to obtain a special license from the government in order to drive a vehicle on public roads. If you are found to abuse your privileged then that license can be revoked.

Effectively you are restricted from driving from birth without due process. You must go through a process in order to gain the privilege.

You have a right to freely travel, that doesn't mean you have a right to a specific form of transportation.

Comment: Re:Must past this test (Score 4, Insightful) 508

by Matimus (#41466169) Attached to: California Legalizes Self Driving Cars
I have known a few terrible drivers in my life. Despite their friends, and occasionally strangers, telling them that they were terrible drivers, multiple collisions in which vehicles have been totaled, and even collisions with pedestrians, they still believed that they were good drivers. Individuals may not be the best judges of whether or not they can drive better than a machine.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out. How the public perceives it. How it is marketed. How it is handled by insurance companies.

Comment: Re:What gives? As long as it's close enough... (Score 3, Informative) 62

by Matimus (#40771753) Attached to: The HP Memristor Debate
I came here to say precisely this. It isn't an 'ideal' component. Which is what the theory is based on. But then neither is any electrical component you can think of. Even resistors stop being linear at very high or very low voltages / currents. Anybody ever seen an ideal current source? An ideal voltage source? And ideal op-amp? Its not ideal because it is a real device. Ideal components only exist on paper.

Comment: Re:No CI? No version control? (Score 3, Insightful) 362

by Matimus (#37682850) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Standard Software Development Environments?

I've been in that position. It worked out. It was also much more difficult than I initially thought it would be.

I break my career growth into two areas: learning from the examples of those around me, and learning on my own. To maximize your growth you will need a good mix of both types. There are likely experienced people who can teach you many things wherever you go. What you really need to ask yourself is whether you value the types of things that you can learn from your co-workers in this environment. In this case, they can't teach you much about tools and process. What can you learn? If you can't think of anything that interests you then this sounds like a dead end, and you should probably leave.

Comment: Re:Keep up or shut up (Score 1) 785

by Matimus (#34920754) Attached to: Should Younger Developers Be Paid More?
Agreed. There are developers who continue to learn, read and hone their craft. Individuals who pick up new technologies and strive to improve at what they do. Those developers should be rewarded. They should be given every opportunity to advance and get more pay.

All of that being said. A market is a market. The article makes it sound like they did look at training individuals internally, but decided to go with hiring some outside developers to help them jump-start the process. If that is what it costs for that type of talent, then that is what you must pay. Do I think it is fair? No. If I worked where that happened would I learn the new technology anyway? Yes. Would I try to prove that I am a better developer than the new hires? Yes. Would I demand a pay raise after? Yes.

Comment: Re:Cold weather (Score 1) 572

by Matimus (#34680718) Attached to: Ford To Offer Fuel-Saving 'Start-Stop' System
My guess is that in a modern vehicle will do whatever is necessary to perform the enabled functions. Turn on the car, turn up the heat and the computer will run the engine if that is necessary. Once the car is up to the specified temperature the engine will shut off again to preserve power. I suppose they could have missed this use case, but that seems unlikely.

Comment: Re:Oxygen + Beer (Score 2, Informative) 334

by Matimus (#31334588) Attached to: Scientists Discover Booze That Won't Give You a Hangover
This was my first reaction too. It would also require that the beer be pasteurized. Oxygenating (live) beer just gives the yeast more food. which it will then convert to CO2. It is a little more complicated than that, since the yeast needs sugar too. In any case you are seriously messing with the beer's chemistry. Perhaps a system where flat beer gets oxygenated just before serving would work. It might not make good beer, but is worth trying. Of course, I don't tend to drink enough beer to get hang-over drunk anyway. It just takes too long.

Comment: Re:and yet NYC still has traffic jams (Score 1) 882

by Matimus (#28871903) Attached to: Rude Drivers Reduce Traffic Jams

Are you talking about people matching speed at 45 in a 65 or are you complaining about people matching speed at 65 in a 65? The former is understandable, but if it's the latter, why should I make room for you to break the law (go over 65)? Sure, it's your choice to speed, but I don't see where I should feel bad about doing the speed limit. When signs say "slower traffic keep right" they mean slower than the speed limit. Grandma Moses shouldn't be in the far left lane doing 50 in a 70. The left lane isn't where it's magically acceptable to speed. People around here seem to think the speed limit is dependent upon the distance from the car in front of you. If you can't see anyone, the 65 is a 90. If you're about half a mile behind them, it's an 80. Quarter mile and it's a 70 until you're sure it's not a cop. Then it's back to 80 until you're 6 inches off their ass. At that point, you either change lanes without signaling (it'd require putting down the cell phone) or, if you can't pass, sit on their ass and flick your high beams on and off in their rear view mirror until they miss a turn and run off the road in a blind stupor. I actually saw a woman driving with her elbow this morning. She had the cellphone in her right hand and her left hand was blocking the sun from her eyes. Her visor was up and it wasn't even that bright out.

You aren't the police. It isn't your job to tell people how fast they should or shouldn't go. It is okay to go the speed limit in the left lane, but it isn't okay if you are the only guy in the left lane, and you are going the same speed as everyone in the adjacent lanes. If people want to speed, let them speed. One of our jobs as drivers should be to impede the others around us as little as possible. It definitely isn't your job to make sure that the people around you aren't breaking the law.

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