Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Portable checkout terminal (Score 2) 60

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46878075) Attached to: Why Does Amazon Want To Sell Its Own Smartphone, Anyway

I suspect Amazon sees the smartphone as a portable checkout terminal. Rather than leave it open to any competitors, they want to own the OS and get a peek at what you're looking for. It's also a consumption device, and is the hook to selling movies, books, etc. It may be the case that they really don't want to be in the smartphone business, but fear what a competitor might do.

Comment: Re:Actually, Audi blamed the driver (Score 1) 394

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46580099) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model S Pedal Placement A Safety Hazard?

I never had the cruise control malfunction again, but I could repeat the brake issue. Yes, these are two separate issues. But the brake issue prevents the driver from being able to stop the car.

When the car took off (I was on an almost-empty Interstate highway in Texas), I tried to brake and couldn't move the pedal. I put both feet on it and pushed as hard as I could. In the gym, I could push 600 lbs on the leg press. I could feel the pedal arm flexing under the pressure, but it would not move downward. I regained control of the throttle when I shut off the cruise control - leading me to believe the cruise control is at fault.

I demonstrated the brake problem to the dealer. They replaced the master cylinder assembly. As I drove away, someone pulled out in front of me and I could not stop for several seconds. Once again, the turbo was generating positive manifold pressure and the brakes would not move. After the manifold pressure went negative, I regained brakes. I took it back to the dealer. An older mechanic took a look and he said the check valve was worn. Once replaced, the problem vanished.

Summary:
Event 1 - runaway acceleration and zero brake
Event 2 - zero brake on boost
Event 3 - zero brake on boost.

BTW - I have raced motorcycles and cars for years, so I was quite comfortable with the car going fast. Being alone on a sunny day with no curves in sight gave me plenty of time to ponder the cause. I knew I could turn the engine off, so I wasn't in much danger. I was able to evaluate all the suspected causes. Feet on the wrong pedal? Nope. Floor mat or stuck linkage? Nope - it was easy to move and quite loose. The only other thing connected to the throttle butterfly was the cruise control. That's when I tapped the brakes - and discovered it wouldn't move. That's when I realized I was dealing with two faults. Glad I had a dashboard switch to shut down the CC. I was pressing the brakes, and suddenly it started to give slightly. I noticed turbo boost had just gone negative. I hit the gas, built up pressure, and sure enough the brakes wouldn't budge. So that part was very repeatable.

Comment: Re:Actually, Audi blamed the driver (Score 1) 394

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46579703) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model S Pedal Placement A Safety Hazard?

Nearly all the Audi issues were old people hitting the wrong pedal while parking.

And how do you know that? That was the theory Audi suggested - blame the drivers.

Your issue was unrelated to the focus of the issue at the time.

Not at all. I owned the car. I saw the 60 minutes report. People claimed the car "suddenly took off" and "could not budge the brake pedal". This was the exact behaviour that my car exhibited.

Audi claimed (as did others) that they must have hit the gas pedal, and thought it was the brake. That is quite logical. And I'm sure that happened in some cases. But I also know my car did exactly what 60 Minutes claimed.

Comment: Re:Actually, Audi blamed the driver (Score 1) 394

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46579635) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model S Pedal Placement A Safety Hazard?

Interesting that you'd believe a government agency, rather than someone who actually owned the car, had the experience, and analyzed it. You link, however, was crap. He writes:

"When I first heard about the Audi “sudden unintended acceleration” segment on CBS’s 60 Minutes in 1986, I knew instantly that they were blowing smoke. Literally."

So he made up his mind instantly. Well, he's wrong. When my Audi 5000T was on positive pressure (turbo boost), high pressure would leak past the check valve, preventing the brakes from being applied. His statement that the brakes would override the engine does not take that into account.

Comment: Actually, Audi blamed the driver (Score 3, Interesting) 394

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46569029) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model S Pedal Placement A Safety Hazard?

Audi got partial blame for their unintended acceleration problems because the brake and throttle were close enough that when it was fully depressed, the driver would have trouble telling from position which pedal was depressed.

That was Audi's excuse - but not the actual reason.

I was driving on an interstate highway on cruise control in an Audi 5000 Turbo, when the car suddenly went to full throttle. I could easily move the gas pedal up and down, so it wasn't stuck. I shut off the cruise control via a dashboard switch, and regained control. The throttle issue was clearly the cruise control malfunction. It never did it again. I could not duplicate the fault, so I suspect poor RF shielding (trucker using a hopped up CB radio?).

Yeah - I contacted Audi with the "good news" and they had zero interest. They would rather blame the customer than recall the cars.

Comment: Re:Audi - Mine took off on its own (Score 4, Insightful) 394

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46568923) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model S Pedal Placement A Safety Hazard?

Is this the same bullshit that almost made Audi pull out of the US? It looks like it.

The bullshit was Audi blaming the customers for confusing the pedals. The fault was elsewhere. I know - I owned an Audi 5000T that did this.

I was driving on an interstate highway on cruise control - my feet were not touching the pedals. The car suddenly went to full throttle. I could move the throttle pedal up and down with my foot. The brake pedal would not budge. I shut off the cruise control via a dashboard switch, and regained control. After the turbo boost dropped below atmospheric pressure, I regained brakes. I later discovered the check valve on the vacuum assist was worn, causing the loss of brakes when the turbo was on boost. The throttle issue was clearly the cruise control malfunction. It never did it again. I could not duplicate the fault, so I suspect poor RF shielding (trucker using a hopped up CB radio?).

I contacted Audi, and they blew me off.

To their credit, they stopped using the check valve method, so someone at Audi understood the fault condition. I'm less sure about the other issue. I solved the problem by deciding never to buy another Audi.

Comment: It's not the OS, or the apps... (Score 4, Insightful) 125

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46478245) Attached to: Microsoft Dumping License Fees For Windows Phone?

As a Android user (Nexus 4) and a former iPhone owner, I'm not so sure the OS is the real problem.

When I used the iPhone, it was very obvious that I was outside the Apple ecosystem. ITunes on Windows sucks, and I could tell that Apple's goal was to push me away from Windows and join the Apple world, where things "just work".

Now that I've moved to Android, it is clear that Google wants all my systems to work together, regardless of what it is or who it came from. My files stay synced between all my PCs, laptops, tablet, phone and even my old iPhone (now being used as an iPod). This is the killer app for me. Both Apple and Microsoft want their stuff to work better if you stick with their products. Google changed that game.

Sorry Microsoft. Even if you fix the OS so it's the best, and give it away free, I'm still not interested. As Sun used to say, "The network is the computer", and Google gets that - while Apple and Microsoft want to build a walled garden. If Adobe and Solidworks ever offer a Linux version, I'm gone.

Comment: Just like CALS in early Windows Server (Score 4, Informative) 125

by MasterOfGoingFaster (#46478113) Attached to: Microsoft Dumping License Fees For Windows Phone?

I doubt it. I think it's just a temporary measure so that they can get some market share and then start charging again.

Likely. When Windows Server first came out, it had no CALS. Novell Netware charged a price based on the number of users. Microsoft only charged for the OS, and was much cheaper. After they had sufficient market share, they added CALS.

It's not so hard to lift yourself by your bootstraps once you're off the ground. -- Daniel B. Luten

Working...