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Comment Re:30 years (Score 0) 394

Would have been true, if not for the environmentalist anti-nuke nuts.

Spoken like a true nutter yourself, but at least you're consistent.

For a more reasonable and fact-based view, see Maury Markowitz's reasoning: Why fusion will never happen

You can argue all the technical superiorities of fission over wind all you want - in fact, they're pretty much all true. It is a fact that wind cannot be dispatched while nuclear has a CF around 90% and provides all sorts of baseload. Here's the problem with all of those arguments: the bank doesn't give a crap.

In summary, it's economics and bankers, not some leftist boogie man that you love to point to.

Shows, again, that you know shit about any of these things.

Comment Re:A step forward, but... (Score 2) 394

Achieving practical nuclear fusion for power generation would be a very nice step forward. But "holy grail" is rather overselling it, I suspect.

Even when practical, we're still talking very big, very expensive plants that depend on a long supply chain for all its parts, the high-purity fuel and so on. When you consider the building, running and maintenance costs, and the cost of dealing with the spent fuel (much better than for fission plants of course) the energy won't be all that cheap.

And they'll be competing with rapidly dropping costs for solar and other renewables.

Quite - almost any tech advances that will help fusion will also help other energy sources.

And the cost(s) would be unbelievably huge. Multiple times a fission reactor's cost.

I found this story quite interesting - and disappointing. Essentially argues that we'll never have fusion and gives his (Maury Markowitz's) reasons for it: Why fusion will never happen.

For me, this seems to capture the gist of his argument nicely:

You can argue all the technical superiorities of fission over wind all you want – in fact, they’re pretty much all true. It is a fact that wind cannot be dispatched while nuclear has a CF around 90% and provides all sorts of baseload. Here’s the problem with all of those arguments: the bank doesn’t give a crap.

So the places that are building nukes are invariably where the local government is willing to put up the money, generally interest free. We have new reactors in China and Korea, and everyone else is doing basically nothing. Actually in the US all the money is backed by the government, and the companies have ignored it anyway. It’s just too expensive and economically risky.

Comment Re:Exceeds state authority (Score 2) 192

Very true. No idea why you're modded down to 0... you're correct.

Not sure if you read replies, but just FYI - Anonymous Cowards' posts start at a score of 0, and logged in users with reasonable karma start at 1.

Subscribers / users on your "friends list" may have a bonus point attributed to their posts, hence start at 2, although I'm not entirely sure how this part works.

Users also have an option in their settings to assign an extra point to posts that have been moderated by category, i.e. Informative or Funny if said user is interested in pushing such posts to higher prominence in their own reading. i.e. These points aren't actually attributed to the comment poster, but to the page presented to the reading user.

Comment Re:This kind of stuff is Exhibit #1 (Score 1) 282

News in Canada is just as tailored, don't kid yourself. The Sun/National Post = pro-Conservative party.

From my understanding, this is true.

The Star/Globe and Mail = pro-Liberal party.

Um, the Globe and Mail endorsed Harper in the last election.

Seems they're okay with his "national media may ask 5 questions per day, total" policy.

So it seems they see their job as not "comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable" but as purveyors for government press releases. Or something.

I find the best news for any country tends to be from sources that aren't in that country. For solid Canadian and American news, I use the BBC.

Agreed.

Comment Re:Most streetlights are wasteful (Score 1) 307

I see street lights as a waste of money.

Not just a waste of money. Most of them are a waste of fuel, ... emissions ... We could eliminate vast numbers of street lights in all likelihood with no adverse effect at all while saving a lot of money and reducing pollution.

I don't disagree with your points, however I've heard that power plants have to run at a rate that generates excess power over night (can't be shut off and restarted at dawn), therefore street lights use power that has to be off-loaded regardless.

The use of power during the overnight hours is discounted to municipalities, in some instances, as I understand it.

Hence I am not certain that they create much excess air pollution, nor cost as much to operate as one might to expect.

I could be wrong and don't have time at the moment to do much searching on the topic.

Comment Re:Exactly as many black holes as we thought! (Score 1) 92

The summary title directly contradicts the summary text. They predicted ones that they hadn't seen yet. Then they found a way to see them, and it matched up with predictions. How is that "more than we thought" at all?

C'mon, editors...

Indeed, from TFA:

The scientists pointed NuSTAR at nine candidate hidden supermassive black holes that were thought to be extremely active at the centre of galaxies, but where the full extent of this activity was potentially obscured from view.

If we simply assume that there's a super-massive black hole at the centre of each galaxy, then they have increased the expected quantity by zero if I understand correctly.

Obviously that requires an assumption, but otherwise aren't we assuming that there are not super-massive black holes at the centre of galaxies until we find each and every one?

I prefer the former assumption myself, in this particular case.

Comment Re:I gave up on some Google Apps (Score 1) 62

I have limited access to Hangouts, but is there a way to insert a carriage return into a message?

There's a little button for smileys. If you hit shift, the smiley button becomes a carriage return.

Also, how to remove the stupid fucking smilie face icon from the keyboard?

The keyboard isn't really part of Hangouts itself, and you can use an alternate keyboard. There are at least dozens of options available, and probably more. Swiftkey is fairly popular, I believe, but it has the same smiley icon (although it *does* show a carriage return as the long-press action for that button). I don't have any other keyboards installed at the moment to compare.

Thank you!

Tested it tonight. Switched from Pinyin to Google keyboard, and shift key turns smilie face into carriage return.

That solves that problem, since it's not my phone and I rarely use it.

On the other hand, on my device, doesn't seem to work. But I just don't use Hangouts, problem solved.

Comment Re:I gave up on some Google Apps (Score 1) 62

I have limited access to Hangouts, but is there a way to insert a carriage return into a message?

Seems pressing what should be "Enter" sends the message - not at all what I want!

Also, how to remove the stupid fucking smilie face icon from the keyboard?

Those two things prevent me from ever using Hangouts myself, and IMHO do a lot to dumb down communications -- as if that weren't already enough of a problem.

Comment Re:im not sure what to make of this (Score 1) 126

When race drivers go for a drive to get exercise, I'd consider driving a sport (despite the motor-sport moniker).

I'm not saying the drivers aren't fit, just that they use sports to get fit so they can drive competitively.

Which differs for other sports like soccer in which way exactly?

Playing soccer is exercise in and of itself, that's how. Of course, elite players work out so they can play soccer (etc) better, but the game itself is excellent exercise, hence it's a sport.

I think you don't understand the physical fitness required. I might understand that hopping on a F1 is not feasible, but hopping on a competitive 2-stroke 125cc go-kart is. Most newcomers last a couple of laps before they are completely exhausted.

While I don't necessarily disagree, I still don't think many (anyone?) goes for a drive for exercise, and if they do, then I'm pretty sure a coach of some sort would tell them "You're doing it wrong. Drive for practise; play sports for exercise, stamina, cardio, strength..."

Comment Re:im not sure what to make of this (Score 1) 126

"To further make the point, are bowling, golf, darts, billiards, or auto racing sports? None of them require much in the way of athleticism"

Formula 1 drivers are subjected to quite high forces, and require excellent physical condition to avoid injuries / unsafe situations.

When race drivers go for a drive to get exercise, I'd consider driving a sport (despite the motor-sport moniker).

I'm not saying the drivers aren't fit, just that they use sports to get fit so they can drive competitively.

IMHO, etc.

Comment Re:How it's done in this neighbourhood (Score 1) 105

Indeed.

One neighbour, behind us, had their garage door sliced open on one occassion, and on another had the car in their car port broken into.

The thief was a particularly nasty prick, as they used a pry bar to pry the driver's door open, using the roof as a fulcrum.

The door was bent enough to reach inside and the roof was dented.

When all the thieving bastard had to do was break glass. Thousands of dollars damage instead of low hundreds.

Prick.

Another neighbour, two doors up from them, had their door sliced and the freezer full of food in there was emptied. Frozen food!

I had my catalytic converter stolen...

I hate thieves.

Comment How it's done in this neighbourhood (Score 1) 105

Thieves just take some type of sharp blade, cut a "V" shape into the garage door, reach in (likely with a hooked tool), pull the manual T-shaped handle that's connected with a rope to the locking latch mechanism, tug it, door's unlocked.

I counted about 10 such damage marks between 49th and 54th Ave in one laneway.

The confusion of a staff member is measured by the length of his memos. -- New York Times, Jan. 20, 1981

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