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Comment: Re:Year of the... (Score 3, Interesting) 192

by MacDork (#49234129) Attached to: Steam On Linux Now Has Over a Thousand Games Available

outdated by November 2015

LOL, you didn't even read the specs did you? 6th gen intel processor. Not haswell. Not new 5th gen broadwell. 6th gen skylake. If anything, it's so cutting edge, I'd worry about it shipping in time for xmas given Intel's lousy track record with broadwell.

Also, 970m isn't going anywhere any time soon. It's going to be early/mid 2016 at the soonest before Pascal GPUs ship out of nvidia.

Also(!) Zotac tends to ship barebones systems in addition to full systems. Don't like the RAM/disk provided? Get a barebones and choose your own.

Comment: Re:Ummmm.... (Score 1) 319

by MacDork (#49084221) Attached to: Java Vs. Node.js: Epic Battle For Dev Mindshare
There are counter points to just about everything you've said.
  1. 1. Really? You don't know how to do html/css without javascript? Your SEO must be shit, m8.
  2. 2. All those 'rich' libraries are great until they don't work on IE8 or Chrome 37.0.20341. I especially love when stuff that worked fine years ago is broken today because browser updates changed the internal perfomance characteristics of the javascript vm. Simply put, doing too much on the client puts you at the mercy of client configuration changes which you have no control over.
  3. 3. Libraries, that was your argument in #2 wasn't it? Compare libraries available to Java vs Javascript on the server side. Best tool for the job, right? Sounds like you found yourself a golden hammer.
  4. 4. Can you really? How do you replicate the declaritive html5 form validation on the server? And is it really a good idea sharing your validation code, bugs and all, with the client? Sounds like a major security problem to me.
  5. 5. Let's see how your sorting goes on a table with a million rows client side.. if you're batshit crazy enough to even try that. Most of what you mentioned should and generally does get written in SQL, not JS.
  6. 6. lol, now that's just bait

Performance... you're funny. Tell me about your performance when your server falls over with memory problems and you don't have anything like visualvm to figure out why. Don't get me wrong, Java sucks in its own special ways, but I'd never choose Javascript as my primary language.

Comment: Re:Predictions have been pretty good, actually (Score 1) 786

by MacDork (#48799243) Attached to: Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

So, you've basically said that anything that relies on observations of nature is not a science.

What I'm saying is very simple. Science is the application of the scientific method. The scientific method is very well defined. Forming a hypothesis and then claiming your statistical model predicts what your hypothesis says is not an application of the scientific method. That misses several key steps.

Feel free to react with further hostility, logical fallacies, and sticking words in my mouth if you like.

Comment: Re:Predictions have been pretty good, actually (Score 1) 786

by MacDork (#48790837) Attached to: Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

Comparing it to the data, from 1967 on... looks like the experimental result matches the prediction.

Nice, an experiment. So if you could just show me where your control group is. You know, the control group that had no increase in CO2 and no increase in warming? Because, if you don't have one, how do I know some other factor didn't cause the warming you observed?

That's not science at all. That's little more than a statistical model. These guys believe they have their answer and are trying to fit all observations to it.

That's a description of deniers. That's not the way climate science is done.

The reason we believe that the model is more or less accurate is that there are terabytes of data confirming it. The reason we don't believe that alternative models are accurate is that there aren't any.

This is exactly what I pointing out. You feed data into a statistical model and call it science. You haven't conducted an experiment with a control group. You have no scientific proof. You have nothing but a statistical correlation.

Comment: Re:Stop trying to win this politically (Score 1, Insightful) 786

by MacDork (#48783731) Attached to: Michael Mann: Swiftboating Comes To Science

Feed in past climate data and see if your climate model can predict the past or the present accurately.

While I agree with most of your post, what you describe here is not science. That approach turns science on its head. The scientific method begins with a reasoned hypothesis, followed by a prediction based on the hypothesis, and an experiment to prove or disprove this prediction. Climate "science" on the other hand does exactly what you describe here. It looks at past data and attempts to fit it to a hypothesis. That's not science at all. That's little more than a statistical model. These guys believe they have their answer and are trying to fit all observations to it.

The most non-science part of Climate "science" is the regular refrain that "There's a consensus, therefore, anthropogenic global warming is proven." If anyone so much as expresses doubt about this form of proof, that person is attacked. I believe this sums up my opinion of that succinctly.

Comment: Re:This is what's wrong... (Score 1) 216

by MacDork (#48761837) Attached to: Bill Would Ban Paid Prioritization By ISPs

I don't think it's realistic at this point to expect much change from the government. Unarmed black men die by cop in the streets and that's all part of the plan it seems. Even the black president appears to do nothing but pay lip service to the problem. Internet freedom seems downright secondary when unarmed kids are being shot by cops regularly.

To the point, I think what we are witnessing is the end of what we currently understand as the internet. Net neutrality wouldn't be an issue if it weren't for the ISP monopolies in the first place. NSA spying and weakening encryption standards leaving the whole system backdoored. DMCA is the icing on the cake, destroying free speech one github repo at a time.

I fully expect wireless mesh networks to be the next generation of internet. People will laugh about the days when we were so stupid to trust Facebook servers with so much as a password. They will of course, use something similar to SSH, where the client holds the key and the password. The idea that one company could have stood as a gatekeeper between you and your pizza order from the shop on the corner will seem like pure stupidity.

It is stupidity. There's absolutely no reason those pizza order packets need to travel thousands of miles from my handset, up to a cloud server, where it's intercepted and inspected by the NSA before it is passed down another wire belonging to another ISP who's going to charge a fee or slow the order down, just to reach a pizza shop a mile or two down the road. (assuming that pizza shop didn't get an illegitimate DMCA takedown over a photo of a cheese pizza). It is simply ridiculous when every square mile of modern civilization is saturated with wireless radios. I'm sitting in range of 16 wifi access points right now. Everyone I know carries a phone with not only wifi, but bluetooth, and LTE too.

This is dumb. And when enough of us developers step back, and think, and see how very dumb it is... we will create a new solution. The dim witted management in the form of government will proceed to try to screw up our new internet as best they can, until they succeed and we start the process all over again.

Porsche: there simply is no substitute. -- Risky Business

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