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+ - CPUC Decision on Comcast/TimeWarner Merger

Submitted by Lord Flipper
Lord Flipper (627481) writes "The California Public Utilities Commission decision on the Comcast/Time-Warner proposed merger has just been released. It's not an exciting read, BUT, the 25-bullet-point Appendix to the decision is a shocker. Example:

"19. Comcast shall for a period of five years following the effective date of the parent company merger neither oppose, directly or indirectly, nor fund opposition to, any municipal broadband development plan in California, nor any CASF or CTF application within its service territory that otherwise meets the requirements of CASF or CTF."

- Whoa! Trust me, Comcast was NOT expecting this at all. Here's one more, as an example:

"8. Comcast shall offer Time Warner’s Carrier Ethernet Last Mile Access product to interested CLECs throughout the combined service territories of the merging companies for a period of five years from the effective date of the parent company at the same prices, terms and conditions as offered by Time Warner prior to the merger."

What #8 means, was confusing to me, at first, as it appears they are saying Comcast has to let current TW customers continue to use, or take advantage of, something they already have. But that's not the case, at all. "CLECs" is CPUC shorthand for Competitive Local Exchange Carrier. And the ruling by the CPUC covers all customers, now, or in the future of the combined entity, here in California. What they're talking about here, simply, is opening up Last Mile Access.

Personally, I see this as a much larger "step, but step only, in the right direction, but the ruling today is definitely a total shocker. It could nix the merger, in California, only, or... it could light a fire under the asses of the FCC, or, the "codified" long-shot: it could bring real competition to Internet access, here in California, pronto.

The CPUC is basing their entire decision on Common Carrier law (Setion 706, as opposed to Title II), and, unlike the projected FCC decision (coming around the 26th of the month) the CPUC's decision has all kinds of "teeth" as opposed to the FCC's "Title II, with forbearance" approach. It could very interesting, very soon.

Here's the link to the PDF of the Decision: http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/Publis..."

+ - CPUC Decision on Comcast/TimeWarner Merger->

Submitted by Lord Flipper
Lord Flipper (627481) writes "Edited version [Due to accidental exposure of a third-party attorney who cannot risk exposure, period]:

"The California Public Utilities Commission decision on the Comcast/Time-Warner proposed merger has just been released. It's not an exciting read, BUT, the 25-bullet-point Appendix to the decision is a shocker. Example:

"19. Comcast shall for a period of five years following the effective date of the parent company merger neither oppose, directly or indirectly, nor fund opposition to, any municipal broadband development plan in California, nor any CASF or CTF application within its service territory that otherwise meets the requirements of CASF or CTF."

- Whoa! Trust me, Comcast was NOT expecting this at all. Here's one more, as an example:
"8. Comcast shall offer Time Warner’s Carrier Ethernet Last Mile Access product to interested CLECs throughout the combined service territories of the merging companies for a period of five years from the effective date of the parent company at the same prices, terms and conditions as offered by Time Warner prior to the merger."

What #8 means, was confusing to me, at first, as it appears they are saying Comcast has to let current TW customers continue to use, or take advantage of, something they already have. But that's not the case, at all. "CLECs" is CPUC shorthand for Competitive Local Exchange Carrier. And the ruling by the CPUC covers all customers, now, or in the future of the combined entity, here in California. What they're talking about here, simply, is opening up Last Mile Access.

Personally, I see this as a much larger "step," only in the right direction, but the ruling today is a total shocker. It could nix the merger, in California, only, or... it could light a fire under the asses of the FCC, or, the "codified" long-shot: it could bring real competition to Internet access, here in California, pronto.

The link goes to the list of Public Utilities Commission documents, and the two at the top of the page are referencing "Proceeding: A1404013; A1406012"... the second of the 2 docs is the one that has the whole decidsion, including Appendix A, where all the real news is at regarding this whole deal."

Here's the link to the full CPUC document: http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/Search..."

Link to Original Source

+ - CPUC Decision on Comcast/TimeWarner Merger->

Submitted by Lord Flipper
Lord Flipper (627481) writes "The California Public Utilities Commission decision on the Comcast/Time-Warner proposed merger has just been released. It's not an exciting read, BUT, the 25-bullet-point Appendix to the decision is a shocker. Example:

"19. Comcast shall for a period of five years following the effective date of the parent company merger neither oppose, directly or indirectly, nor fund opposition to, any municipal broadband development plan in California, nor any CASF or CTF application within its service territory that otherwise meets the requirements of CASF or CTF."

- Whoa! Trust me, Comcast was NOT expecting this at all. Here's one more, as an example:
"8. Comcast shall offer Time Warner’s Carrier Ethernet Last Mile Access product to interested CLECs throughout the combined service territories of the merging companies for a period of five years from the effective date of the parent company at the same prices, terms and conditions as offered by Time Warner prior to the merger."

What #8 means, was confusing to me, at first, as it appears they are saying Comcast has to let current TW customers continue to use, or take advantage of, something they already have. But that's not the case, at all. "CLECs" is CPUC shorthand for Competitive Local Exchange Carrier. And the ruling by the CPUC covers all customers, now, or in the future of the combined entity, here in California. What they're talking about here, simply, is opening up Last Mile Access.

Personally, I see this as a much larger "step," only in the right direction, but my wife, an attorney for, shall we say, interested parties, says the ruling today is a total shocker. It could nix the merger, in California, only, or... it could light a fire under the asses of the FCC, or, the "codified" long-shot: it could bring real competition to Internet access, here in California, pronto.

The link goes to the list of Public Utilities Commission documents, and the two at the top of the page are referencing "Proceeding: A1404013; A1406012"... the second of the 2 docs is the one that has the whole decidsion, including Appendix A, where all the real news is at regarding this whole deal."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Problems with the staff (Score 1) 181

by Lord Flipper (#48960539) Attached to: The Pirate Bay Is Back Online, Properly

This doesn't seem to qualify as 'properly', eh?

No, no it definitely does not seem "properly" back. Over the last couple of days there were tons of torrents posted, attributed to "anonymous." In other words, no linked actual TPB user, nobody actually "logged in while uploading."

I'm waiting for more word, and hopefully, actions, from the old crew...

Comment: Re:No issues here (Score 1) 120

by Lord Flipper (#48947453) Attached to: Wi-Fi Issues Continue For OS X Users Despite Updates

Haven't had any issues here on iOS 8 or Yosemite.

Same here. Two MBPs (one running a selection of VPNs), and an iMac in the g-friend's office upstairs, zero connection issues. Latest Yosemite on the boxes, latest iOS 8 on phones (okay, 8.1.3 on hers, 8.1.2 on my jailbreak).

It seems like a lot of guys are using cheapo routers. Who knows?

As for bluetooth, it's a cheap-assed protocol, with very shitty bandwidth for audio. Invented on Win95 maybe?

Comment: Re:Interesting Cafeteria Story in Reverse (Score 1) 54

by Lord Flipper (#48295939) Attached to: Khrushchev's 1959 Visit To IBM

the scientist came away convinced that the Soviet Union was hopelessly behind. It had nothing to do with the rockets though. Instead, he noted that when they ate lunch at the cafeteria, the cafeteria workers had to total up their lunches using an abacus. Big propaganda show-pieces are impressive, but it's the little things that show you what's really going on.

That's interesting. I vaguely recall Krushchev being despondent about the Soviet Union's chances at matching/overtaking the US, after a visit to southern California. At one point he had asked if they were flying over the "ruling class" homes now, and when told, No, that's the mostly middle-class San Fernando Valley, the sight of so many swimming pools was like the writing on the wall for him.

"I've seen it. It's rubbish." -- Marvin the Paranoid Android

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