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Comment Re:Posted this a couple of years ago... (Score 1) 217

Thanks for the feedback.

Sorry, I was evaluating SSH security protocols and was looking to add moduli generation and DH exchanges last year.

Ideally, it would be nice to generate a high-quality moduli for each new connection. 8 minutes in your case, and more than an hour on an ARM core. Forever in terms of algorithms and network connections.

Comment Re: Don't Know How You Made That Conclusion (Score 2) 217

I've got 383 spams so far today from the new gTLD domains for this one account, it's just not worth the effort. I bounce them back the messages with a contact address "in case you received an error" Not a peep yet.

And this is *after* I rbl and rhsbl filter! I should sell this is a spam feed. 100% fresh, prime grade A spam. Yummy.

Comment Posted this a couple of years ago... (Score 5, Insightful) 217

When the NSA leaks happened, investigates this and promoted this as a possible attack vector.

NOTE - You can generate a new set of moduli like so:

# ssh-keygen -G moduli-2048.candidates -b 2048
# ssh-keygen -T moduli-2048 -f moduli-2048.candidates

Put the results in /etc/ssh/moduli

WARNING: This takes forever. Also, according to man ssh-keygen:

It is important that this file contains moduli of a range of bit lengths and that both ends of a connection share common moduli.

It's not possible to regenerate and share many moduli quickly - hence the reuse of moduli. SSH has support for x25519 algorithms - this definitely means I'll be moving away from pre-computed DH moduli also.

Comment Re:Stream 11 (Score 1) 508

That fails requirement #3, it can't be assumed that the students have the technical know how to fix up a salvation army type computer.

Sure, a techie (even a poor techie) could make that work. But when something goes foo-bar on that laptop, the teacher doesn't have the time to provide the free tech support to make it work again.

Comment Re:4/5 in favor (Score 1) 755

I disagree with you on the size of said groups. But even if you are correct, and the number of 'lazy people' out number the number of people willing to work. So what, in the grand scheme of things, these are the sorts of people who would be on welfare or leeching off of family or whatever anyways, changing welfare to a minimum income doesn't change that; it just simplifies the process by which lazy people can be lazy, and makes it so people who are currently working in the bottom most rungs of society can reclaim some personal dignity.

As someone who worked at McDonald's for several years, I can honestly claim that I put up with some pretty shady business practices, and the bosses made me feel like I should be excited that I was making $7.75 an hour. But at the time I felt trapped, because I needed the job to support myself, so I couldn't just quit. I saw several other people in the same boat, or worse (single mothers who have to support themselves and their kids). If I knew I could count on a minimum income A) most companies probably wouldn't try pulling some of the shady crap, and B) if they did I would feel free to leave that job and know I was at least going to have a roof over my head until I found the next one.

Comment Re:4/5 in favor (Score 3, Informative) 755

The free money might be useless, but I doubt it'll mean nobody will work. If the minimum income is just barely enough to pay for food and shelter well that's all people really NEED, but most people will want more than just a house and food. Also, with some exception, most people are not housecats that are content to just laze about all day doing nothing, most people want to climb the social ladder, get a bigger house, a nicer tv, pay for cable, etc. And that means working. I will agree however that it might mean that businesses need to offer a decent wage to convince people to do bottom barrel work though.

Comment Re:knack for generating profoundly useless cards (Score 1) 104

I noticed that the network, now more fully trained, could generate meaningful, novel cards. However, it also had a knack for generating profoundly useless cards. Here are a few snippets from the output: * When $THIS enters the battlefield, each creature you control loses trample until end of turn.

Not a bonus, but plenty of creatures have slightly negative effects if they cost less to summon than their positive traits might suggest.

True, but having your own creatures lose trample is unusual as a drawback to a card, it's a very very situational penalty.

* Whenever another creature enters the battlefield, you may tap two untapped Mountains you control.

Weird, but if you're prevented from tapping mana sources for some reason...

Due to a combination of how the stack works, and the majority of mana sources having the timing priority it's pretty much impossible to prevent a player from tapping a mana source for mana. The best you can really do is force the timing of it so that it's not useful for your opponent to tap a source for mana, for example if you use a spell or effect that would cause an opponent's land to be tapped, they can always tap it to add it's mana to their mana pool before the effect that causes it to be tapped resolves. Now whether that mana is usable before it drains away at the end of a phase is up for debate, but you can't really be prevented from tapping for mana. Again the above card text falls into the category of 'this could be legal on a card but it's a weird card'

* 3, : Add 2 to your mana pool.

Useful if you're tricked into a large mana-burn situation. It effectively reduces all mana-burn down to 1.

Mana burn was removed in the 2010 rules update. So again this is a rather strange ability

* Legendary creatures can't attack unless its controller pays 2 for each Zombie you control.

Oddly specific, but not useless.

Agreed, still kind of a weird ability though.

Comment Re:Have You Looked for a Job Recently? (Score 1) 413

Ok, so we fund 'public internet terminals' instead of libraries, you still have to set up, maintain, and monitor those machines. And I guarantee you that there will be miscreants who try to hack, damage, or otherwise mess with those terminals just because they can, so you DO need to provide some oversight to them. That probably means having someone who's job it is to just watch the machines, and also means getting a tech out to them when they fuck up, (or are fucked up by said miscreants); long story short it means investing in infrastructure. I don't know the dollar figures for that, but it means a lot more overhead than simply giving someone a voucher that pays a utility company for a service they provide. Maybe your way would be better for society, I'm not convinced it necessarily is.

Comment Re:Have You Looked for a Job Recently? (Score 3, Interesting) 413

I'm not sure when the last time you went to a library was, but they're a relic of a bygone age, I've seen at least 3 of them shut down, and another 2 lose their accreditation because they couldn't afford to be open more than 3 days a week. Sure, you could let people go to the library, but then you have to fund the library. Whether that would be cheaper budget wise than paying for a 5gb per month broadband connection, I don't know, but the public library system as it is now is not sufficient to really support someone looking for work.

I imagine the biggest reason that the government doesn't run soup kitchens / have a bunch of work programs is that the overhead to oversee / manage those sorts of programs just ultimately ends up costing more than just giving people food.

Comment Re:Except they just turn the power off (Score 1) 288

Yes, I suppose a baton would work well in the immediacy of the moment. However for any country that isn't part of the 3rd world, you can reasonably expect to get your day in court, so saying 'lawyer' might get your head beat in a bit, but it's still probably the right thing to do. Evidence obtained because you got beaten with a baton would be inadmissible in US courts at very least. And given the current publicity about cops using excessive violence these days, I think it's unlikely the police would stoop to those sorts of behaviors against someone who's only resistance to them is not answering self incriminating questions.

Comment Re:Giving the customers what they want (Score 4, Interesting) 216

Yup, I'm all in on the Netflix bandwagon. It, along with other streaming services (I'm a huge anime fan so Crunchyroll is in that list) are all I watch these days.

On the other hand I hope Hulu dies in a fire. I'm ok with watching ads to pay for my TV, and I have no problem with paying for a service to stream TV. I do however have an issue with paying a service to stream TV and still having to watch ads. Hulu+ is a joke of a service being managed by the same corporate assholes who made me leave cable in the first place. Netflix just beats out Hulu in terms of where you can use it (just about every possible device runs Netflix, while there's a lot that won't handle Hulu+) Heck even Amazon Prime is beating Hulu in terms of devices I see which support it. I hope the Hulu people figure their shit out eventually since there's a handful of shows I would watch (like South Park) if they had a reasonable streaming service that didn't try to double dip with both ads and subscriptions.

The trouble with a lot of self-made men is that they worship their creator.