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Comment: Re:Blocking results from certain sites... (Score 1) 171

by Lars Arvestad (#27948379) Attached to: Google Unveils Search Options and Google Squared
Sure, but that particular phrase won't help much (I tried), and I think it would be hard work to find a reliable set of words to filter away. Furthermore, you might remove more than what you want (for example the site you want, if it contains a link to sites for price comparisons).

The real problem is that you sometimes want to exclude classes of sites.

Comment: Re:Blocking results from certain sites... (Score 2, Interesting) 171

by Lars Arvestad (#27939943) Attached to: Google Unveils Search Options and Google Squared
That is useful if a single site is the problem, but how do I say "I do not want results from any price comparison site"? This is a problem I see more and more of: searching for a product can bring up pages of more or less lame price comparison sites before meaning ful sites. The actual producer of the product you are looking for is surprisingly often way down in my listings.
Communications

+ - Delaying the "inevitable" death of Morse C->

Submitted by
synchros
synchros writes "The Wall Street Journal had a front-page article today describing one man's work to encourage the uptake of Morse code, by transcribing books into Morse Code-based audio CDs.

From the article: "So far, Mr. Adams says he has sold or donated thousands of Morse versions of such novels as Edgar Rice Burroughs's "At the Earth's Core," Daniel Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe," and H.G. Wells's "The Time Machine." In about an hour his software can take any book in the public domain and turn it into a string of digital dits and dahs; last weekend, he turned out a version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's - .... . / -... . .- ..- - .. ..-. ..- .-.. / .- -. -.. / -.. .- — -. . -.. (a.k.a., "The Beautiful and Damned")."

I'm just disappointed I didn't get my 20WPM before the Morse Code requirement for radio amateurs was dropped."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Fox News' FTP Password Anyone?

Submitted by Paris The Pirate
Paris The Pirate (799954) writes "Jeff Goodman writes "While browsing around the Fox News website, I found that directory indexes are turned on. So, I started following the tree up, until I got to /admin. Eventually, I found my way into /admin/xml_parser/zdnet/, in which, there is a shell script. Seeing as it's a shell script, and I use Linux, I took a peek. Inside, is a username and password to an FTP. So, of course, I tried to login. The result? Epic fail on Fox's part. And seriously, what kind of password is T1me Out. This is just pathetic." Anyone want to suggest a password policy to Fox?"
Businesses

+ - Outsourcing IT

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "Recently my boss announced at a meeting that the focus at our company should be to outsource all 'non-core' aspects of our business. Because what we do is very much IT related, it surprised me to hear that parts of IT should be outsourced as well. While our email and phone systems are currently outsourced, certain systems such as corporate websites, source code management, and project collaboration seem like things that are better managed in house. My question to the slashdot crowd is this: Given such a directive, would you recommend outsourcing? Why or why not?"
Space

+ - Space telescope to hunt for Earth-sized planets

Submitted by
TENxOXR
TENxOXR writes "The French-led Corot mission has taken off from Kazakhstan on a quest to find planets outside our Solar System. The space telescope will monitor about 120,000 stars for tiny dips in brightness that result from planets passing across their faces. The multinational mission will also study the stars directly to uncover more about their interior behaviour. The storey can be found over on the BBC News site ."
Programming

+ - Best Example of Good Open Source Code?

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "As a burgeoning software developer, I regularly use GPL'd software. Occasionally, I even take a peek at the code. But looking at the source code for firefox or thunderbird, I'm left wondering what a software developer who wishes to support open source does in his spare time. Learning such a complex code base would take a big commitment for even the simplest patches. I'm interested in knowing which piece(s) of software with an open source license have a model for good development. What applications stand out for good design and coding practices, as well as easily read and maintained source code? If open source produces better code (and I think it does), what are the best examples of good code? (and perhaps some examples of the worst as well)"

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