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Comment: Re:Not concerned (Score 2) 176

by gmhowell (#49353367) Attached to: German Auto Firms Face Roadblock In Testing Driverless Car Software

I should actually correct myself slightly: Wal-Mart (and others) have some in house drivers and some outsourced.

BTW, in discussions of the transport industry, don't get distracted/lied to by the companies. Some drivers think they are owner operators, when in practice, they aren't. They will lease/buy a truck from (as an example, all of the bigs do this) Schneider. As part of the lease terms, they can only accept loads from Schneider. It should be obvious that the 'owner' is an employee who has assumed much of the risk that the company would usually take on.

ShanghaiBill has a decent reply, but he misses a point: if the automated truck is cheaper, the big companies will drive that change in a heartbeat. The trick is that someone has to be convinced that they will be cheaper. They are unlikely to automatically accept that an automated truck is safer, faster, etc. One area where they are likely to be impressed is the possibility of 24 hour operations, rather than the 10 hour per day (rough) limits of human operated trucks. In addition to (possibly) being cheaper, this will allow faster shipments for more mundane goods (there are already plenty of ways to have fast shipping, but it is cost prohibitive to do for everything) which would offer them a competitive advantage. I suspect this last point will be the thin edge of the wedge.

Comment: Re:So lemme get this right: (Score 1) 45

by Nethead (#49320507) Attached to: Cisco SPA300/500 IP Phones Vulnerable To Remote Eavesdropping

The proper way to install your VoIP system is to run all the phones on their own VLAN that does not have Internet access. There is no reason for the phone set to have Internet access so why would you even have that on its wire? It shouldn't even have access to your desktops or servers, and vice-versa. The only thing that should be able to talk to the phones is the VoIP controller.

Comment: Re:This is why markets are not a good model for go (Score 5, Informative) 121

by Cyberdyne (#49313937) Attached to: FTC's Internal Memo On Google Teaches Companies a Terrible Lesson

The government should not be constrained by market assumptions, such as that resources are limited because of efficient allocation.

That's not a "market assumption", it's plain old reality: resources are finite, so you need priorities. If a cop pulls someone over for speeding, then sees an armed robbery in progress, or a paramedic is treating someone's sprained ankle then a bystander has a heart attack, do you want them to stick to what they were doing and reject the notion of priorities as being a "market assumption"? I'd rather they focus their efforts on the higher priority, because that gives the best outcomes.

In this case, the FTC had more pressing enforcement jobs, like telemarketing scams, the fight with cellphone companies over ripoff premium services ... they felt putting their resources there made more sense than fighting Google over the order of search results, and I'm not at all sure they were wrong about that.

By coincidence, I was discussing law enforcement priorities at work on Friday (we teach computer forensics for law enforcement, among other things); unlike the world of CSI, real law enforcement doesn't go spending days testing out an obscure theory, or digging into every possible detail of each case: they do enough work on a case to pass it to the next stage, then get on with the next case. No "market" - there just aren't an unlimited number of hours in each forensic caseworker's day.

Comment: Wtf? Where?! (Score 5, Informative) 79

by BrookHarty (#49287469) Attached to: Twitter Adds Tool To Report Tweets To the Police

From article.

> Women have been ruthlessly targeted on Twitter and on other sites like Reddit and 4chan, due to sexism in the video game industry, sometimes referred to as “Gamergate.”

This makes no freaking sense, How the the hell is the video game industry, reddit and gamergate followers ruthless attacking women on twitter?

Other than the 3 women who are anti-gamergate, where are the actual victims? Where are this masses of criminals doing this? I keep reading about it, all these evil people doing it, but nobody is ever arrested... Smells like propeganda for some special interests, like some group looking for funding for their businesses... Look war on women going on over here! But please dont investigate, just take our word.

So, this Zack Miners who wrote the story for IDG, the same IDG that pushes the war on women narative on all its publications without backing up it up with any facts. IDG Tech news = gossip, rumors and attack on evil gamers attacking women. Sheesh.

Comment: Re:A turd by any other name (Score 2) 317

by ppanon (#49281171) Attached to: Microsoft Is Killing Off the Internet Explorer Brand

                Go, tell the Spartans, thou who passest by,
                That here obedient to their laws we lie.

                Stranger, go tell the men of Lacedaemon
                That we, who lie here, did as we were ordered.

                Stranger, bring the message to the Spartans that here
                We remain, obedient to their orders.

                Oh foreigner, tell the Lacedaemonians
                That here we lie, obeying those words.

Comment: It's not the keyboard; it's the wrist rest (Score 1) 451

by CityZen (#49276435) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Good Keyboard?

What makes the difference in comfort and ergonomics is not so much the keyboard itself, but how you've got it set up, and particularly the wrist rest you use.

I'd recommend getting a "wrist rest platform" (a wrist rest with a platform that extends under the keyboard itself). The benefit over one without a platform is that it's less likely to get pushed away from the keyboard.

You should avoid resting the bottoms of your wrists on a hard surface for long periods of time (especially while typing).

Comment: Re:Nitrogen asphyxiation? (Score 4, Insightful) 1081

by Drishmung (#49259455) Attached to: How To Execute People In the 21st Century
That is very much the heart of it.

Consider at one extreme, public decapitation. However, only 'barbaric' cultures do this. So, the quest in the USA in particular was for a more 'humane' method, one that, incidentally, does not traumatise the executioner or the witnesses too much. (And that's a thing to consider. You probably don't want the sort of person who really, really enjoys their job to be an executioner in the first place [the normal solution to this is to appoint a condemned prisoner, but that has other problems]); and you probably don't want to send your humane executioner insane simply from doing their job either).

And so, the quest for 'humane' methods that don't traumatise anyone, which historically got side-tracked by the shiny of technology (poison gas, electricity).

Lethal injection goes to extreme lengths to pretend that all is sweetness and unicorns: victim is put gently to sleep, then paralyzed (so on-lookers don't freak out---of course if prisoner is not unconscious, this is the stuff of nightmares), then heart is stopped (apparently agonising if not unconscious). So. Many. Ways. To. Go. Wrong.

And it's all down to the pretence that the state can kill someone 'humanely'. Without upsetting anyone, not even the condemned.

"Mach was the greatest intellectual fraud in the last ten years." "What about X?" "I said `intellectual'." ;login, 9/1990

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