Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:BLINDED BY SCIENCE !! (Score 1) 315

by Kythe (#47632147) Attached to: Why the "NASA Tested Space Drive" Is Bad Science
And you're probably right. On the other hand, history is littered with the dust of skeptics whose names have been forgotten, while the names of many of those they attacked are remembered. Which is as it should be: while skeptics are often right, knee-jerk skepticism is also a particularly risk-free approach to things, isn't it? These researchers will have a chance to prove their results further, and others will attempt to replicate. We'll see what happens.

Comment: Re:Black box data streaming (Score 1) 503

by Kythe (#47484279) Attached to: Russia Prepares For Internet War Over Malaysian Jet
While true, many satellite earth stations require dishes that track satellites in order to provide an uplink (depends upon the band and the satellite system used). Within reason, a system can maintain a lock under a variety of circumstances. A hit from a missile and the resultant, immediate aircraft disintegration probably presents a situation that would make such a lock exceedingly difficult to maintain.

Comment: Re:Black box data streaming (Score 2) 503

by Kythe (#47484271) Attached to: Russia Prepares For Internet War Over Malaysian Jet
I work in this field (aeronautical communications, including satellite systems), and specifically with FAA personnel who are tasked with knowing and regulating such systems (spectrum managers). What I'm saying comes directly as an answer from them in response to a query about why we don't do exactly as you suggest. It's not merely a question of the total satellite bandwidth available. Satellite bandwidth is used for a lot of things, remember -- and only a small subset is used for protected aeronautical satellite (AMS(R)S) assignments. It's not as simple as you suggest.

Comment: Re:Black box data streaming (Score 3, Interesting) 503

by Kythe (#47482237) Attached to: Russia Prepares For Internet War Over Malaysian Jet
It's not a matter of technology. It's a matter of satellite bandwidth, given the number of flights in the air. One possible solution has been developed that predicts imminent disaster and rapidly commences data upload. I'm not sure whether that would work in the case of a missile attack, though.

Yes, we will be going to OSI, Mars, and Pluto, but not necessarily in that order. -- Jeffrey Honig

Working...