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Comment Ceding control (Re:Not sure I agree) (Score 1) 397

If you are safely hurtling along an Interstate at 70 mph, in a car whose systems required literally millions of hours of engineering, on a road surface that was also heavily engineered and painstakingly built by hundreds of workers using millions of dollars worth of large equipment... then congratulations, you've already ceded control of life-critical operations to numerous big, opaque corporations.

You're trusting your life to GM, Toyota, and the manufacturers of all the cars around you, that they won't spin out of control and kill you. You're trusting the road designers and government regulators that the surface won't suddenly buckle or turn. You're also trusting all your fellow bozos on the road not to be drunk, sleepy, texting or spilling coffee in their laps. Looking at the odds of what causes road deaths, I'm not that unhappy about extending further trust of my life to the relatively capable hands of auto company engineers.

Comment Re:Adapt GitHub To Other Uses (Score 1) 145

This, 100%. There are so many business applications for version control of documents of all kinds. It can be super-useful, it's not that hard to learn, and there is no reason at all to limit the system's use to "things that are part of a software build."

The alternative is the status quo at most places... a directory full of the same document appended with _v1, -v2, _v3.0, 3.1_EdChanges, v3Sandra1, _4-1-2015, _2015-04-03_v6... then just having to sort by date anyway, hoping the most recent one is really the one you want. Or worse, just one document with no idea at all of who edited it or how it got to be the way it is.

Comment Re:Experience is critical to anything so complex. (Score 1) 535

And if any company is ready to confront a giant money pit, it's Apple, with their giant money pile. They've been criticized for not doing enough with the billions in capital they've accumulated, now they just might make good use of it in the automotive sector.

Comment Re:Of course (Score 1) 211

It is not a rare anomaly. Wholesale power generators (including wind farms) are exposed to 5-minute and hourly price changes across large swaths of the nation. These prices dip below zero quite frequently, especially in the spring and fall, and have done for many years.

Since this means you end up paying money if you generate, this is an incentive for wind farms (and everyone else) to cut back on generation when demand for power is low. If it happens often enough, it reduces the incentive to build new power plants. Or, as you say, increases the incentive to install more storage, expensive as that might be.

That is how the system works, and it happens all the time. Interesting, but not anomalous.

Comment Re:Facebook is G+'s best advertising (Score 1) 51

An honest question - what is different about G+'s interface or paradigm (compared to Facebook) that gets people to post content that makes you like them more? I'm intrigued, but my first thought is that people can be asshats on both platforms, overposting about their bowel problems or their political views (sometimes difficult to distinguish which is which). If there's something fundamentally different about G+, what am I missing? (Or is it just that the cool people have migrated already...)

Comment Re:wikipedia is self-correcting and good at it (Score 1) 186

A different spin: instead of "more than half [of 30 cleverly-chosen minor falsehoods] survived for more than two months" how about saying, "After only two months, nearly half [of 30 falsehoods written specifically to be minor and fiendishly difficult to spot] had already been reversed."

I would say that is pretty darn good, considering the millions of articles there. It's certainly a step up from the misinformation allowed to stand as truth on biased "news" sites and kajillions of unedited blogs. Obviously no serious researcher or problem-solver would accept Wikipedia info blindly, but for finding out 98% of what you'll need to know about any conceivable topic, it can't be beat.

Comment Re:The real missed question (Score 1) 477

Let's also not forget... plenty of jobs are not office jobs, and no matter how much we automate, there will still be millions of those, far into the future. You wouldn't want to operate a big CNC machine remotely, you can't landscape somebody's yard unless you're there, you've got to be on site to move limbs if you're a physical therapist... the list goes on. Some people will need to be commuting, somehow, every day.

"Atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." -- Robin, The Boy Wonder