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Comment It broke Dragon Age II as well! (Score 2) 214

More than one month after release, many players still can't launch Dragon Age II because of a bug in the EA DRM software. Since the first few days, BioWare has ignored the problem entirely and provided us with no fixes or updates. More information:

Comment Re:Pardon my language and lack of depth, but.. (Score 1) 799

To be fair, we only have four types of coins in common circulation. Some areas of the country still use the 50-cent pieces and the $1 coins (very large cities such as NYC and Boston love the $1 coins as change for subway passes!), but the majority of places that I've visited in the States use only 1c, 5c, 10c, and 25c coins. The situation is worse in Canada, in the UK, and in countries that use the Euro. They've got 1c, 2c, 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, $1, and $2 coins (replace c with p and $ with Pound or Euro, as necessary). The situation with bank notes is also quite worse.

Comment Re:PDF in Office (Score 1) 520

Office 2007 has a free plugin available from Microsoft that exports to PDF just fine. If I recall, Adobe sued Microsoft to prevent them from bundling this functionality with Office because they didn't want the competition with Acrobat. I don't know if Office 2010 has a similar plugin, but I bet it does.

Comment Interesting Bug (Score 1) 356

I tried the linked demo in Firefox 3.5.3 on Windows 7 and it ran great. CPU usage capped at 13% and mostly stayed at about 2-4%. Fantastic! However, I noticed a strange bug. If I close the tab where the "video" is running, the audio continues to play until the end. That's incredibly obnoxious.

Comment Re:Well... (Score 1) 348 The Express Edition lacks a 64-bit compiler, OpenMP, profiling, and remote debugging. It also lacks a bunch of other stuff that I've never needed to use, but which others probably use regularly. Compared to the tools available on Linux, BSD, and MacOS X, VS EE is quite lacking.

Comment Re:RedHat question? (Score 1) 343

Perhaps it does depend on the job. I was hired as an intern at Red Hat, working with the kernel development team. I received my first shirt in the welcome kit that was mailed to my home, the second when I went down to Raleigh for new intern training, a third during the "I am Red Hat" promotion before the summit in 2008, and a fourth during a viewing of The Show. Plus, my fedora. So that's four shirts and a fedora over three months. :)

Comment Re:Ubuntu d/l burn errors (Score 2, Interesting) 483

That might not be sufficient, though. I recall downloading the MSDN release of Windows 7 while I waited for my physical discs from school. The ISO passed the SHA1, MD5, and size checks, but the burned disc contained errors that made the installation fail. Putting the image on a bootable USB stick solved the problem. So, it might have been a problem with the burning software or the drive itself.
The Almighty Buck

Submission Who Are the Heavy Clickers? 3

Reservoir Hill writes: "While focusing on clicks makes a lot of sense in search advertising, since the audience has already been highly qualified by their search term and is "hand-raising" — announcing their interest in a particular product or service or activity — what about banner ads on Web pages where the audience is not in an active search-and-buy mode? Dave Morgan has an interesting post on his blog about research done analyzing behavioral and click data to determine who clicks on banner ads, and whether they are different than the Web population in general. Ninety-nine percent of Web users do not click on ads on a monthly basis. Of the 1% that do, most only click once a month. Less than two tenths of one percent click more often. That tiny percentage makes up the vast majority of banner ad clicks. Who are these "heavy clickers"? They are predominantly female, indexing at a rate almost double the male population. They are older. They are predominantly Midwesterners, with some concentrations in Mid-Atlantic States and in New England. Not surprisingly, they look at sweepstakes far more than any other kind of content. They are the same people that tend to open direct mail and love to talk to telemarketers. Morgan makes the point that focusing banner ad campaigns to optimize on clicks means skewing campaigns to optimize on middle-aged women from the Midwest."

Submission $100 Billiion 'Fix' For Global Warming Discredited-> 4

slowboy writes: "Science Blog reports that a $100 billion fix for global warming may not work. The discredited 'fix' is the fertilization of potentially millions of tons of iron or other nutrients into the ocean to promote an algae bloom. If this was to work then the algae would start sucking the carbon out of the atmosphere and reduce the effects of a major greenhouse gas. But guess what, that may just not work, regardless of how it would disrupt the ocean's ecosystem. It seems that the carbon may not get pumped into the deeper ocean, it may just lie near the surface and get taken back up into the atmosphere. Fortunately we are finding this out now, and not after $100 billion of you're, mine and others tax money went to the scheme."
Link to Original Source

Comment Re:My school's network sucks :/ (Score 1) 306

Actually, I know of at least one school that DOES block everything but HTTP. Well, sort of. They actually block every port except for port 80. Even then, some protocols are blocked (like AIM). I've had quite the adventure these past eight weeks trying to get around the limitations. Fortunately, some awesome people started up for my IM needs, and Gentoo includes emerge-webrsync as an alternative to emerge --sync. Still, it's terribly annoying. If my home university did the same, I'd seriously consider moving off-campus. Students pay a large sum of money to live in the dorms and apartments provided by the University (~$6k/year). Part of that money goes toward funding the Internet connection. At the moment, the only type of traffic that they throttle is streaming video. That's enough. I don't need my games throttled, too.

"Ask not what A Group of Employees can do for you. But ask what can All Employees do for A Group of Employees." -- Mike Dennison