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Comment: Re:Doesn't matter even if the publishers win... (Score 4, Insightful) 699

by Knightman (#48549967) Attached to: French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Also, ad-heavy sites takes forever to load because the infrastructure supplying the ads sucks. On top of that the ad-agencies are using quite invasive tracking coupled with all the social network connectors that now are more or less standard on every site.

Comment: Re:Who pays for TSB investigation (Score 2) 165

by Knightman (#48309905) Attached to: Some Virgin Galactic Customers Demand Money Back

So if for example Boeing crashed an experimental prototype business jet, NTSB wouldn't need to be involved since Boeing is a for profit company and only rich people and companies would eventually buy the plane? Is that what you are saying?

Since FAA issued a license for the plane in question NTSB has to investigate the accident, and if the NTSB finds that the plane is unsafe they can recommend the FAA to rescind the license. Thats why NTSB is involved, it has nothing to do with "rich peoples hobbies".

+ - Why does the DNA double helix twist to the right?->

Submitted by Annanag
Annanag (3853767) writes "Most organic molecules have left- or right-handed versions, mirror images of each other, just like gloves. For some reason, life always seems to favour one version over the other — the DNA double helix in its standard form always twists like a right-handed screw, for example. But why this preference for left or right happens has always been a mystery. Now, in an experiment that took 13 years to perfect, physicists have found hints that this asymmetry of life could have been caused by electrons from nuclear decay in the early days of evolution."
Link to Original Source

+ - Where Whistleblowers End Up Working

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Jana Kasperkevic writes at The Guardian that it’s not every day that you get to buy an iPhone from an ex-NSA officer. Yet Thomas Drake, former senior executive at National Security Agency, is well known in the national security circles for leaking information about the NSA’s Trailblazer project to Baltimore Sun. In 2010, the government dropped all 10 felony charges against him and he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge for unauthorized use of a computer and lost his livelihood. “You have to mortgage your house, you have to empty your bank account. I went from making well over $150,000 a year to a quarter of that,” says Drake. “The cost alone, financially — never mind the personal cost — is approaching million dollars in terms of lost income, expenses and other costs I incurred.”

John Kiriakou became the first former government official to confirm the use of waterboarding against al-Qaida suspects in 2009. “I have applied for every job I can think of – everything from grocery stores to Toys R Us to Starbucks. You name it, I’ve applied there. Haven’t gotten even an email or a call back,” says Kiriakou. According to Kasperkevic, this is what most whistleblowers can expect. The potential threat of prosecution, the mounting legal bills and the lack of future job opportunities all contribute to a hesitation among many to rock the boat. "Obama and his attorney general, Eric Holder, declared a war on whistleblowers virtually as soon as they assumed office," says Kiriakou. "Washington has always needed an "ism" to fight against, an idea against which it could rally its citizens like lemmings. First, it was anarchism, then socialism, then communism. Now, it's terrorism. Any whistleblower who goes public in the name of protecting human rights or civil liberties is accused of helping the terrorists.""

+ - Widespread Chernobyl Radiation Risk From Forest Detritus

Submitted by Rambo Tribble
Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes "It is being reported that forest detritus, contaminated in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster [abstract], is decaying at a much slower rate than normal, building up and creating a significant fire risk. This, in turn, is creating a real potential for the residual radioactive material to be distributed, through smoke, over a broad area of Europe and Russia. Looking at different possible fire intensities, researchers speculate, "20 to 240 people would likely develop cancer, of which 10 to 170 cases may be fatal". These figures are similar to those hypothesized for Fukushima."

+ - jQuery.com Compromised To Serve Malware

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "jQuery.com, the official website of the popular cross-platform JavaScript library of the same name, had been compromised and had been redirecting visitors to a website hosting the RIG exploit kit and, ultimately, delivering information-stealing malware. While any website compromise is dangerous for users, this one is particularly disconcerting because of the demographic of its users, says James Pleger, Director of Research at RiskIQ."

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