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Comment: Science is a cheap imitation of life. (Score 1, Flamebait) 92

Live in a Democracy and you'll learn what life is. Thanks to a still liberal media we hear snippets of shit like this, but in a fortnight everything the media reports will be "mice cured of diabetes become zombies" or more realistically "lab mice cured of diabetes die painfully due to FDA-banned stem-cell treatment, Government bans Stem-cell testing on mice" Let's face it, there's WAY too many POOR politicians that need drug company money to let something like this actually gain a foothold in the market. There's way to damn many companies making money off the diabetics to let a simple injection cure them. No, the Government (CORPORATIONS) would rather let them suffer until they die requiring injections (that only the drug companies can provide AT A PRICE) every so many hours, every day. Not only that, but you have to test your "levels" every 3 hours with a 3 cent strip of paper and some chemicals (that magically make it cost 70 cents) to make sure you're balanced. Your damn cat's hairball problem is caused by an additive in the food that causes intestinal irritation, so that you buy the special hairball formulated food and hairball easing medicine (literally flavored petroleum jelly) that's marked up to astronomical levels. Generic Vasoline and fish blood would do the same damn thing, but because you're purchasing the "Scientific formulation" you're "treating your cat better". When I was in college there was a press release of a technology that "with an uncomfortable electric stimulation" your teeth would be electroplated with a hard layer of synthetic materials. This meant no cavities, ever. Granted, a new "dental research organization" funded by the Dentists themselves put that line on the back burner and all but killed any media attention. My last 'dentist' jammed a needle in my cheek while pinching and shaking said cheek to "numb the area" that cheek bled for 2 days and I still felt damn near everything he did to me. I'd rather pull each tooth out with his freshly removed cervical vertebrae, and pay for a set of dentures than return to the same hack job excuse for a dentist. He's the only one in cascade Iowa if you must know. Good luck getting ahead in this Corp-ocracy, you'll have to invent the next forceful arse-dialating device that earns the corporations their 99 percent while defecating on human beings worldwide.
Role Playing (Games)

+ - Pathfinder Online Kickstarter Campaign->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Goblinworks is having a hard time selling investors on the idea of funding a hybrid sandbox/fantasy MMO. While they have some self-funding and the backing of Paizo, they need to scrape together a large enough team and big enough backing of people to prove the concept viable through a *playable tech demo* and # of backers to raise the type of investment needed to make it properly.

If you're tired of WoW clones and want a fantasy sandbox that strives to be a real RPG instead of Mad Max in Forgotten Realms, I urge you to check it out. Based on what they are trying to do it's reasonable to assume the number of people backing the project will be more important than the amount they "kick" in.

The team is a talented and diverse group, if this concept can be made into a fun game, it's probably through this project."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Elementary Information Security,

Submitted by
benrothke
benrothke writes "Untitled documentol{margin:0;padding:0}.c5{max-width:468pt;background-color:#ffffff;padding:72pt 72pt 72pt 72pt}.c0{color:#1155cc;font-size:12pt;text-decoration:underline}.c3{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit}.c6{height:11pt;direction:ltr}.c2{text-align:justify;direction:ltr}.c4{font-style:italic}.c1{font-size:12pt}.c7{direction:ltr}.title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}.subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt}p{color:#000000;font-size:11pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"}h1{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}h2{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:4pt}h3{padding-top:14pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:4pt}h4{padding-top:12pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:2pt}h5{padding-top:11pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:2pt}h6{padding-top:10pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:2pt}

When I first got a copy of Elementary Information Security, based on its title, weight and page length, I assumed it was filled with mindless screen shots of elementary information security topics, written with a large font, in order to jack up the page count. Such an approach is typical of far too many security books. With that, if there ever was a misnomer of title, Elementary Information Securityis it.



For anyone looking for a comprehensive information security reference guide - Elementary Information Securityis it. While the title may say elementary, for the reader who spends the time and effort to complete the book, they will come out with a complete overview of every significant information security topic.



The book is in fact a textbook meant to introduce the reader to the topic of information security. But it has enough content to be of value to everyone; security notices or experienced professional.



Author Richard Smith notes that if you want to get a solid understanding of information security technology, you have to look closely at the underlying strengths and weakness of information technology itself, which requires a background in computer architecture, operating systems and computing networking.



With that, Elementary Information Securityis a tour de force that covers every information security topic, large and small. The book also provides a relevant overview of the peripheral topics that are embedded into information security.



In 17 chapters covering over 800 pages, the book is well organized and progressively gets more complex. Two large chapters of the book are freely available online, with chapter 3 hereand chapter 9 here.



The following are the chapters in the book, which shows a comprehensive overview of all of the core areas around information security:



1. Security From the Ground Up

2. Controlling a Computer

3. Controlling Files

4. Sharing Files

5. Storing Files

6. Authenticating People

7. Encrypting Files

8. Secret and Public Keys

9. Encrypting Volumes

10. Connecting Computers

11. Networks of Networks

12. End-to-End Networking

13. Enterprise Computing

14. Network Encryption

15. Internet Services and Email

16. The World Wide Web

17. Governments and Secrecy





The early chapters focus on the fundamentals of computers and networking, and the core aspects of information security. The chapters progress in complexity and deal with distributed systems and more complex security topics. The mid-chapters deal with cryptography, starting with an introduction to the topic, into more complex topics and scenarios. One is hard-pressed to find an information security topic not covered in the book.



Chapter 1 is on Security from the Ground Up and lays the groundwork for what security is. Various topics around risk are detailed; such as identifying, prioritizing and assessing risks.



Chapter 2 is on Controlling a Computerand reviews the underlying architecture around computers.



For some people, much of their learning about information security is based on rote memorization. In the book, Smith eschews this and each chapter closes with a glossary of topics, and penetrating questions. There are also problem definitions which detail practical situations with the hope that the reader can create and adequate security solution. The reader who spends extra time reviewing the questions will find that it will significantly help in their mastering the myriad topics.



The goal of the questions and exercises is to make the knowledge real. Some of the exercises include watching movies with computer security related topics such as The Falcon and the Snowman, Crimson Tide, and others. For example, in The Falcon and the Snowman, the author asks the reader to identify two types of security measure that would have helped prevent theft of the crypto keys. In Crimson Tide, it asks the reader to consider the missile launch procedures portrayed in the film and asks if it is possible for a single person to launch a nuclear missile. Another scenario is that under what circumstances a recipient should accept an unauthenticated message. It also asks the reader to give an example of a circumstance in which accepting an unauthenticated message would yield the wrong result.



The book is not meant as a For Dummies guide to the topic, and it assumes a college-level comprehension of relevant mathematical concepts. Note though that the requisite math is detailed in the sections on encryption and cryptography.



The book is also the first textbook certified by the NSAto comply with the NSTISSI 4011standard, which is the federal training standard for information security professionals. The author notes on his blog that in order to gain that certification, he had to map each topicrequired by the standard to the information as it appears in the textbook.



Given the value of the book, (ISC)should consider using this title as a reference for their CISSPcertification. With all of the CISSP preparation guides available, even the Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK,one is hard pressed to find a comprehensive all-embracing security reference such as this. Some may even want to simply use this book as their definitive CISSP study guide.



For those looking for a single encyclopedic reference on information security, they should look no further than Elementary Information Security. Richard Smith has written a magnum opus on the topic, which will be of value for years to come.







Ben Rothkeis the author of Computer Security: 20 Things Every Employee Should Know."
The Internet

+ - New York legalizes child pornography 1

Submitted by bs0d3
bs0d3 (2439278) writes "According to a recent ruling in New York state, from Senior Judge Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick, "Merely viewing Web images of child pornography does not, absent other proof, constitute either possession or procurement within the meaning of our Penal Law. Rather, some affirmative act is required (printing, saving, downloading, etc.) to show that defendant in fact exercised dominion and control over the images that were on his screen". Which means under New York state law, creating, and possessing child pornography is illegal; the lawmakers never specifically said that merely viewing it is a crime. The prosecution mentioned that the images were saved on his hard drive via the browser cache. However the court ruled that this was not the same as having a saved image. This means that people from New York state who click the wrong link by accident will no longer face serious jail time and a lifetime of registering as a sex offender. People will be able to report what they've found to the police who can then go after the source of the child porn, instead of someone who was merely browsing the internet."

Comment: Disgusting (Score 1) 1

For as much as they decide to "throw the book" at particularly glaring examples of rather harmless piracy, I hope the individuals responsible for this get it twice as hard. Breaking and entering is still a felony, isn't it? Not sure what Canada's policies are but I will be watching this one.

Comment: I still Want... (Score 2) 48

by JudasPreist (#39853903) Attached to: KegDroid: Combining Arduino, Android, and NFC to Dispense Beer
The app that had the beer pouring continuously out of the phone. That would be a great one. Impossible, yes, but great. This would be more useful if I could program a bot to pick one up from a designated location and then deliver it to a certain point with several delivery locations. That way your droid bot could serve out ice cold brewskies and you don't have to miss any of the game. No pre-existing hardware needed. As long as there is a path of no resistance, bingo, fresh beer.
Australia

+ - Appeal Against Australian ISP in Copyright Case Dismissed->

Submitted by
trawg
trawg writes "The Australian High Court has just dismissed an appeal by Australian and American media companies against ISP iiNet, in what will hopefully be the final step in an ongoing copyright lawsuit drama. The Court noted that "iiNet had no direct technical power to prevent its customers from using the BitTorrent system to infringe copyright". Ultimately, the court has held that iiNet's inactivity to act on infringement notices implied any sort of authorization of that infringement by their customers. Good news for Australians as a clear line has been drawn that will help ensure ISPs don't have to bear the cost of policing their customers."
Link to Original Source

+ - Microsoft announces 4th version of Windows 8->

Submitted by who_stole_my_kidneys
who_stole_my_kidneys (1956012) writes "Microsoft has announced a 4th edition of Windows 8 "Windows 8 Enterprise". With features such as Windows to go "a fully manageable corporate Windows 8 desktop on a bootable external USB stick. " and DirectAccess "allows remote users to seamlessly access resources inside a corporate network", IT shops that previously snubbed the OS in its beta release may be interested."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:I'll take two! (Score 1) 133

by JudasPreist (#39604671) Attached to: Battery-Powered Plasma Flashlight Makes Short Work of Bacteria
Notice I didn't say that the sinks would be removed. You would have plenty of opportunity to rinse off, then use the plasma flashlight or whatever clever patented name they create for it and then dry off somehow. The material in question would be removed, and any remaining bacteria dead, but maybe they should make you drip dry your hands as a penalty for being clumsy and getting material on your hands.

Comment: I'll take two! (Score 3, Interesting) 133

by JudasPreist (#39594335) Attached to: Battery-Powered Plasma Flashlight Makes Short Work of Bacteria
Wonder if it works on solid surfaces as well. Just imagine, use it on your face a few times a day and eliminate acne. Of course you'll probably get really tan really quickly, but yeah. No more Yellowish Brown splotches as you leave after donating blood, they can sanitize you with a quick brush of a plasma flashlight. If places replaced the costly paper towel dispensers and soap dispensers with one of these, (a heavy duty plugin version) you could sanitize the hands of a hundred people in like a minute! No more soap and wasteful paper towels that are almost never recycled after use as a hand towel. No more costly hot air hand dryers that take hundreds of watts to run.

Comment: Re:what the tsa will actually do (Score 1) 494

by JudasPreist (#39271799) Attached to: The Ineffectiveness of TSA Body Scanners
No, they'll simply implement a addendum to the law that requires each Victim turn completely around while in the scanner. Boom, work-around that simple. So next time you go plan for an extra half hour for each plane load of victims to turn in the right direction while in the scanner. Most capable TSA employee: "wait, do you turn TOWARDS your right arm, or AWAY from your right arm? Which is the right direction?"

"You know, we've won awards for this crap." -- David Letterman

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