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Comment: Re:Interesting methodology... (Score 1) 357

by Joren (#37952500) Attached to: Hardware Running Android Fails More Than iPhone, BlackBerry Hardware

So... what this study is telling me is that, if I want my phones to be considered reliable, I can just create a mobile operating system that's so confusing and has so many software problems, that any hardware calls I DO get will be dwarfed by the sheer quantity of calls from people stymied by crashing programs and bad interface designs, and will therefore have a lower percentage of hardware-related calls. I suppose it's too much to ask for something like support calls per thousand units sold, broken down by problem type?

And yes, the actual article uses percent of support calls made as the sole deciding factor to rank which platform is most unreliable. I'm beginning to understand why nobody reads the articles here... you really aren't missing much.

Comment: Interesting methodology... (Score 1) 357

by Joren (#37952438) Attached to: Hardware Running Android Fails More Than iPhone, BlackBerry Hardware
So... what this study is telling me is that, if I want my phones to be considered reliable, I can just create a mobile operating system that's so confusing and has so many software problems, that any hardware calls I DO get will be dwarfed by the sheer quantity of calls from people stymied by crashing programs and bad interface designs, and will therefore have a lower percentage of hardware-related calls.

I suppose it's too much to ask for something like support calls per thousand units sold, broken down by problem type?
Youtube

+ - UMG uses DMCA to get Bad Lip Reading parody taken 3

Submitted by
Joren
Joren writes "Bad Lip Reading is an independent producer known for anonymously parodying music and political videos by redubbing them with his humorous attempts at lip-reading, such as Everybody Poops (Black Eyed Peas) and Trick the Bridesmaid (Obama). According to an interview in Rolling Stone , he creates entirely new music from scratch consisting of his bad lip readings, and then sets them to the original video, often altering the video for humorous effect and always posting a link to the original off which it is based. Although his efforts have won the respect of parody targets Michael Bublé and Michelle Bachman, not everyone has been pleased. Two days ago, UMG succeeded in getting his parody Dirty Spaceman taken down from YouTube, and despite BLR's efforts to appeal, in his words UMG essentially said "We don't care if you think it's fair use, we want it down." And YouTube killed it.So does this meet the definition of parody as a form of fair use? And if so, what recourse if any is available for artists who are caught in this situation? Are UMG's actions a justifiable attempt to defend their rights under the law, or should this be seen as an attempt to get content they don't like removed from the Internet?"

Comment: Re:Silly. (Score 1) 247

by Joren (#37528212) Attached to: Returning Power From Electric Cars To the Grid

Only application that I can figure for this being anywhere remotely useful would be to use vehicles as generators when grid power is out

There was a documentary about this on NHK (Japanese broadcaster)... In the aftermath of the disaster in Japan, some of the victims were using electric cars as portable generators to power chargers for cell phones so that people could call home. There was even some kind of ad hoc relief organization set up around people bringing in EVs from outside in order to do this.

Mitsubishi has also released a device for its iMiev vehicle that allows homes to use power from the car. Nissan's Leaf also got a lot of press coverage because of a similar adapter they were developing (may be out now, I don't remember) - supposedly an electric vehicle at full charge can power a Japanese home for an entire day (including nonessentials like TV). This is also getting a lot of attention due to the power crises in Japan; the car can be used as a power source during peak hours and recharge while off-peak. Not sure how smart that is for battery life, though, nor do I know how they deal with the grid issues you mentioned. I imagine it would be similar to using a home solar panel as a supplemental source, which is becoming more common in Japan. Again, not sure what they do to interface with the grid, but I know they can sell power back to the grid as well as use it for themselves.

-- Joren

Comment: Gloria Gordon Bolotsky - ENIAC "Rosie" (Score 4, Informative) 113

by Joren (#35148218) Attached to: Rediscovering WWII's Top-Secret Computing 'Rosies'
Randomly saw this article from 2009 a few minutes before seeing this Slashdot story. Seems she had quite the career:

"Gloria Gordon Bolotsky was a gifted mathematician who, after working for the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York, moved to the University of Pennsylvania for a position at its engineering school. She was chosen for a secret project that would use her skills and moved with the group in 1947 to the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland."
Television

+ - Japanese Supreme Court Rules TV Forwarding Illegal->

Submitted by eldavojohn
eldavojohn (898314) writes "If you use anything like a Slingbox in Japan, you may be dismayed to find out that a Japanese maker of a similar service has been successfully sued by Japan Broadcasting Corp. and five Tokyo-based local TV broadcasting firms under copyright violations for empowering users to do similar things. TV forwarding or place shifting is recording and/or moving your normal TV signal from its intended living room box to your home computer or anywhere on the internet. Turns out that Japan's Supreme Court overruled lower court decisions confirming fears that to even facilitate this functionality is a copyright infringement on the work that is being transferred."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Not the most flattering portrayal... (Score 5, Funny) 378

by Joren (#34974892) Attached to: Why Eric Schmidt Left As CEO of Google?

Because everybody is a corporation?(!)

Corporation as a construct are intended to behave in psychopathic manors. Most people on the other hands are not psychopaths,

Then that's a problem, because with the economy as it is I don't think we have the resources to design and build psychopathic manors large enough to house each corporation. Plus, the work required to ensure that each manor was sufficiently psychopathic... nevermind the environmental impact statements...

Comment: Re:Information (Score 1) 650

by Joren (#30719874) Attached to: The End Of Gravity As a Fundamental Force

In his theory, gravity exists because of a difference in concentration of information in the empty space between two masses and its surroundings.

So... information wants to be free?

Yeah, he's just not getting it. Somebody queue the car analogies.

My post was funny, but it was intended half-seriously. The summary seemed to be stating that the difference in information concentration was responsible for gravity, which created an odd word-picture in my mind... almost as if information was being held under "pressure" that was contrasting against the vacuum of space, and it wanted out, and so the fleeing information from two objects brought them together.

...on second thought, yeah, why don't you go ahead and bring out the car analogies...

Comment: Re:About time to arm ourselves (Score 2, Insightful) 450

by Joren (#30650576) Attached to: INTERPOL Granted Diplomatic Immunity In the US
That which you quoted is section 2b. This was *already* given to them by the original order as signed by Ronald Reagan. Obama isn't granting them the rights under 2b, because Interpol already had them all along and nobody noticed. Please see the original order: Executive Order 12425. Notice that 2b is not listed in the "exceptions", meaning that they have the rights under 2b.

Comment: Re:idleispants (Score 1) 174

by Joren (#30179946) Attached to: How Heavy Is the Internet?

Why isn't this in idle?

If it's supposed to be serious, you have to amortize the weight of the equipment over its uses. A desktop that spends half its use playing solitaire, 1/4 of its use surfing the web, and 1/4 of its use spamming the world under viral control only counts for half.

If you're weighing traffic, sure. I figured they were weighing connectivity - an analogous question might be, "how much does your corporate network weigh?" Being part of a network doesn't require actually using it

Of course, you'd still have to decide whether/how to amortize time spent off the network (e.g. computer is off, phone is outside of data plan area, etc).

"Atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." -- Robin, The Boy Wonder

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