Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Slashdot Deals: Prep for the CompTIA A+ certification exam. Save 95% on the CompTIA IT Certification Bundle ×

Comment Shitty JavaScript == massive memory leaks (Score 1) 350

A single tab using 300 MB for its JavaScript scratchpad isn't uncommon these days, even tabs whose scratchpads grow by the second. This tab is consuming 36 MB currently (up from 32 MB a few minutes ago), with a single poorly-designed ad consuming 4 MB alone. Resource usage on this tab appears to be growing at about 1 MB per minute due to shitty JavaScript on the page.

I used to keep Slashdot open in a tab all day, everyday, but not anymore. I have to close Slashdot frequently to clear up its huge memory leaks.

Comment How did you avoid a cult of personality? (Score 1) 383

Linux doesn't seem to rely on a cult of personality around Linus so much as it relies on the person Linus, whereas other projects like Python form a cult of personality around Guido van Rossum, or GNOME 3 forms a cult of personality around designer Allan Day, etc.

How did you cultivate Linux with your strong personality while avoiding a cult of personality, and how can other project leaders employ similar techniques to benefit their projects?

Comment 1s > 128ms, therefore slew (Score 2) 233

NTP would typically slew a 1-second difference, so Google is not out-of-line to add the second at the beginning of the day and slew their systems over the course of the day. Google uses lots of vector clocks in their distributed systems, they may have calculated that slewing over the course of the day introduces fewer time differences between machines than counting the final second twice (due to drift, which is inevitable on any NTP slave, corrected by "frequency discipline" and error estimates).

Comment LIMITATION IS 10 YEARS IF YOU FILE (Score 3, Informative) 734

Statute of Limitations is 10 years IF YOU FILE.

If you don't file: there is no limitation. They can collect for all earnings over the course of your entire life.

Citizens have a different limitation than the IRS. The IRS' limitation never expires if you don't file, but your limitation to collect from the IRS, should they owe you, expires in 3 years if you don't file. There is a potential loophole to this in the Codes, but the IRS privately interprets that loophole to apply to amended returns only (I tried using the loophole). As a kid I was dumb and ignorant, and I considered about 5 years of returns as a savings account I'd collect on later. Well, I lost all of those returns because of the 3-year limitation for citizens to collect from the IRS. And I'd have to sue the IRS in federal court and win to get them to honor the loophole exemption on all returns, not just amended returns.

Comment There are tax implications (Score 3, Informative) 734

US citizens residing in foreign countries are still required to pay US Federal Income Tax while abroad, even if they never return. I guess you're paying for the protections the local embassies could theoretically give you, if you don't expatriate and renounce your citizenship in accordance with 8 USC 1481(a)(6).

Comment ^^ URBAN LEGEND (Score 1) 734

You are required to file under all circumstances, although they may not care to come after you if you fall below the minimum threshold for owing tax... See the relevant U.S.C. sections, all citizens are required... If self-employed then you will always owe tax, even if you only made $500.

Comment FEDERAL INCOME TAX && renunciation of citi (Score 1) 734

Technically, and IIRC, Americans abroad must continue to file income tax. You should be filing federal income tax 1040 forms each year. Do you? If you get American citizenship for your kids, they could become responsible for filing federal taxes when they start working, even if they never come back to the US, and if they never file and they do come back, they have owe a bunch of back taxes.

A lot of Americans who live abroad and never intend to return to the United States will renounce their citizenship in order to get out of the Federal Income Tax filing requirements. The procedure for renouncing your citizenship is described in 8 USC 1481(a)(6).

When a fellow says, "It ain't the money but the principle of the thing," it's the money. -- Kim Hubbard

Working...